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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better after the film
Saw the film. Got curious, bought the book and was really surprise. It explains a lot and I could not put the book down. Well written, complicated, yet simple to read. A must.
Published 3 months ago by ET

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read
Different. Not what I thought it would be when I bought it. But interesting enough to carry on to the sequel.
Published 7 months ago by Lee Simmons


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better after the film, Dec 24 2013
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Saw the film. Got curious, bought the book and was really surprise. It explains a lot and I could not put the book down. Well written, complicated, yet simple to read. A must.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rightfully considered a masterpiece, Feb. 19 2006
By 
William E. Hunter "Ummagumma" (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Ender's Game (Paperback)
For years I've wanted to read this book; it is considered one of the classic works of SF. Recently I did, and surprisingly enough, I wasn't disappointed.

It tells the story of Andrew Wiggin, the Third child of a family living in a future, overpopulated world where families are restricted to only two offspring; except where traits of extraordinary intelligence in the youngsters leads the government to believe that a budding military genius might be in the offing, one who can lead the armies of the Earth in a hopeless battle against a ruthless Alien species. Andrew, nicknamed Ender by his loving sister Valentine and despised by his sadistic brother Peter, shows so much promise that he is whisked away at the tender age of six to an orbiting Battle School by military men unsure whether he will even survive the training, let alone actual battle.

While author OSC maintains a sparse descriptive style with the surroundings, he concentrates on filling out Ender into a living, breathing person of many facets who we feel deeply for as he is thrown into a grinding military program out to wring the last bit of humanity from him.

I loved how easily this book read, while at the same time presenting some serious ethical issues and allowing us to truly enter the mind of a child progeny and experience his arduous journey along side him. I'm not the only one as well; my wife, curious as to what was keeping my nose in the book for long stretches at a time, perused the first few pages and then delved headlong into the book right behind me. I ended up fighting for reading time just so I could finish before her!

Ender's Game is a terrific read; being touching, rollicking, and insightful all at the same time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, Feb. 28 2014
By 
Ryan Scragg (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan) - See all my reviews
One of the better books I have read in my life. This was my third read through it and I will probably read it again. Very well written, especially about Enders feelings and emotions throughout the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this book is awesome I love it, Dec 23 2013
By 
Bruce (Calgary, AB) - See all my reviews
How their are so many swears in Enders game
I liked ender's game theirs so many. Details it' so awesome
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just as I remembered it, only deeper, Dec 19 2013
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I read Ender's Game when I was 20. Now, 23 years later it has all the same memories but now the characters and stories mean so much more. A great read then. A better read now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enders game, Dec 19 2013
This book is my favourite book.I would reccomend tthis book to anyone.This book is awsome i read it in 2 days.This book is exciting but also sad i almost cried in the begging
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, Dec 18 2013
By 
L. D. "L. D" (Alberta, Canada) - See all my reviews
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Perhaps it was the fact that the main character Ender (Andrew Wiggin) is a INFJ (net research found that result) that I really connected with the character. It was a good read though the ending a bit surprising when you lose count of how far you read into the book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Enders justify the means, Feb. 24 2014
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Ender's Game (Paperback)
Ender Wiggin is a very unusual boy -- he's a brilliant tactician, a genius, and a despised "third" in a future that only allows two children. He's also six years old.

And despite the fact that Orson Scott Card's sci-fi classic is about a little boy learning how to be a warrior, "Ender's Game" is a pretty gripping and sometimes grim adventure story. The descriptions of children being taught out how to be cold-blooded warriors is pretty creepy, but the well-developed future world that Card comes up with is pretty awesome.

After a fight with a gang of bullies, Ender Wiggin is approached by an army officer who wants him to join the elite Battleschool, where kid geniuses become soldiers -- basically because aliens are about to attack Earth AGAIN and may end up wiping out the human race. His brother Peter is too wild and cruel, and his beloved sister Valentine is too mild-mannered.

Ender accepts, and quickly finds himself in a dog-eat-dog space school where he soon becomes loathed for the special treatment the teachers occasionally give him -- when they aren't observing his every move. And it soon becomes obvious that Ender has a natural ability that exceeds that of most of the Battleschool recruits: he instinctively knows how to outmaneuver his opponents and protect himself in a fight, even if he annoys some of the "army" commanders who don't like being outshone.

Back on Earth, his brother and sister try to alter the increasingly unstable politics of Earth by subtle manipulation of the public, a situation that may bring the ruthless Peter into greater power. And as Ender reaches the end of his training, he faces both the buggers and the knowledge of what he is capable of.

"Ender's Game" is kind of an unusual space opera, because the actual war between humans and buggers is not front-and-center until the last act of the story. Up until then, it's about following Ender and his equally unusual siblings as they develop prematurely into adulthood -- these are genius kids who can reshape entire worlds, but you're not really sure that they SHOULD.

Card writes in a detailed but brisk style, with pretty realistic dialogue and some ugly dark spots (the description of Peter flaying a squirrel... for no reason). Ender's time at Battle School and Command School feel rather slow at times, only for things to blossom in the final laps of the novel -- Card suddenly turns all our feelings and expectations on their heads. The tragedy of children turned into soldiers becomes even more tragic as we discover what the war is actually all about.

As you'd expect from Fascist Hogwarts In Space, there are a lot of kids at Battle School who are developed to certain degrees. But the center of the story is Ender himself -- and despite being a tactical genius with loads of natural ability, Ender never seems like a Wesley Crusher. Like a boy destined to be a Spartan warrior, his inborn skills are what will keep him from ever finding peace. His childhood is sacrificed for war.

The other part of the story rests on Peter and Valentine -- Valentine is too nice, while Peter is gradually revealed to be a ruthless genius who works anything and anyone for his goals, which may or may not be self-serving. It's oddly fun to see the growing influence of "Demosthenes" and "Locke" on the cruel government.

"Ender's Game" is an intelligent, gripping space opera with an undercurrent of intense tragedy -- it's kind of slow at times, but the strong writing and intriguing main trio keep it afloat.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Do not over look the introduction., Dec 15 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
I bought the paperback. A paperback is not the easiest thing to wield, so I also bought the kindle version. I always make sure that it is Text-to-Speech Enabled and it helps to be X-Ray Enabled.

Then to my surprise the kindle version offered Whispersync for Voice so I could not pass the opportunity. The Whispersync starts out on the first page of the book and bypasses the introduction. I read the introduction from the paperback and found it be backing up from where the kindle started.

The kindle version also has the beginning chapter from the next book in the series (Speaker for the Dead) this section also works with the Whispersync.

The reason I mentioned the introduction is because it is as important as the book it's self. It gives a background of the author and a quick how to write a novel course. Orson Scott Card said that the introduction can be passed but I would not do it.

I know this is not really focused on the military; however he nails many of the situations. From commander's intent to training and target of opportunity I felt that I was in the BNCOC and ANCOC while reading the story.

The story takes place in the future. The enemy attacked humankind twice and maybe a third time is on the horizon. We are looking for a great leader as the ones form the past to carry us to victory. The question is how to go about finding and preparing the person for the future. We are more interested in Andrew "Ender" Wiggin's relationship to family, and the people around him. The big picture is finding out whom / what we are.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great book!, Dec 10 2013
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Fantastic story, with a twist. Card is brilliant in oh he gets inside a child mind. I cannot wait to start the next one.
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Ender's Game
Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (Mass Market Paperback - Feb. 18 2002)
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