Customer Reviews


24 Reviews
5 star:
 (10)
4 star:
 (10)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Noble Journey
Rohinton Mistry's novel, Such a Long Journey, is an engrossing and provocative tale. The main character Gustad Noble is aptly named, for here is a man of true nobility--not by birth, but by his being, his determination, and his goodness. This novel is truly a journey, and Mistry takes us by the hand, guiding us into the unfamiliar cultural landscape of India, taking us...
Published on Nov. 2 2001 by ben white

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A good debut
I read this book after I read "A Fine Balance", and it goes to show (happily) that Mistry's writing style has developed and become much more interesting. Journey is the story of one man, Gustad Noble, facing a set of challenges in Bombay in 1971 (the year of the war with Pakistan.) Mistry also tells several different stories as the characters weave in and out of...
Published on March 9 2002 by Edward Aycock


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Noble Journey, Nov. 2 2001
By 
ben white (louisville, tn United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
Rohinton Mistry's novel, Such a Long Journey, is an engrossing and provocative tale. The main character Gustad Noble is aptly named, for here is a man of true nobility--not by birth, but by his being, his determination, and his goodness. This novel is truly a journey, and Mistry takes us by the hand, guiding us into the unfamiliar cultural landscape of India, taking us along with Gustad and his family as they struggle with all the assaults of being human, as they strive to sustain their way of life on the verge of a changing, evolving society.
Mistry's characters are real; they're developed as individuals and they stand seperatly--from the main character Gustad Noble to his upstairs neighbor who barks, literally, at the moon. When one of many of Mistry's characters dances their way onto this carefully wrought stage, he or she envelopes the reader--we don't wait for this scene to finish in order to get to the meat of the matter--we relax, we sift slowly with the writing as we're there with each of the characters' struggles.
This is a book of enormity. This is a book that when finished, regret sets in. The last few pages dangle themselves out, and when the last word is read and the book closed, the reader has a sense that this one is special, that there aren't many like this one, and that it's too bad, really, that it's over.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Such a Long Journey, an Amazon purchase., May 3 2012
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
The story is fantastic, all Mistry's books are so well written in my opinion. He is a natural story teller but my feeling is this is what India is! A vast place, with a government that cannot cope with the distances or population numbers. His protagonist is trying his very best each day whilst a series of events work against him, or his way of life. I enjoyed this book immensely. Recommend 100%
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Mistry Creates Realistic, Compelling Characters, April 10 2000
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
The characters in this novel are so realistic and captivating, you will feel to compelled follow their daily lives in this excellent, heart-warming story. Mistry provides insight into the thoughts and actions of a middle-class,hard-working Indian family man with such depth, and the descriptions of the settings are so accurate and detailed. Every character, minor or major, has a story of their own and we see both sides of each conflict. Truly a must-read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Neither Pretentious nor Formulaic, Nov. 28 2011
By 
Lorina Stephens (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
Rohinton Mistry's Such a Long Journey is one of those remarkable confluences of astonishingly beautiful writing, tightly crafted plot, and fully-developed characterization. The work is neither pretentious nor formulaic. And although there is no major crisis that takes place, no earth-shattering destruction of place or person, there is a sustained tension throughout the novel that keeps you reading, that draws you into the life of the main protagonist, Gustad Noble.

The novel is set during the rule of Indira Gandhi, and is a damning indictment of both her government and American foreign policy of the time. The journey is both a physical and metaphorical one, of Gustad's bedside visitation of a friend he thought had betrayed him, and of Gustad's eventual realization that there are few absolutes in life beyond that of death, that for every face there are a myriad of facets.

There are several subtle but poignant metaphors woven throughout this narrative, the most memorable being the character of Tehmul, who is a physically and mentally disabled man with the character of a boy, and it is this pull of the innocent versus the carnal that mirrors much of the political and social turmoil of the novel.
Although short-listed for the 1991 Booker Prize, Such a Long Journey was pulled from the University of Mumbai's English curriculum because of protests from the family of Hindu nationalist, Bal Thackeray - yet one more example in the world of unenlightened people nurturing fear-mongering.

I'd urge you to read Such a Long Journey. It is a story that will nestle in your psyche and remain.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Read, Dec 20 2001
By 
Robert E. Olsen (McLean, VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
This interesting first novel tackles several long journeys -- India's transformation from the raj to a brawling, corrupt, mismanaged, constantly at-war democracy under Indira Gandhi; Bombay resident Gustad Noble's economic decline from a kind of family prominence and prosperity under the Brits; and, most directly, Noble's rise in understanding, breadth of spirit, friendship, and accommodation to what India has become, warts and all.
Readers who delight in plot development may be disappointed. There are plots and subplots of sorts in this book -- will Noble's son reject a shot at an engineering degree? will his daughter regain her health? will a former neighbor, now in New Delhi, be found out as a good guy or a bad guy? will a prized homage to spirituality survive the wrecker's ball? will the bank manager learn the truth about some misguided deposits and spill the beans? will the simpleton get the, uh, girl? -- but, to me at least, these stories appear and drift away without careful crafting or much urgency in the telling. Rather, Mistry uses his plot lines more as opportunities to describe modern Indian society, in its complexity, and Noble's passage through it.
Mistry's central characters are full, interesting, and idiosyncratic. His minor characters -- the politically active prostitutes, the apartment dweller practicing the black arts, the bureaucrats and politicians, the speedtalking simpleton -- are persons we have seen before. Excellent political satire sometimes veers toward cartoons. Still, sentence by sentence, Mistry writes well and with sensitivity to his characters' inner lives.
This is not world-class fiction, but it is a good read, especially for persons with an international bent who are not put off by detail.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Journey short of a Fine Balance, May 23 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
Having read "A Fine Balance" first, which is a masterpiece, I was hoping for an equally enthralling novel. "Journey" is a great read no doubt about it. Funny in parts, sad in others. I do highly recommend it. If you haven't read "Balance", you'll love this book..if you've read "Balance" you will just really enjoy this novel. Still, it is a must read !
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars A good debut, March 9 2002
By 
Edward Aycock (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
I read this book after I read "A Fine Balance", and it goes to show (happily) that Mistry's writing style has developed and become much more interesting. Journey is the story of one man, Gustad Noble, facing a set of challenges in Bombay in 1971 (the year of the war with Pakistan.) Mistry also tells several different stories as the characters weave in and out of Gustad's life. Some of it works, some of it doesn't. You can predict some of the fates of the characters right from the beginning. But Mistry has written a solid book, and shows the promise that he fulfilled quite nicely in a Fine Balance.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Such a Beautiful Read, Jan. 15 2002
By 
M. Harris (United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
Mistry is a modern author whose writing compares to author's of "the Great Books". Such a Long Journey gives a stunning idea of life during Indira Gandhi's reign. Besides the cultural lesson on India you receive from reading this book, you also come away with the struggles of loyalty a man faces with friendship and family. This book is not as engaging as A Fine Balance, but a wonderful read nonetheless.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Masterpiece, March 16 2000
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
A gem of the book about the trials and tribulations of the ordinary folk in India. This is also an intelligent commantary on Indira Gandhi's India
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 5 stars for our Deekra !, March 14 2000
By 
Aninda Mitra (Philadelphia, USA (bombayite by heart)) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Such a Long Journey (Paperback)
Superb story-telling. Engrossing, intricate, humorous, ironic, and more. Takes one back to older, gentler, days in Bombay - when the very character of Bombay began to change. A citywide-character defined primarily by the pioneering Parsi influence that played such an immense role in Bombay's, growth and development. Mistry gives us some sense of these cataclysmic changes in mores, values, outlook - all in the microcosm of the Khodadad building (a residential apt. complex of middle-class Parsi families)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Such a Long Journey
Such a Long Journey by Rohinton Mistry (Paperback - Nov. 3 1993)
CDN$ 14.95 CDN$ 10.79
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews