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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Comprehensive---but Lacks an Easy Access Topic Format
My wife and I feel that the WHAT TO EXPECT TODDLER YEARS belongs in every new parent's library along with the other 2 books in the series. They have truly been our "parenting bibles." There is a great deal of useful information in this comprehensive reference guide about 1's, 2's and 3's, and we especially like the medical advice offered. However, we are sometimes...
Published on March 9 2004

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Great information but the format is not as effective...
as in Eisenberg's earlier books, "What to Expect When You're Expecting" and "What to Expect The First Year."
Like those two volumes, "What to Expect Toddler Years" is arranged month-by-month. This doesn't work as well since toddler development is much less predictable and more individualistic than infants development; hence, the issue...
Published on Feb. 7 2002


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Comprehensive---but Lacks an Easy Access Topic Format, March 9 2004
By A Customer
My wife and I feel that the WHAT TO EXPECT TODDLER YEARS belongs in every new parent's library along with the other 2 books in the series. They have truly been our "parenting bibles." There is a great deal of useful information in this comprehensive reference guide about 1's, 2's and 3's, and we especially like the medical advice offered. However, we are sometimes disappointed when we attempt to quickly look up insight and answers to specific behavioral questions that continue to pop up with our 2 and 3 year-old daughters. Since the chapter format is organized by months of age instead of topics, we sometimes become frustrated searching for the guidance we need at the moment scattered under different months of age. Additionally, when we do find the information, we often want more depth and more tips to try for each misbehavior. However, we do realize that no one book can have it all-even one with over 900 pages! Recently, my wife found a very helpful pocket-guide in her OB's waiting room, called appropriately- THE POCKET PARENT. It is filled with hundreds of sensible quick-read bulleted suggestions to many of the behavior concerns that we have with our children. "The Pocket Parent" is published by the same publisher (Workman) and is exclusively written for parents of 2's, 3's, 4's, and 5's. The many topics are in an A-Z format, sprinkled with a good dose of compassion and humor that we find helpful and comforting. This totally up-beat book does not preach (no should's or dont's) and is a great little companion for the more encyclopedic "What to Expect Toddlers". "The Pocket Parent" recognizes that the parents are the real experts with their children. The authors suggest that each parent filter the advice through their own personalities and parenting styles and select those strategies that seem to be a good fit for their family. It addresses such common concerns as Bad Words, Bedtime, Biting, Fears at night, Gimmes, Lying, Morning "Crazies", Separation Anxiety, Sibling Rivalry, Tantrums, and Whining . I found myself chuckling as a read some of the brief anecdotes (many specifically about dads) that I coincidently just encountered with my own kids. Both of these reference guides continue to ease our anxieties and frustrations while building the confidence necessary to make good choices as parents. We highly recommend both of these books for your home library to refer to again and again especially when you're in need of some sensible information or just a caring verbal hug that everything is going to be OK.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars valuable information, March 15 2006
By A Customer
I always have this book on hand for quick references. It addresses many situations that I have encountered with my now, two year old son and helped both his father and I get through them effectivly. The only complaints that I have, is like another reviewer, the recipes are lacking and also some things that are highly debatable. For example; the breastfeeding not being usefull after a year. However, I do believe that they mean if your toddler is breastfeeding very frequently, they are not getting enough of the esstential calories and high fats that toddlers need for growth until age two.
I would recommend this book to smart parents who can take advice and have an open mind, and use the information alongside their own instincts.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Great information but the format is not as effective..., Feb. 7 2002
By A Customer
as in Eisenberg's earlier books, "What to Expect When You're Expecting" and "What to Expect The First Year."
Like those two volumes, "What to Expect Toddler Years" is arranged month-by-month. This doesn't work as well since toddler development is much less predictable and more individualistic than infants development; hence, the issue in question might be found in "The Twentieth Month" even though your toddler is only, say, 15 months old. Also, the monthly "milestone" lists for toddlers are guaranteed to make you neurotic, as toddler development is much more individual than infant development.
However, the book contains a lot of great information and advice. I think it would have been better to organize it into sections such as "Feeding," "Discipline," "Sleeping," "Playtime," etc., rather than trying to break it down month-by-month, but taken as a whole it is a valuable reference. Just don't panic if your 13-month-old is already throwing tantrums and they aren't addressed til Month 24, and if your 18-month-old still hasn't mastered a spoon even though the list says she "should" be able to do it by now.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Well Intentioned Compendium of Useful Information, Nov. 29 2001
By A Customer
I agree that there are areas of this volume that show a particular bias, as with the notion of breastfeeding after the age of one year. As a Mom whose child nursed well after his first birthday, I can still say that there were many, many times I reached for this book. Being a first time parent, I often find it comforting to know that this sequal to 'What to Expect the First Year' is only as far as my book case. -- In my experience, the developmental milestones have often provided the reassurance I was looking for, and if (like me) you've never shared your daily existence with a toddler before, you might be surprised by some of the behaviors/situations that arise. No book will ever be written that will be the 'perfectly adequate and correct path to raising the child of your dreams'. -- Happily, we're all far too unique for such a 'one size fits all' approach. This little volume simply offers a perspective of what some other parents have encountered along with a possible response. -- After all, it is only one resource. It offers a starting point, opens the dialogue. That's all that a book should reasonably be expected to do. I am grateful for, not resentful of, this book's intentions. I always read or discuss issues pertaining to parenting with the notion that it is up to me as a parent to do the research, evaluate the knowledge I get and frame my own point of view of what is relevant for my particular child and family.
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1.0 out of 5 stars You can't trust information in this book!, Sept. 27 2001
The books' information on breastfeeding after 1 year stunned and outraged me! If from the beginning they make such outrageously false statements as "nursing beyond one year does not have any nutritional benefits", etc., how can you trust the rest of the book? There is tons of research that proves beyond any doubt that extended breastfeeding is good both for the baby and for the mother, but somehow they bluntly ignore it and tell you that it's actually bad! What they basically say is OK, you can go on nursing if you want to, but here are 10 reasons why it's bad for your child and why you shouldn't do it. This just left me speechless! It's OK for me though, because I read other sources and did my own research on breastfeeding long before I bought this book, but what about other mothers who rely on this well-known and supposedly trustworthy series of "what to expect"? I urge every mother who thinks about continuing nursing after first birthday to ignore this book and read other literature, like "The Baby Book" by Dr. Sears or Mothering Your Nursing Toddler by Norma J. Bumgarner.
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1.0 out of 5 stars You can't trust information in this book!, Sept. 27 2001
By A Customer
The books' information on breastfeeding after 1 year stunned and outraged me! If from the beginning they make such outrageously false statements as "nursing beyond one year does not have any nutritional benefits", etc., how can you trust the rest of the book? There is tons of research that proves beyond any doubt that extended breastfeeding is good both for the baby and for the mother, but somehow they bluntly ignore it and tell you that it's actually bad! What they basically say is OK, you can go on nursing if you want to, but here are 10 reasons why it's bad for your child and why you shouldn't do it. This just left me speechless! It's OK for me though, because I read other sources and did my own research on breastfeeding long before I bought this book, but what about other mothers who rely on this well-known and supposedly trustworthy series of "what to expect"? I urge every mother who thinks about continuing nursing after first birthday to ignore this book and read other literature, like "The Baby Book" by Dr. Sears or Mothering Your Nursing Toddler by Norma J. Bumgarner.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Just Average, July 26 2000
By 
Jocelyn L. Smith "jessiegrrl" (Johnson City, TN United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is an excellent reference for any medical concerns a parent might have, and also does well in addressing concerns such as diet, exercise, and TV watching. However, too often the authors' advice reflects western parenting prejudice and does not present research representing opposing viewpoints--although it pretends to do so. For instance, in the 13th month or so, a hypothetical question is, "Why should I wean my baby if we're both enjoying nursing still?" The reply? "Oh, you don't have to...it's your choice...but here's all the reasons why you should." And then they go on to list twelve benefits of early weaning and absolutely none of the benefits of nursing a toddler! If the authors gave even the tiniest disclaimer ("In our opinion...") I wouldn't be so hard about this, but they present every answer as gospel truth.
In other words, whether or not you will benefit from this book depends on the state of your parenting philosophy. I prefer "The Baby Book" for advice about toddler behavior and needs.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Fairly useful, May 20 2000
By 
saliero (NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
This is very comprehensive. Thank goodness there is a comprehensive index, becuase the arrangement is a bit off-putting.
The chapters are broken down "chronologically" - The Thirteenth Month, The 25th to 27th Month etc etc.
Within each section it contains "milestones" type information - carefully labelled 'what your child MIGHT be doing' (it reinforces that children develop at different rates, but it still does encourage you to compare 'your child' with some 'norm'.
After that there are sections on 'What You May Be Concerned About' - for example, at the 19th month it might be 'night wandering, 'underactivity' or 'unclear speech' amongst other things. Thing is, these are not necessarily chronologically-linked. So you need to read right through the Table of Contents and use the index (some page refs are wrong, by the way)to find the topic you are interested in. Then follow sections on 'What You Need To Know' and 'What Your Child Needs To Know', again int he age-specific sections.
I think it would be much better arranged thematically. Perhaps a short section on things that really are age-specific. There are subsequent sections on things such as special needs children, toilet learning, feeding.
I have found the information on illness particularly useful and at other times much other information useful, interesting or reassurring.
I think this book earns its place in a parent's reference library. Its usefulness extends well beyond the toddler years, and for some things is still good in the early years of school (by which time life is so busy there isn't a lot of time for consulting books!)
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3.0 out of 5 stars Fair to Medium in real life., Feb. 19 2000
By A Customer
In my experience as an early childhood teacher, toddlers and early preschoolers are similar in the basic parenting needs. Getting them to become independent is a good policy as long as it doesn't go over board. Why can't kids stay kids a little longer? This book has some excellent ideas but very little that parents can contribute as a reference towards the beginning stages towards emerging into early preschool. Toddlers learn so quickly and many enter a parent's day out program at 18-months-old. The book is a little behind. For parents who would like a book to take them from one reference to another beginning stage, I'd recommend a book we just finished in a parenting class: "Mommy-CEO." This gives 5 golden rules parents can use from infants to teens and we can go back again and again to pick up tips. It's different than Eisenberg and Murkoff's book because it tells us in simple terms exactly how to promote and motivate acceptable behavior from toddlers to teens from parents who have had success. Eisenberg's toddler book is fair to medium in today's fast track families.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good reference, but...., Jan. 24 2000
By A Customer
I bought this book as a first time parent who wanted something encyclopedic that we could reach for in the middle of the night if necessary, and this book serves that purpose. It has a good index, which is helpful. Unfortunately, the authors seem to take advantage of far too many opportunities to peddle their agenda of weaning children by one year from breast or bottle, as well as getting them to sleep alone in a crib throughout the night. As other reviewers pointed out, they include some inaccurate information about breast feeding, e.g. they say it has no nutritional benefits (does this mean a liquid containing protein and nutrients is the equivalent of a candy cane?) after one year and question if it will somehow delay the development of self comforting skills if the child is able to obtain comfort through nursing. With regard to sleeping through the night alone, they do not simply recommend it, they write that you are depriving your child of the opportunity to learn to self comfort along with a host of other reasons why they believe it can be harmful to comfort your chld at night without commenting on the possible benefits.
The bias is not in the questions they raise, but rather in the fact that they do not discuss opposing views. It seems to me that the reason the book elicits strong reactions is that it is probably the best one of its type available. The overall quality of the book makes these areas of bias where the authors state their position as gospel stand out as extremely disappointing to the reader who disagrees with the authors particular biases.
There are serious problems affecting children in our country and a high rate of violence among children and adults. We have school programs to teach empathy in an effort to decrease violence among older children. Perhaps this would not be as necessary if those we look to as experts counseled all new parents to show greater empathy to our children and to worry less about teaching our infants and toddlers to comfort themselves.
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What to Expect the Toddler Years, 2nd edition
What to Expect the Toddler Years, 2nd edition by Heidi Murkoff (Paperback - Nov. 22 2009)
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