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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The everstorm comes
Brandon Sanderson is a fantasy author in a million -- he crafts complex, intricate fantasy worlds, and gilds them with exquisitely evocative prose. But his greatest challenge thus far has to be "The Way of Kings," an older manuscript that he apparently dusted off, rewrote, and is now expanding into a vast fantasy epic. This is only the first book, and it's over a thousand...
Published on Oct. 14 2010 by E. A Solinas

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good story but do the protagonists have to be so tortured
The novel is typical Sanderson. Cool powers, dysfunctional political structure and a mystery that once unravelled that will explain how everything got so messed up. Anyway, these ingredients are mixed up in an interesting way once again to produce a solid piece of work. However, the characters did not capture me as well as they did in Warbreaker or the Mistworld saga. But...
Published 7 months ago by K. Griffin


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The everstorm comes, Oct. 14 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: The Way of Kings (Hardcover)
Brandon Sanderson is a fantasy author in a million -- he crafts complex, intricate fantasy worlds, and gilds them with exquisitely evocative prose. But his greatest challenge thus far has to be "The Way of Kings," an older manuscript that he apparently dusted off, rewrote, and is now expanding into a vast fantasy epic. This is only the first book, and it's over a thousand pages long.

It's pretty difficult to sum up the plot, since the cast is huge and aren't even in the same place. But long ago, the Radiants (sort of divine knights) once were sent by the Heralds to destroy the demonic Voidbringers. Then they turned against humanity, and begin warring over their godslaying Shardblades.

One part of the story follows Shallan, a desperate young noblewoman who is trying to save her family from ruin. So she seeks out the heretic princess Jasnah in hopes of becoming her attendant... but of course, she has her own secret motives to restore the family fortunes. Another follows Kaladin, a man enslaved in another land and with a shash glyph branded on his forehead.

And then there's Szeth, the "assassin in white" who killed Jasnah's father with a Shardblade, and Dalinar Kholin, the king's Highprince brother whose visions compel him to unite his people before the unthinkable happens. The oathpact has been shattered, and disaster is coming.

"The Way of Kings" is the sort of book that Robert Jordan should have written. The story is filled countless alien animals (they ride GIANT CRABS), mythologies, languages, magical systems and cultures, all with their own distinct quirks and characteristics. But Sanderson doesn't allow his story to be bogged down by the details -- instead he embroiders his elaborate plot with them.

The plot itself is almost confusingly complex, but slowly gels together as the story winds on and things start to make sense. And Sanderson paints the entire story in vivid, powerful prose ("His dreary feelings were like a black eel, coiled inside of him"). The one problem: it's so long and complex that casual readers will probably crumble after the first couple of chapters. This one needs some dedication.

And Sanderson shows his rare skill with characterization. He carefully fleshes out the main characters -- an aging warrior, a slave/soldier and a determined teenage girl -- and makes them all seem real and plausible. Kal is especially strong as a character, since Sanderson carefully develops the clash between his medical upbringing and his current job.

And there are countless striking supporting characters -- the young prince Adolin, the prickly and ruthless princess Jasnah, clever priests, and the acrobatic assassin Szeth, who is torn by his own crimes and sins.

"The Way of Kings" is a true epic -- grandiose, expansive, beautifully written... and only just the beginning of what is sure to be a vast, impressive series. It's a bit hard to just casually dip into, but the commitment is worth it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Classic Fantasy, Aug. 15 2014
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(a few minor spoilers)

This is an epic and classic fantasy tale by Brandon Sanderson. This is not Game of Thrones. Outside of the violence in the book this would be rated PG as there is no swearing and no sex. I call it a classic fantasy as it has mystical elements, strange creatures, magic, gods, religion and the characters are largely black and white. The good guy IS a good guy, much like The Lord of the Rings. I don’t have a problem with this. While it’s not a gritty tale it’s a very interesting one. There are two things I desire when reading a fantasy book – interesting characters and mystery. This book has both while maintaining a good and believable story (within its context). While many characters seem unconnected initially you start to see the web as the book rolls on and the mysterious events start to make sense.

This book is long at just over 1000 pages but I wouldn’t have cut any of it. I don’t like it when a book feels rushed. There are plenty of action scenes and while there are large stretches without battles the interactions, characters and story were more than enough to intrigue me. I finished this book in two weeks and really enjoyed it. While there are plenty of characters I never felt confused like some large ensemble books can be.

So what is this book actually about? One set of characters (Dholin family) focuses on the assassination of their King, the vengeance with regards to his death and finding out why. One main character (Kaladin) details his life and how he is betrayed by a superior and forced to live out a miserable life while trying to realize his potential which is great. One girl (Shallan) is trying to save her family and stumbles into something she doesn’t expect – mystery, magic and scholarship with an interesting tutor (more interesting than Shallan actually). One man (Szeth) is an assassin who uses magic to kill with special powers (I envision Neo in the Matrix at times) against his will as he must follow his master’s orders. All the characters are interesting. The history and legends of the Gods and protectors of this world are intriguing and there is so much left to explore after this book despite a satisfying ending.

Magic system? There aren’t wizards running around with magic wands but some people have Soulcasters that allow them to change things from one form to another. There are magical swords and armour that have great power. Some people have the ability to absorb Stormlight which gives them greater strength and abilities to fight. This is secondary to the characters and plot themselves imo.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book. While nothing completely blew me away I couldn’t stop reading. The second book is a must read for me.
4.5/5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent! I can't wait for the next one!, April 12 2013
I became interested in Sanderson's writing following his assistance in concluding the Wheel of Time series. I have not been disappointed. This book has hooked me from the start and the character development has been fantastic. I would definitely recommend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Beginning, March 6 2013
By 
A. Soares - See all my reviews
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Having not picked up a Sanderson book since his debut with Elantris (which was a good first novel, but nowhere close to as good as "The Way of Kings"), I was pleasantly surprised at how much this author has developed.

The Way of Kings is the brilliant beginning to what could be the best epic of our generation if the focus, character development and quality of writing in this book are carried through this series. The Way of Kings is a hefty read at over 1000 pages, but I promise, once you begin you will not be able to put it down.

The chapters in Way of Kings are broken up by different character perspectives. We have Shallan, Kaladin, Szeth, Dalinar Kholin. Shallan is a young woman trying to do dubious things to save her family from ruin. Her father has died, but left them with great debt, and she begins the story, attempting to become princess Jasnah's protegee in order to steal something very important to restore her family. Kaladin is a brave, honorable, slave who was once a soldier, but was betrayed and sold into slavery. Szeth is a Truthless and is bound to serve whoever holds his oathstone. Dalinar, is uncle to the king (and Jasnah). An honorable man, he suffers from visions of the past.

It's difficult to summarize the plot of this novel. Once the "Radiants" served the people, protecting them from the voidbringers. Long ago they abandoned their roles and enough time has passed that the people believe the danger has passed. Now, only their armour and weapons (Shardplates and Shardblades) remain - magical weapons that are prized and fought over.

In the beginning of the novel, Szeth assassinates Dalinar's brother, the King. Now his son, the new King, and his high princes are at war to avenge his father. Dalinar, the former king's brother, suffers from visions that urge him to unite the people before it is too late. The desolation may be coming and, this time, there are no Radiants to protect the people.

5 stars. Everything is aligned in this novel. The characters are fascinating, the writing is excellent and the plot is intriguing. There is certainly enough material in this world for an epic series. In this, we get a glimpse into the history of the world and the history of the main characters (and are introduced to many more who may prove to be major players in later books). Brandon Sanderson - I want more of this and fast! I can't wait to see if the rest of this series lives up to the promise of the first.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The next epic, Feb. 6 2013
This review is from: The Way of Kings (Hardcover)
This novel was excellent. Along with Brandon Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy, he created a unique fantasy world that is highly entertaining to read into. Nothing is copied from other Sci-Fi or fantasy stories. Can not wait for Sanderson to continue this series now that Wheel of Time is ended.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, Sept. 13 2010
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This review is from: The Way of Kings (Hardcover)
This book is brilliant and I thoroughly enjoyed it. It is over a thousand pages long, but I read it fairly quickly because it is so good. It is one of those books that makes you wonder how long until the sequel comes out.

Some modest criticisms:
1. Sanderson is not above the usual weird use of italics that fantasy writers sometimes use. I mean, if you want to add emphasis to a sentence, don't have the italicised word do the heavy lifting. Don't italicise "had" "was" "really" etc.

2. Sometimes Sanderson ends a chapter on a cliff hanger and then starts the next chapter with a new character in a new setting. I consider that a rather amaturish tactic to keep readers reading. His writing is good enough that he doesn't need to resort to that.

But Sanderson's world building, plotting, characters, magic systems, descriptions are beautiful, complex, fascinating. I loved some of the simple descriptions juxtaposed with the grand ones. Like how Kal steps out of the baracks and his bare feet notice the difference between the cold cement of the baracks and the hot rocks outside. I thought that was a brilliant description that a lesser writer wouldn't be bothered with putting in.
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5.0 out of 5 stars another great world invented by BS, July 8 2014
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complex interwoven plot aspects, rich cultural and historical architecture for the story; confusing jumping around at times
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5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing Story!, July 3 2014
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An interesting, complex, exciting tale. it was a bit challenging to read through the first chapter or two, but then the story flew. The parts I didn't get fully at the beginning were integrated & explained in more detail later in the book - causing lots of "aahs, that explains it". I'm onto the next book now & am even more intrigued with this series! Hard to put down.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, June 5 2014
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I chose this rating because the novel is close to Martin's Game of Thrones in that it kept me entertained and interested. I didn't find my attention wandering although some of the battle scenes were a bit too long for my liking. Characters are well developed as is the plot and the setting.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic & Detailed Fantasy!, May 22 2014
I was skeptical coming into this. My first taste of Brandon Sanderson was the Mistborn trilogy. It was really good and I thought, 'he can't top this'. I'll reduce the suspense a bit here, he didn't but the story is definitely not over yet and I have a feeling it could surpass Mistborn.

The character development is so detailed that even though there were drawn out portions where I thought I knew the point of the excercise, I really didn't. That was a classic Sanderson for you - as I've learned from the forums – he gives you a nibble of brocolli and then pie's you in the face with Strawberry Rubarb. So unexpected but by the end you're laughing along with the private jokes.

World building is another one of Brandon Sanderson's feats. It began a little confusing at first, then it all unfolded within a few short chapters (and pictures!) as a new, unique world. I wish I would have read “Warbringer” before this one so it's on the “list” as I'm told I should keep an eye out for a certain witty individual.

Like Mistborn, this isn't disappointing though I hold a special place in my mind for Vin and her comrades. I'm very pleased that, I think, Kaladin and Shallan will be favorite characters very soon.

(Full Review on The Reader's Hollow blog)
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The Way of Kings
The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson (Hardcover - Aug. 31 2010)
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