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10 Reviews
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sort of like Harry Potter meets Anne of Green Gables...
A Hogwarts-type school at the turn of the century! What an intruiging idea!
Though this book starts out a little campy, with the main character gathering eggs on a small farm, and continues with some very pegan-like philosophy about magic, I found myself thoroughly enjoying "A School for Sorcery." Sabin's style is simple and lyrical, and her story has just...
Published on Jan. 3 2004 by TAHINAZ

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars This School gets a "C" in my book
The title is quick to draw eager Harry Potter fans to its place on a bookshelf, and the whimsical cover may appear quirky and magical, but for fans of other "schools of sorcery", this novel may be disapointing.
A School for Sorcery focuses on an alternate universe based on late 19th century Europe where magic is common. Sabin's characters are original enough, but...
Published on Feb. 2 2004 by liaden


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4.0 out of 5 stars I give it 4.5---> Very Good Book, July 20 2004
By 
Madi (Fantasy Land) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Mass Market Paperback)
This book was about a coming of age fantasy. Tria has just entered into The school for sorcery and nothing is as she expected. The teachers are dull, just like the school and the students are strange especially a mysterious boy - Oryon, who wants to be the most powerful one, he kidnaps her boyfriend and her and her troublesome roommate Lina must rescue him in a year or they'll never be seen again.........
It's a very good book, It's hard to put down, I can't wait to read the other book by this author "A Perilous Power"
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1.0 out of 5 stars No Creativity and Lack of Beef, April 11 2004
By 
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Mass Market Paperback)
This is one of the worst book that I have read for this kind of gender. It is clearly inspired by Harry Potter but not in a good way. I guess it could be good for kids but for adults and young adults, who are hoping to fine something magical like Harry. Please skip this book.
The vocabulary and way of showing things are also horribly done. If you want to get this book, please get it at the library, and don't waste your money like I did.,
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3.0 out of 5 stars This School gets a "C" in my book, Feb. 2 2004
By 
"liaden" (Somewhere Over the Rainbow) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Mass Market Paperback)
The title is quick to draw eager Harry Potter fans to its place on a bookshelf, and the whimsical cover may appear quirky and magical, but for fans of other "schools of sorcery", this novel may be disapointing.
A School for Sorcery focuses on an alternate universe based on late 19th century Europe where magic is common. Sabin's characters are original enough, but somewhat undefined; their pasts, though hinted at, are never discussed. Going in depth into an exciting magical world, what Rowling did so well with Harry Potter, Sabin fails to do with School; the reader is left completely in the dark mysterious land.
It begins as Tria and her mother secretly send Tria to Simonton School for the Magically Gifted, for Tria's rare magic to be trained. Her father scorns her gift, and Tria's mother is forced to spend all her savings to pay for tuition. When Tria arrives, the school appears to be in disrepair; everything is dusty and old, and much different than the broshure. The food is bad, her vain roommate randomly turns into a panther, and mysterious students Oryan and Kress have a deadly scheme. Now she must save her love Wilce from the clutches of the Dire Women within a year or Oryan will take over the school and all the students will suffer.
This book teaches an artful lesson about looking beyond the obvious and what's on the inside. Sabin should be acknowledged for her beautiful use of imagery and symbolism, however, the book contained flaws as well. Tria is a strong heroine, but younger readers will not be able to appreciate the intricate plot that brings out these qualities. The plot is both thrilling and darkly brilliant, as Tria discovers herself and her magical powers.
This book is a good read for someone who reads a great deal; for those who like a good book only once in a while, keep searching. I reccomend books such as Ella Enchanted(Levine), Witch Week(Wynne Jones), or Dragon's Milk (Fletcher) instead.Nevertheless, fantasy fans of Anne of Green Gables would appreciate this novel as would avid readers. Its paperback edition makes it affordable enough that you can read it and pass it on to a friend.
So, 3 stars for originality (despite the whole Harry-Potter-but-not thing) in the plot and characters, and the other two left off for lack of character development and interest. Happy Reading!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sort of like Harry Potter meets Anne of Green Gables..., Jan. 3 2004
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
A Hogwarts-type school at the turn of the century! What an intruiging idea!
Though this book starts out a little campy, with the main character gathering eggs on a small farm, and continues with some very pegan-like philosophy about magic, I found myself thoroughly enjoying "A School for Sorcery." Sabin's style is simple and lyrical, and her story has just enough unusual aspects to carry the reader through untill you begin to realize that the seemingly predictable plot is not what it seems!
I finished this book in two days. It was excellant.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Page Turning Read!, Nov. 5 2002
By 
A. Wallace (VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
I met Ms. Sabin at a signing and couldn't resist buying this book. I also found that I couldn't put it down once I started reading it. A wonderful tale, one that in the beginning sent me back in time, of tales I recalled as a young girl, from Cinderella to Dirty Dancing. What a great coming of age story with bewitching twists. Danger, power, mirror reflections, teen-love, and some pretty scary stuff as well. A truly enjoyable read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Teaches nothing new, Nov. 2 2002
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
In a wave of reprints and new books about wizards-in-training, E. Rose Sabin's "School For Sorcery" is nothing to write home about. With moderately endearing characters and a somewhat underexploited storyline, it fails to live up to its potential. It's not a bad book, it's just not a particularly good book.
Tria Tesserell has always had magical gifts, but living in a small village with a strict father and cowed mother has never given her room to exercise those gifts. So she is thrilled to go to the Lesley Simonton School for the Magically Gifted. Until she arrives, that is -- there are few students, grimy buildings, tiny rooms and stern teachers. Tria breaks an important rule (folding time) within a few hours of arriving, and her roommate is Lina, a charmingly nasty panther-girl who proceeds to make life difficult -- and not just for Tria.
But the two girls have to put their differences aside on the night of a formal dance. There, a pair of male students, Oryon and Kress, bring in beautiful masked women -- who reveal themselves to be demonic Dire Women. The Dire Women snatch up a pair of young boys and escape the school. The Headmistress is unable to stop Oryon or bring back the boys -- and it falls to Tria and her pals to bring them back.
"School For Sorcery" has an adequate plot, adequate writing, adequate characters, and adequate dialogue. The key word there is "adequate." has a lot of the standard boarding-school characters and problems. As a result, it ends up retreading a lot of the same territory as the Harry Potter and "College of Magics" books. The universe that Sabin writes is also rather undefined. Is this fictional world an alternate universe or a separate fantasy world? It's never entirely clear.
The writing is fairly standard, ranging from extremely descriptive to painfully stark, and it lacks the lushness of Emily Drake's writing, or the entertaining zip of Diana Wynne-Jones'. There seems to be a bit of an anti-male streak, as virtually all the men are ineffectual, bigoted or evil. The dialogue is a bit of a problem; it's often more than a little stilted (hasn't anyone in this book ever heard of contractions?) and this becomes especially distracting during dramatic moments. And some readers may not be keen on the heroines summoning a demonic Dire Woman in a rather sinister ritual that involves animal sacrifice and a pentagram.
Tria herself is a fairly ordinary heroine. There is nothing to really set her apart or make her special, except for her rather vaguely-defined powers. Nubba will gain more sympathy from readers, between her hysterical fits and teasing from her classmates. Other girls such as Kathyn and Taner don't reaklly display any individual characteristics aside from "angry sister" and "tough warrior-woman"; they don't detract from the plot, but they don't add to it either. Oryon at first seems like a promising villain, but he quickly descends into blatant mustache-twirling.
If you're an older Harry Potter fan waiting for the next book, you won't find what you crave in this rather lackluster first novel. It has all the trappings of a ripping good fantasy, but never rises high enough to be better than "okay."
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4.0 out of 5 stars An entertaing new fantasy novel, Oct. 8 2002
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
It seems that ever since JK Rowling's fantastic Harry Potter series hit the shelves, we have received book after book of child and teen fantasy novels. It seems that everyone is trying to out-Potter each other. In some cases these "novels" can turn out to be embarrassingly bad. Fortunately this is not the case. A School for Sorcery by E. Rose Sabin is a thrilling novel about what happened if Harry Potter was female, a few years older, and in a completely different world.
Tria Tesserell is a 16-year-old farmer's daughter who has always known that she had had some magic gifts. Unfortunately, because of her close minded father, she has been forced to keep her powers hidden. But when she gets accepted to the Lesley Simonton School for the Magically Gifted she is thrilled. She won't have to keep her powers hidden any longer. But her enthusiasm is diminished when she actually gets to the campus. The buildings are crumbling, the hallway seems to be covered in a thick layer of dust and grime, and the food is old and stale. Tria gets in trouble right away when one of her powers she never knew she possessed works without her even knowing it. To top it off Tria's new roommate is a witch in more ways than one. Tria feels as if she can never learn to love this school. And just when she start's getting used to it and things start looking up a darker more sinister evil takes into play. Oryon, a second year student, has summoned an evil source that has kidnapped two of Tria's fellow students and friends. It looks like Tria is the only one that can save them, but she doesn't even know how.
I was unsure whether to give this book 4 stars of 5. There were many good qualities. The author manages to take a familiar scene (a magic school) and take it in a completely different direction. The characters are amusing and sometimes scary. And the emphasis in this book is more on ethical magic than breaking the rules for the greater good (like in Harry Potter). Still there are a few plot holes. Because there are so many characters many of them get introduced and seem like they will become large parts in the books. Instead they merely vanish about halfway through the book. But beyond that this book is great. I hope to see more works of fantasy from E. Rose Sabin, maybe in this world. I recommend it to fans of JK Rowling and Diane Wynne Jones.
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4.0 out of 5 stars witches, after all, are feminine, Sept. 22 2002
By 
Charles L. Fontenay (st. petersburg, fl United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
The strong point of this tale is that it is about a teen-aged GIRL. When my Kipton series of mysteries was published, featuring a teen-aged girl and her teddy bear on Mars, my daughter said she wished they'd been available when she was a girl, because for decently written teen-aged adventures she had to rely on the Hardy Boys and other books featuring male heroes. Sabin, a member of my writers' club, has done young feminine readers a favour.
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5.0 out of 5 stars teenage Potter-like tale, Sept. 14 2002
By 
Harriet Klausner - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
Tria has resigned herself to working on a farm and marrying a farmer but thanks to the machinations of her mother she is going to the Simonton School for the Magically Gifted. When she first arrives she is very disappointed because it is a run down place with few students. Her roommate is a selfish, conniving and untrustworthy minx who gets out of work duty and sets one boy against another.

Over time, Tria adjusts and even has a date for the mid-winder festival. That happy occasion turns to tragedy when her enemy Oryon uses his considerable powers to send Tria date and his friend into the realm of the Dire Women, dark spirits who dwell in another dimension. Tria has a lot of power but she fears she won't be able to learn how to use it in time to save her friends.

E. Rose Sabin is a gifted storyteller whose debut novel will appeal to the J.K. Rowling crowd, as this novel is a teenage Potter-like tale. The protagonist is a thoroughly likable young woman who makes mistakes and learns from them. Her adventures in the school and her interactions with other students make for fascinating reading. It is hoped that this is only the first novel in what could be a great series.

Harriet Klausner
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5.0 out of 5 stars Better Plotted than HP books!, Aug. 30 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: A School for Sorcery (Hardcover)
With the protagonist being a teenager, this book is obviously aimed at the teens that first cut their teeth on HP but now need more meat. And they get it! The twists (plot twists & twists of objects in the book) is just grand. The best part is you don't see the end coming, yet it fits perfectly.
The various types of magic ability are much more thought out and well developed (and believable) than HP's, it impacts the plot and characters more. Because of their own ethics characters use and misuse magic and learn lessons from their mistakes.
And it is also a very rare story these days: a GIRL'S coming of age.
Well done.
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A School for Sorcery
A School for Sorcery by E. Rose Sabin (Mass Market Paperback - Aug. 18 2003)
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