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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Subversive at the time, mild today
When British director Michael Powell and screenwriter Leo Marks collaborated on the 1960 film "Peeping Tom," the two really thought they had something special. The movie about a mentally unstable young man caught in the clutches of his father's psychological experiments horrified audiences and critics alike. Obscene, depraved, wildly inappropriate--these were...
Published on Jan. 5 2004 by Jeffrey Leach

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a film ahead of its time
This review is for the Criterion Collection DVD edition of the film.
This movie directed by Michael Powell, (after severing ties with longtime business partner, Emeric Pressburger) was highly controversial and almost cost him his career. The film was taken from theaters after only a week and was rarely distributed.
In the film a young filmmaker interested in...
Published on May 9 2004 by Ted


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Subversive at the time, mild today, Jan. 5 2004
By 
Jeffrey Leach (Omaha, NE USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
When British director Michael Powell and screenwriter Leo Marks collaborated on the 1960 film "Peeping Tom," the two really thought they had something special. The movie about a mentally unstable young man caught in the clutches of his father's psychological experiments horrified audiences and critics alike. Obscene, depraved, wildly inappropriate--these were only a few of the milder labels attached to the film. The movie played less than a week in cinema houses throughout Britain before disappearing. Powell, come to find out, was so devastated by the response to his movie that he promptly left England for Australia, never to return. In our crazy modern world, what people thought horribly twisted yesterday has an allure beyond reckoning for today's cranks. Thus, "Peeping Tom" has now become a movie lionized by modern filmmakers, students of film history, and critics. The Criterion Collection's release of the movie goes so far as to call Powell's film a "British 'Psycho.'" Well, I wouldn't go that far, but the movie is intriguing considering the date of its release (1960) and the subject matter it fearlessly tackles.
Mark Lewis (Carl Boehm) spends his days working the cameras at a film studio and his nights moonlighting as pin-up photographer and documentarian. He always carries a camera wherever he goes, photographing seemingly mundane objects as buildings and people. Lewis seems like a harmless sort of chap, but the dark secrets swirling in his mind would give the stoutest soul pause. He is a Peeping Tom, always gazing into windows or using his camera to spy on the intimate details of other people's lives. His illness seems to come from his childhood, when his famous psychologist father used Mark as a test subject in his work on human fears. Father would set up a camera in different rooms of the house, along with a tape recorder, and proceed to torment his son in various ways in order to monitor the boy's reaction. At some point in the proceedings, young Mark equated women with his terror fits, and as a full grown man he has decided to conduct his own amateur experiments. With camera and tripod firmly in tow, Lewis tricks women into situations where he can murder them and record their fear on celluloid. His first victim is a woman of the night, the next a would be actress at the studio. Mark initially gets away with his crimes because he blends easily into the background. He's polite to a fault, quiet in manner and movement, and solitary. He spends most of his time in the huge dark room at his house, endlessly replaying his sordid film footage and anguishing over his painful childhood.
Enter Helen Stephens (Anna Massey), an aspiring author and tenant in Lewis's house. Young Stephens notices Mark when she sees him staring into her apartment during her birthday party. Intrigued, Helen follows Lewis up to his apartment, discovers he owns the house and acts as its landlord, and witnesses some of his bizarre behavior. Despite the uneasiness of their first meeting, Mark and Helen become fast friends. In fact, Lewis takes such a shine to Helen that the mere idea of "photographing" her--code for committing another murder--shocks him to the very marrow of his being. Helen really likes this man even though her blind, alcoholic mother despises young Lewis because she has an intuition that he is up to no good. Things begin to turn south for Mark when the police launch an investigation into the murders, Helen's mother confronts him about his activities, and he learns that his little problem will take years of therapy to overcome. Lewis loses his cool as the authorities close in but discovers a peace of sorts during the film's conclusion.
Modern audiences will scratch their heads as they try to figure out why "Peeping Tom" was so controversial when it first came out. I think the primary reason this movie shocked British moviegoers and critics concerns how the movie presents such an appalling criminal as a figure worthy of sympathy and outright pity. No one wants to feel for a murderer of young women, but Powell's movie often gives Boehm's character endearing traits. When Helen comes to Mark requesting his aid with the photographs in her soon to be published book, Lewis visibly enthuses that anyone would honor him with such a request. The guy is genuinely happy about Helen's success, and further confounds audience perceptions by buying her a very nice brooch for her birthday. He gives her this gift not as a means for tricking her into a situation where he can victimize her, but because he likes her, respects her, and wants her to be happy. There are a few other reasons why "Peeping Tom" scandalized the British film industry, probably reasons best left unelaborated on here, but the film's refusal to judge Mark Lewis's behavior is probably the biggest reason for the insults heaped on this picture.
I liked the film even though it is a relatively bloodless affair. Carl Boehm's performance as the tortured Mark Lewis provides the primary impetus for viewing this film. He captures perfectly the concept of a scared, tormented little boy wrapped in a man's body. Hats off to Criterion as well; they did a grand job with the widescreen picture transfer and the heap of extras included on the disc. There's a stills gallery, a trailer for the film, a lengthy documentary about screenwriter Leo Marks, and a commentary by one of those hoity-toity film historians. Don't go into this movie looking for a gory thriller. What you will find is a colorful, quiet movie about a very disturbed young man looking for a way out of his personal darkness.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars a film ahead of its time, May 9 2004
By 
Ted "Ted" (Pennsylvania, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
This review is for the Criterion Collection DVD edition of the film.
This movie directed by Michael Powell, (after severing ties with longtime business partner, Emeric Pressburger) was highly controversial and almost cost him his career. The film was taken from theaters after only a week and was rarely distributed.
In the film a young filmmaker interested in feelings of terror, films women while killing them with a blade attached to his camera's tripod. The film captures the sadistic nature of people and shows how things are for them. He meets a young woman who is a tennant in his home. (he lives on the 2nd floor [1st floor in England] and has 2 apartments on the 1st floor. [ground floor in England]) She later becomes interesting in him and his life.
The film has great acting and the fright of the victims is very convincing. The DVD has a theatcical trailer as a special feature along with a behind the scenes slideshow, a documentary about the film called "A very british psycho" which aired on TV in England, and an audio essay about the film by Laura Mulvey.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Michael Powell crosses over the line with "Peeping Tom", Dec 29 2003
By 
Lawrance M. Bernabo (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
"Peeping Tom" is a film whose place in cinematic history cannot help but outweigh the critical value of the film itself. When it was released in Great Britain in 1960 it was universally condemned by the critics and pulled from released the first week, effectively ending the career of director Michael Powell ("I Know Where I'm Going," "Black Narcissus," "The Red Shoes"). "Peeping Tom" is about a young man who not only murders women, but who films them as he kills them. What upset the critics was that Powell used the perspective of the camera to turn the viewing audience into voyeurs as well, and that he made the murderer into a sympathetic figure.
Reducing "Peeping Tom" to the level of a slasher film misses the point, because this is much more of a psychological portrait of a troubled young man. Mark Lewis (Carl Boehm) works as an assistant cameraman at a film studio and has trouble appreciating the difference between the real world and what he sees through the lens of a camera. Mark has another job, taking "views" of half naked women for the owner of the local news agent shope (Bartlett Mullins) to sell discretely to his customers. But Mark's voyeurism is ultimately not about sex, but rather about fear: provoking it and recording it. As Mark slowly opens up to Helen (Anna Massey), the girl who lives downstairs in his building who shows an interest in his work, we learn that his father was a psychologist who filmed his son in a series of disquieting experiments into the nature of fear. The boy is following in daddy's footsteps. Powell and screenwriter Leo Marks had wanted to do a film about the work of Sigmund Freud, but John Huston was working on "Freud" in Hollywood, so Marks suggest a story about a voyeuristic murderer as an alternative psychological thriller. Ultimately, the psychological dimensions of "Peeping Tom" outweigh the thriller elements and are what make this a noteworthy film.
"Peeping Tom" came out before "Psycho," and the comparisons are inevitable, although they seem as much the work of different times as of different directors. Part of it is that Powell is working in technicolor, with rich colors which work against the horror elements in the film. But we also have to take into account that Powell is not dealing with suspense as a key part of the equation and that there is nothing in "Peeping Tom" anywhere near the level of the shower scene in "Psycho." The key scene is the opening sequences, where we see Mark approach a prostitute on the street, his camera becomes the point of view for the audience, and we see the terror on this face of his first victim before she dies. Then, during the opening credits, we see Mark watching the film he has just shot. The film's opening sets up the rules for the game in this film and no doubt outraged the London film credits before the director's name appeared (shown over Mark's projector no less). Add to this the fact that Powell and his son played Mark's father and Mark as a child, and that probably outraged them more than the half naked women lounging around in display positions. Powell's leading man was the son of a noted Austrian conductor and Boehm's slight German accent probably afforded the critics the small confort that this twisted individual was not a proper English lad.
Since this is a Criterion Collection DVD the presentation of the film is done right, with a commentary track by film theorist Laura Mulvey who combines criticism of the film with the history of the film, cast, and crew. Serious film students will enjoy her insights and her comprehensive critique of the film as a true commentary on "Peeping Tom," and not the gay banter of actors and crew trying to come up with things to say that are so disappointing on so many commentary tracks. There is a theatrical trailer, whose tenor seems quite at odds with the film itself, a gallery of production stills, and a Channel 4 U.K. documentary "A Very British Psycho," which relates the controversy of the film and interviews screenwriter Leo Marks and the critics who bashed the film on its release in 1962. You cannot help but feel that while it was Michael Powell's directing career that was ended up this film, it was Marks who should have suffered more as the writer is at least as disturbing a personality as his fictional creation in the film.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a peek, Sept. 15 2003
By 
D. Hartley (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
Humorist Matt Groening once defined one of the characteristics of a "true" film buff as "...someone who has opinions about movies they have never seen." After reading about Michael Powell's "Peeping Tom" for years, but never seeing it on the bill at a revival house, nor on TV, cable or video, I was beginning to wonder if Martin Scorcese was halluncinating when he "saw" it! Well, Marty's sanity is no longer in question with the Criterion Collection's DVD release in hand. "Peeping Tom", which famously opened and closed the same week in Great Britain, proves to be quite a prescient work. Actor Karl Boehm brings a disquieting Peter Lorre vibe to his soft-spoken serial killer Mark, a focus puller by day and "documentary" maker (of sorts) by night. Mark's little "indie film" project concerns a subject he is quite intimate with-a string of unsolved murders, all involving sexually alluring young women. You can detect a bit of "Peeping Tom" influence in 1966's "Blow-Up", 1985's controversial "Henry:Portrait of A Serial Killer", and even as recently as the 2002 Bob Crane biopic "Auto Focus". Criterion does a good job with the transfer (I'm assuming..some of us are deliriously happy just to finally get to SEE, much less own, an existing print of this legendary film, period!), and also features an interesting 1997 BBC documentary about the movie. A must-see for film noir fans and cult movie conisseurs.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Pioneering psychological horror is still effective, April 17 2003
By 
BD Ashley "vidiot_y2k" (Otago, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peeping Tom (VHS Tape)
Written by Leo Parks, PEEPING TOM remains director Michael Powell's most famous (or infamous, for that matter) film, which was overshadowed at its time of release by Hitchcock's PSYCHO and reviled by critics for being too sensational.
German actor Carl Boehm plays Mark, the psychopathic "Peeping Tom" of the title. Mark is a video photography buff who films his victims in their death throes because he likes seeing the fear in their eyes (The sad result of a traumatic childhood experience in which his scientist father would drop a lizard on him and film his fear as part of his experiments. Nice guy. Director Powell plays his father in the flashback sequence). But then a funny thing happens to Mark: he falls in love with Helen (Moira Shearer)one of his models/intended victims; and tries to keep the object of his affection from making him film her, because Mark automatically equates film and photography with pain and death. (His camera tripod has an extendable blade which he plunges into the throats of his victims).
Boehm gives a performance which is simultaneously naive and frightening.
Years ahead of its time, PEEPING TOM remains one of the most chilling British films ever lensed. While rather tame by today's standards its cult status is assured and there's no denying the influence it had on later films like REPULSION, FADE TO BLACK and HENRY: PORTRAIT OF A SERIAL KILLER. This pioneering movie is still of interest to horror fans and movie buffs. Will make you think twice before having your next family photo taken.
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3.0 out of 5 stars It's good... overhyped, but good., March 10 2003
This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
Peeping Tom (Michael Powell, 1960)
A Very British Psycho, BBC4ï¿s amusing documentary about Peeping Tom and its writer, Leo Marks, says that Peeping Tom is the film that got Michael Powell barred from the British cinema, sent him into exile in Australia, and destroyed his career. Itï¿s not quite as bad as all that; Powell did return to make another British film (The Boy Who Turned Yellow), and his interesting 1937 docudrama The Edge of the World was updated and re-released in Britain in 1978. He also ended his life on British soil in 1990, dying of cancer. In the interim, though, he made some wonderful Australian films that were, in general, well-received (of these, American audiences are probably best familiar with The Age of Consent, starring James Mason and a young, tantalizing Helen Mirren).
It is impossible, writing in 2003, to go back to 1960 and understand the effect Peeping Tom had on the British film world. Released four months before the similarly-themed American film Psycho, Peeping Tom, already cut, was pulled from theaters less than a week after its release, and remained banned for another thirty years; ironically, the version released after the lifting of the ban (theatrical premiere 16 September 1994) was uncut. To stay banned for thirty years, especially in the wake of Psycho (now considered an American classic), there has to be something pretty distressing going on.
There are, in fact, two things going on that are the likely causes of the distress: Pamela Greenï¿s nude scene (according to Green in the aforementioned documentary, the first in British film history on the big screen), and the sympathetic portrayal of the main character. Either alone, and it might have slipped past the censors; the combination was enough to get it yanked.
Peeping Tom is the story of Mark Lewis (German Academy Award winner for Lifetime Achievement Karlheinz Bohm), a serial killer whose particular quirk is filming the deaths of his victims and rewatching them over and over in his home theater. He works for a film studio as an assistant cameraman, but is truly of the once-idle rich; his inheritance is mostly gone, and he makes much of his money renting out rooms in the erstwhile mansion of his parents. After a chance meeting, he begins a tentative relationship with one of his tenants, Helen Stephens (Anna Massey, recently seen in The Importance of Being Earnest and Possession). Lewis struggles to keep his relationship with Helen normal while still indulging the seamier side of his nature, with the expected consequences.
Lewis is a far more sympathetic character than ever was Norman Bates, and thus in many ways Peeping Tom is a superior film to Psycho in its depth of character. In every other way, however, Psychoï¿s British older brother falls short. The cinematography, the music, the building of suspense, all are realms where Hitchcock had worlds of experience, while Powell had relatively little; Powell was in his element with the drama, rather than the thriller. And presented as a drama. with Lewisï¿ inner struggle the center of the action, this might well have made a lot more 100-best lists than it did. It makes a few too many bows to the lurid side, however, and most of them seem somewhat gratuitous. he mystery angle, too, seems a bit overdone; itï¿s as if the writers decided that a mystery had to be worked into the plot, and ï¿how can we handle this so it seems as if James M. Cain wrote it?ï¿
Still, a must-see film for those interested in the history of the thriller. Criterionï¿s DVD leaves a little something to be desired in the sound transfer (especially at the beginning), but the picture quality is unmatched in a film with this many years on its back. And if you can transport yourself back to 1960, in those few months between the release of Peeping Tom and your first viewing of Psycho, you might even get the intended effect. ***
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5.0 out of 5 stars A VERY British psycho indeed�, Dec 15 2002
By 
Paul Fogarty "Hopeless film addict!" (LA, United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
I first saw this film back in the 80's on British television, and was completely unaware of its history and background. I found it a very striking film, which explores - using the device of a serial killer photographer - the voyeur that is, to some extent, in all of us.
The film is difficult to categorize; thriller, drama, psychological horror, romance... to some extent it's all of the above, but I guess I'd say it's closest to a psychological horror/thriller film. But be warned, you'll find no unstoppable cyborg killers, no chainsaw wielding crazies, no killer aliens bleeding acid, or teenagers being sliced 'n' diced ad nauseum; if that's what you want, there're endless films, both good and bad, that will do the job. No, "Peeping Tom" deals with the desperate, abject "horror," that is born of a tortured human soul.
The film certainly doesn't hang around, and gets right down to business from the opening scene, which has the main character, a film technician named Mark Lewis, played by Karlheinz (Carl) Bohm, stalking and killing his first victim, one of London's many "streetwalkers." This opening scene sets the tone for most of the rest of the film, a feeling of seedy desperation.
Mark keeps it together in his everyday life, but he is horribly psychologically damaged by the "research" his father, a famed doctor of psychology, carried out on him as a child, and desperately driven to act out his own twisted revenge on those around him. Mark's father was researching the effects of fear on the human psyche, and used his own son as a clinical guinea pig throughout his childhood; now the child is grown, and driven by his own internal demons to complete his fathers work.
But Mark wants to take his fathers work one step forward, not only is he obsessed with 'fear', but he is consumed with the idea of "seeing" it, of "capturing" the face of fear with his camera, as if somehow that will bring him the ultimate understanding. And so it is that he sets out to murder Women, and films their last moments as he does so, creating his own "snuff movies," that he watches over and over again in his darkened apartment, desperately looking for something that only he can see.
And while he's not working in a film studio, Mark earns a little extra on the side by shooting porno pics in a room over a newsagents! This actually leads to what is probably the only deliberately comical scene in the whole film, when Mark reports for 'work' one evening, only to find an elderly gentleman in the shop perusing the special "views" that are for sale, "under the counter." There is a second scene in the film that raises a wry grin; Mark is in the street filming the police investigating his murder of the prostitute. A man walks up to him, and assuming he's a reporter, asks him what paper he works for, "Oh, The Observer," Mark replies with a knowing smile.
But Mark's life is not all horror and desperation; into it comes love and happiness in the shape of a girl, Helen Stevens, played by Anna Massey, who lives downstairs in his building. Helen is an ingenue, an innocent, in every sense of the word. She lives with her blind mother, and is as far removed from Mark's worlds, both his professional one at the studio and the porn operation "after hours," and his internal nightmare existence, as it is possible to be.
He opens up to her, and in a moment of trust, of empathy, shares with her a glimpse of his tortured childhood, by showing her some the film his father took of HIM, while he carried out his research! How can Mark reconcile these two worlds? Will he choose to live in the light with Helen, or will he be cast into horrifying darkness and damnation by his internal demons, driven to take ever greater risks in his quest to "see" what he so desperately needs to see; will Helen herself, or her mother, be sacrificed to this end?!
Karlheinz Bohm's performance as Mark is wonderful; he's a monster, he was MADE a monster by his own father, he knows it, but he's a monster all the same, only, he doesn't WANT to be a monster! And herein lies the "problem" with "Peeping Tom;" Mark is an incredibly sympathetic character! We the audience are aware of all this, and yet we want Mark to change, to be happy with Helen, to help her with the children's book she's writing, but he's a killer of Women, and worse, he's driven to kill time and time again. There's a scene where he 'toys' with one of his victims on a studio soundstage that reminded me of the way a cat will 'play' with a bird or mouse before moving in for the kill. An incredible, cold-blooded performance by Bohm.
It's difficult, if not impossible, to view the film NOW, with the sensibilities of those who watched when it came out in the early 60's. The film opened to a roaring, and unanimous, tide of disgust and revulsion on the part of the London critics, and was pulled from the cinema circuit within a week of its release. One of the worst reviews went as follows; "The only really satisfactory way to dispose of "Peeping Tom" would be to shovel up and flush it swiftly down the nearest sewer. Even then the stench would remain!"
The film was "lost" for nearly 20 years, before being rediscovered by the likes of Martin Scorsese. This is still a somewhat uncomfortable film to watch, and the last 10 minutes or so, when Mark realizes the game is up, have lost none of their power to chill.
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5.0 out of 5 stars BRILLIANT CINEMATIC JOURNEY...., Oct. 12 2002
By 
Mark Norvell (HOUSTON) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
Michael Powell's ("THE RED SHOES") career was practically destroyed when this film bowed in 1960. Critics savaged both him and the film. They weren't ready for his view of voyuerism and the cinema. The film itself is a fine and daring piece of work detailing the obsession and madness of a young photographer who was horrendously traumatized as a child by his equally obsessed father. Mark (Karl Boehm) murders women with the tripod of his camera as he films their faces as they are dying. He then views the footage in private for self gratification. He's literally making his own "pornography". Whew. Not an easy subject matter for 1960! But what the film says to me is that we are ALL voyeurs because we watch cinema for different reasons. Some are sicker than others. This movie is a heavy statement by a renowned filmmaker who literally put his career on the line to make it. He lost. But today, the film survives as a testament to Powell's viewpoint and ideas. And we are the richer for it. "Peeping Tom" is still not for every taste primarily because I don't feel very many people can understand what is being said by the movie. For those who do get it , it is a rare treat indeed. A MUST for cinephiles.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic and original psychological "slasher" film, Oct. 12 2002
By 
Troy M. Ros "rastacat1" (Northfield, MN) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
"Well, he won't be doing the crossword tonight!"
"Do you know what the most frightening thing in the world is ...?"
This is somewhat of a landmark film in that it was well made and truly disturbing. Those two things had not really made it to films together before this gem came along. But unfortunately for the director Michael Powell, it also brought about the end of his career as a director. Make a scary movie that is effective and realistic? The nerve! Lets blacklist him and make sure he never does it again!
It did however pave the way for fellow director Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho which came out a few months later. Without Peeping Tom to have blazed the trail the same fate to some degree may have befallen Hitchcock.
The story is about a reclusive man, Mark Lewis (Karlheinz Böhm), who works as a cameraman for a movie studio during the day, and by night films things with his hand held movie camera. What his tastes for filming have turned to lately have been the looks on women's faces as they are being murdered.
A woman in the building he lives in, Vivian (Moira Shearer), takes a fancy to him and starts getting him to go out occasionaly. They hit it off but Vivians mother, a blind woman who is so good at using her other senses that she can tell who is standing outside their window, has her doubts about Vivians new love interest. In one incredible scene there is a confrontation between her and Mark that is terrifying to watch.
It almost has the feel of a who-dunnit except that we know exactly who-dunnit from the start. The detectives in the movie are putting together the clues that take them closer to Mark and and the tension that is built around them and between Mark and Vivian and her mother becomes intense as the movie progresses.
The ending, although less shocking 40 years after the movie was released, still left me somewhat drained and empty. A certain amount of sympathy is built up for Mark and there are hopes that he can be redeemed. But I won't tell any more of what happens, you will just have to rent or buy the movie.
This is part of the Criterion Collection and horror/drama fans and dvd enthusiasts alike will not be dissapointed. Besides the excellent subject matter there is a full commentary by film theorist Laura Mulvey and a doumentary entitled "A Very British Psycho". There is also a still gallery including behind the scenes shots and a theatrical trailer.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very British/Austrian Psychotic Beauty, July 17 2002
This review is from: Peeping Tom (Widescreen) (DVD)
More radical than even Psycho, "Peeping Tom" will knock your socks off. The entire movie sort of stalks along, gently pulling you to watch. Nothing will disturb you more than the amount at which you will love Karl Boehm and his sweet yet deathly voice. His austrian "S"s come across in the creepiest way. Quietly, he whispers to Anna Massey's character, "Happy Birsday," after brutally killing, and of course filming, a prostitute. I just can't get enough of the thrills this film gives me. Forget Psycho (which came out a few months after this one) and buy a film that "ruined" Powell's carreer.
Perhaps even MORE engaging, if at all possible, is the documentary featured on the Criterion DVD, "A Very British Psycho." You will never regret getting to know the writer of the film, Leo Marks. Marks was a codes expert during WWII and is the most fascinating man I've ever heard talk. He even made me like poetry (not an easy task, trust me.)
Buy this DVD immediately and spread the word. People deserve good things and Powell's movie deserves as much recognition as possible.
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Peeping Tom (Widescreen)
Peeping Tom (Widescreen) by Michael Powell (DVD - 2002)
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