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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A+ for "The Name of the Wind"
A+ for "The Name of the Wind" by Patrick Rothfuss.

The author comes in as a relative unknown in the fantasy genre with this stunning debut. I was browsing message boards on the best (recent) fantasy novels and this was recommended to me. One of the best parts about the book is the ease of the reading. I couldn't book this book down. The prose was tight, and I...
Published on Sept. 26 2009 by Zafri M.

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars well written and engaging but a tad long.
Not much else to say. There is a good story here but it is a long one. It does not, in fact, fit into this book. To me that creates a conundrum about the story and the telling. On the one hand I never truly lost interest in what I was being told but, on the other, how much of it was necessary to the story. Length is not the issue. There are many wonderful and long...
Published 12 months ago by NM


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A+ for "The Name of the Wind", Sept. 26 2009
A+ for "The Name of the Wind" by Patrick Rothfuss.

The author comes in as a relative unknown in the fantasy genre with this stunning debut. I was browsing message boards on the best (recent) fantasy novels and this was recommended to me. One of the best parts about the book is the ease of the reading. I couldn't book this book down. The prose was tight, and I think every chapter adds something to greater understanding of one of the main characters, or the interesting but still relatively unexplored setting. Despite its length, you will devour this novel if you like fantasy and character driven action.

A few other reviews point out that this book is LONG. That is most certainly the case, but I absolutely believe that the book is still well-paced and eminently readable. Full of love and loss and music, this book should not be missed by anyone who calls themselves a fan of fantasy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing book, June 9 2014
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I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a good story. I do not usually like 'fantasy' books, but although this book is set in an 'other worldly' setting, at its core it is an amazingly well written story.
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25 of 32 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good and ambitious debut, Feb. 9 2007
By 
Patrick St-Denis "editor of Pat's Fantasy Hot... (Laval, Quebec Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Name of the Wind (Hardcover)
You may or may not have heard of Patrick Rothfuss' debut. Word is beginning to spread around the internet, so chances are that you'll be hearing more and more about this one soon. Last fall I received an email from Rothfuss' agent, Matt Bialer, asking me if I'd consider reading an ARC of The Name of the Wind. Bialer revealed that Betsy Wollheim, Daw Books' president, considered the novel the best fantasy debut she's ever read in over 30 years as an editor. Well, let it be said that a lot less is required to pique my curiosity! Both wanted me to be one of the first reviewers to get a crack at it, and I wish to thank them for thinking of me. Apparently they respect my reviews. . . Imagine that!;-)

Of course, when a debut comes with such high praise on its front cover, it's impossible to treat it as just another debut. For obvious reasons, all of a sudden you find yourself judging it against works such as Robert Jordan's The Eye of the World, Tad Williams' The Dragonbone Chair, George R. R. Martin's A Game of Thrones, Stephen R. Donaldson's Lord Foul's Bane, and other opening chapters of superior series. Understandably, this can have positive as well as negative repercussions.

In a nutshell, The Name of the Wind recounts the tale of Kvothe, a young man destined to become the most powerful wizard the world has ever seen. It begins with Kvothe's childhood years, first as a member of a traveling troupe of musicians and artists, and then as a street urchin forced to fend for himself in a violent environment. Later, the story shifts to his adolescence, at a time when he is admitted to the University, renowned school of magic.

Reading along, I found the structure of the story a little odd. The better part of the novel is comprised of Kvothe's back story, with only a few scenes occurring in "real time." Having never encountered something like it, I discussed it with Betsy Wollheim. She did shine some light on the matter, and it turns out that Rothfuss' first trilogy will focus on the main character's past, with occasional tantalizing hints of things to come. A second trilogy will then recount Kvothe's "present" tale.

The Name of the Wind is told in a first person narrative. Hence, other than those "real time" segments told in the third person, most of the book is told from Kvothe's perspective. Those who have a problem with single-POV narratives similar to that of Robin Hobb's The Farseer and The Tawny Man trilogies, consider yourselves warned. The main danger in using the first person narrative is that the entire story rests on the shoulder of a single character. If you like Kvothe, terrific. If you don't, that's where it gets tricky. I had no problem with that facet of the novel, but I'm acutely aware that some readers don't care much for the first person perspective.

The worldbuilding doesn't play a big role in this debut. And yet, Rothfuss hints at a much vaster depth, hopefully to be explored in future sequels. The author has an eye for details, and the story does come alive as you turn the pages. The magic system appears to be well thought of and interesting, and I'm eager to learn more about it.

The Name of the Wind is a character-driven book. As a first person narrative, it can't be anything but that. The supporting cast is composed of a relatively small number of characters, which is rather rare for a book of this size. I'm looking forward to learning more about them in the upcoming installments.

The novel suffers from only one flaw -- a flaw shared by various Daw books: it's too long. I feel that Rothfuss' attention to details slows the pace in several portions of the book. Now, the tentative pagination of The Name of the Wind weighs in at 904 pages, making this debut a heavyweight. I feel that some scenes could have been truncated and others excised without the readers missing out on any major plotlines. In my opinion, this would quicken the rhythm and improve the overall quality of the book.

Unlike some debuts that are not easily accessible -- Hal Duncan's Vellum and Steven Erikson's Gardens of the Moon come to mind -- I'm persuaded that The Name of the Wind can appeal to both neophytes and long-time fans of the genre. As such, it's similar to both Brandon Sanderson's Elantris and Joe Abercrombie's The Blade Itself in that regard. It's also a throwback work, which brought fantasy novels likes Raymond E. Feist's Magician and David Eddings' Pawn of the Prophecy to mind.

Although a bit overlong, The Name of the Wind is a solid and ambitious effort. Two years ago I would have claimed that it could well be the debut of the year. But Hal Duncan and Scott Lynch have forced us to look at debuts in a different way. Still, Patrick Rothfuss wrote an auspicious debut, and I'm curious to discover the rest of Kvothe's tale.

Patrick

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5.0 out of 5 stars Great story - so well told and written, Sept. 2 2014
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Great story and more to the point - great writing. Perhaps the book seems long, but the characters are very copmpelling, and the world the Rothfuss creates is so original and smart. Nothing is predictable or given away - his ability to story-tell is magnificent. It means I am looking forward to "Day Two" - even if it is 1,110 pages long!
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5.0 out of 5 stars definately lived up to the hype, Aug. 24 2014
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Heard about this book for a few years now. Finally decided to pick it up and check it out to give my mind something to think about other then my studies and was just blown away.

Definately a journey i didnt expect to go through so fast.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars well written and engaging but a tad long., Sept. 4 2013
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Not much else to say. There is a good story here but it is a long one. It does not, in fact, fit into this book. To me that creates a conundrum about the story and the telling. On the one hand I never truly lost interest in what I was being told but, on the other, how much of it was necessary to the story. Length is not the issue. There are many wonderful and long stories. We readers do not need to be told everything and there are some things that we should be told that are not necessary to complete the story. A great story teller, however, finds the right balance between what can be told and what needs to be told and I do not think that this was great story telling. That being said it was good story telling, well written and compelling enough that I will be reading the rest of the story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars the Kingkiller chronicles are some of the best written Fantasy books I have had the pleasure to ..., July 11 2014
By 
Rob Edwards "another_boiling_frog" (Kingston, On, Canada) - See all my reviews
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I bow to you Patrick Rothfuss, the Kingkiller chronicles are some of the best written Fantasy books I have had the pleasure to read.. i eagerly await the next chapter.. feed me
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, July 5 2014
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I love this book
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Fantasy That Suffers From A Failure Of Imagination, Jan. 13 2014
By 
Corey Lidster (Belleville, Ontario) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
While it certainly has the pagecount of a fantasy epic, and the profusion of silly names (the main character is called Kvothe), for the most part this is a banal and predictable tale; a vaguely likable hero is on a meandering quest of vengeance against a cliched cabal of powerful demigods who killed his parents. He's not in any hurry, however, and neither is the author, who's content to dawdle on the streets of 'Tarbean' with his homeless orphan hero, in a mystifying digression that expands neither our interest in the world or character the author is trying to build. As we follow Kvothe into 'The University', the story adopts a grittier and more practical approach to Harry Potter tropes. Kvothes' concerns become pettier and pettier, problems with tuition, and snarky professors, and of course, the rich-kid upperclassman who becomes his sworn enemy. Our hero's friends are all one-dimensional constructs who apparently are interested only in the events of Kvothes' life, a collection of speech patterns and superficial traits that mask their purpose as mirrors to further examine Kvothe -- who is himself a thinly disguised product of the author's own navel-gazing. If you're looking for truly epic Tolkien or Martin-scale world-building, look elsewhere. If you're looking for rousing adventure, unforgettable characters and emotionally wrenching plot twists, look elsewhere. If you're looking for a book that is excruciatingly underedited, and wish to torture yourself with pretentious prose passages that begin: "It was a silence of three parts...", then by all means, seek out 'The Name of the Wind'.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love this Book!, Aug. 7 2012
I have to admit, I am not quite finished this book. Unfortunately, I had to put it down and go to work today. However, I am thoroughly enjoying what I have read so far.

I find that this book strikes just the right balance between really forcing a point and leaving something to the imagination. The lack of repetition is especially refreshing. The characters are well-developed and described in just the right amount of detail to create a picture in my mind (which, if this is later developed into a series/movie, could either be a good or a bad thing, I suppose).

I am definitely not an expert - I fall somewhere between functionally literate and an avid reader - but I would definitely recommend this book.
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The Name of the Wind
The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss (Hardcover - March 27 2007)
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