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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on May 31, 2009
I have been following the machinations of the Canadian HRC's from here in Australia. Why, you might ask?
There is a push here from the usual suspects for a Bill of Rights and beefed up commissions to enforce those 'rights'. Canada and Australia are pretty similar places, so it is handy to be able to point to Canada's experience and show otherwise apathetic Australians that we too could be staring down this barrel.
I agree with Ezra that the best option is to uproot these organisations altogether. They may start off modest and reasonable, but in the nature of things they will always be prone to mission creep. Worst of all they become stuffed with left wing activists. After all there is nowhere else for these people to go - they clearly couldn't survive in the private sector. These activists then use the unaccountable nature of the commissions to push their surreal agenda, an agenda that would never get through legislatures mindful of their electorates.
Those minimalists who suggest that removal of the Section 13 'hate crimes' provisions would be sufficient could perhaps explain how this would help the gym owner who wanted to keep a (pre-operation) transvestite out of the womens' showers, or the restaurateur who wanted to keep a persistent dope-smoker away from his paying customers.
No, I see the current state of the HRC's as the logical and inevitable endpoint of such structures. They are inherently broke.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 26, 2011
A frightening and entertaining review of a little know collection of autocratic tribunals that contravenes every noble tenant of western civilization. George Orwell comes to life in Canada and Ezra Levant tells us how. A must read for every citizen.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 25, 2012
As a Canadian, I have to admit that I was not at all familiar with the human rights commissions in Canada until I picked up this book. In a way, Ezra Levant's book really opened my eyes to this parallel system operating outside our legal framework. The book was a quick read, and it was written well. It was emotionally charged however and of course coming from someone who has had a long reputation in Canada for his extreme right-wing leanings, I was not surprised. There is no doubt that the book is biased as I did not catch the other side of the coin, at least not directly. Certainly, Mr. Levant was fixed on venting his frustration and his anger at the human rights commissions, especially after the ordeal he went through. He had an axe to grind and he was able to do so successfully through this book.

There is no question that the HRCs are a flawed system, and I agree with Levant that some of the cases that got the green light through HRCs would never have seen the light of day in a true court system. It's true that some of these complainants did not have any standing or a real cause of action had they filed an actual lawsuit. Because it doesn't cost a penny to file papers with an HRC, I agree with Levant's argument that it is prone to abuse. Indeed, the strange characters in his book are opportunists. The HRCs represent a parallel universe that serves an escape mechanism for those who want to dodge the painstaking process of a real lawsuit. In a way, HRCs are unfair and undermine Canadian values if they can be abused by people introduced in this book.

On the other hand, it seems that he cherry picked the most ridiculous cases to prove his point. The average Canadian will not file a complaint with the HRC because he or she is required to wash hands at work. It's not everyday we run into overly sensitive imams. He paints a very pessimistic picture of humanity. There are dozens of cases filed with the HRCs and in the end, even Levant admits that certain cases are reasonable (see Chapter 9). But that defeats his argument that HRCs should be abolished altogether. I think that the HRCs are a vestige of our past when discrimination was at its peak whether based on gender, sexual orientation or race. Society has evolved since then. People should be encouraged to seek other avenues of relief rather than turning to a government bureaucracy staffed by people who do not have the knowledge and experience to adjudicate these cases. I think HRCs should be used as a last resort when all else has failed. I am not advocating that the HRCs should be eliminated but only that they should take a back seat to other systems.

Overall, I think my review of this book is favourable. The book should be required reading for both the average reader and government policy makers. I commend Mr. Levant for bringing attention to this very important issue. I think sometimes we need a crusader like him, someone who isn't afraid to speak the truth.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Who is looking out for the freedom of thought and speech of all Canadians. Ezra is. Great to see someone stand up to the dictates of the Human Rights Commission, and who exposes their idiotic tendency to pummel us with political correctness while taking away our God given right to voice our dissent and opinions. I wish they could do away with this commission, and let Canadians display our values of consideration and politeness the way we always have, on our own.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on May 13, 2009
I could only read this book once. It's like a horror story. I'm truly ashamed to be Canadian. Good luck Ezra.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on May 25, 2009
This book should be required reading for all Canadians.
We thought this miscarriage of justice only happened in third world countries.
What an eye-opener to learn it's happening right in our own country.
It's shocking!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 2009
The book is an excellent review of the shortcomings and absolute corruption in Canada's Human Rights Commissions and Tribunals. The book is a must-read for anyone that does not realize that these Organizations are the absolute antipodes of human rights. Ezra Levant writes from his own personal experiences as well as the experiences of other victims of actual human rights denormalization by the Provincial as well as Federal bodies of these non- judicial bureauocracies.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 24, 2010
Every Canadian should have and read this book. If you care about free speech; about your way of life; about the abuse of Human Right's processes; or about the abuse of government power and your tax dollars - read this book and be very, very concerned.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Incompetent and corrupt kangaroo courts in Canada are egregiously violating civil rights in the name of "human rights".

I read this book straight through in one very long evening, and I very rarely do that with a book over 200 pages long.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 24, 2009
This book is a real eye opener on control by a government.
It seems to me a person should have a "right" to their opinion, as long as it is not a personal attack. Where are all our so called "rights" disappearing to?
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