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5.0 out of 5 stars OVERALL SCORE: (A), March 16 2004
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a great read, it is a beautiful epic whose true force lies in the poignant details of its characters, richly detailed, woven into a wonderful tapestry.
The main character is refressing and real, very understandable and interesting.
This is one of the best books done by the Forgotten Realms/Wizards of the Coast, the story is lively and entertaining, the characters are colorful and interesting, and the plot is energetic and spellbinding!
OVERALL SCORE: (A)
READABILITY: (A), PLOT: (A), CHARATERS: (A), DIALOGUE: (B-), SETTING: (B+), ACTION/COMBAT: (B+), MONSTERS/ANTAGONISTS: (B+), ROMANCE: (B+), SEX: (n/a), AGE LEVEL: (PG13)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the usual Forgotten Realms stories of late!, March 14 2004
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
The story is lively and entertaining, the characters are colorful and interesting, and the plot is energetic and spellbinding!

OVERALL SCORE: (A)
READABILITY: (A-), PLOT: (B+), CHARATERS: (A), DIALOGUE: (B), SETTING: (B+), ACTION/COMBAT: (B+), MONSTERS/ANTAGONISTS: (B+), ROMANCE: (B+), SEX: (None), AGE LEVEL: (PG13)
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Butler and the Assassin, Jan. 11 2004
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This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
The book Twilight Falling was a spectacular triumph for Paul S. Kemp. The reason it was so stimulating was because of the normal single track story line this had a branch story line. There is no true plot becuase there are two plots one is the one we all know with the shadow maginc and the globe the other is about Erevis and his inner struggle. It is not a classic good and bad struggle it is more bad and bad with good intentions. Not since Steel Brightblade from Dragonlance have I heard a better contrast in a person. It is a constant battle in Cale's head and to find out if the butler or the assassin will win you will have to read the next extravagent novel by Paul S. Kemp.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Twilights Rising, Nov. 3 2003
By 
Chris (Palmerston North New Zealand) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
Twilight falling is definitely a success and a great read. Erivis Cale is the perfect subject for a story exploring the darker sides of human nature, just the right mix of light and dark, A reluctant hero. But a hero cant stand alone, and it just isn't Cale's style to ask for help, or have the innocent adventurers tagging along. Riven the assassin and one time nemesis to Cale teams up with cale along with the gutsy halfling Jak to bring down some of the best Villians Forgotten Realms have had in years. Even this mix doesn't meen a great book. It's the story line that brings them all together. Power, Greed, Hate and Sacrifice all make this the book it is. I don't plan on ruining the book for you but the ending and new twist in the story leave me in heavy anticipation of the next book Dawn of Night. (Whens that coming out by the way)
My advice, go out and get this book, well worth the penny's spent on it. Happy hunting
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5.0 out of 5 stars Erevis Cale is Great., Oct. 31 2003
By 
Amazon Customer (My Computer, Michigan) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
To tell you the truth, the cover of this book attracted me more than anything else. When I actually picked it up and started actually reading, I was standing in Border's for an hour straight. I was immediately taken by the dark world of the butler/assassin Erevis Cale. Not only him, but his enemies and allies proved to be equally as intriguing. Kemp does a brilliant job in bringing out all the characteristics of each character from Riven's constant sneer to the perfect presentation of the half-drow Azriim. I loved all the characters and the storywas one of the most engaging I've reading in a long time.
I am a Salvatore fan. I think the word villian ends and begins with Artemis Entreri. This adventure into the world of Cale has changed my view completely. There are no real "good" guys here, so paladin lovers should look elsewhere. The art in this book is definitely the evil. Everything in it gave me a mental picture as though Brom had painted it himself. Doom and gloom in a fashion even good guys can like. Brlliant.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A big thumbs up!, Oct. 9 2003
By 
Guestalt (Canton, Michigan United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
TWILIGHT FALLING is an exciting, fast paced book that keeps you involved throughout. After I became disenchanted with D&D product related books, a friend suggested I look into the books containing Erevis Cale by Paul Kemp. I found the story line refreshing and the characterization superb. I have been following the author's work, and the main character's story line, avidly since. This book in particular is a delight to read. I got to the end of the story and was surprised at how quickly I had finished it. The ensemble of characters is outstanding. Each character has its lifelike nuances without falling into the cliché. I found myself wanting to know more about each character, even the villains. The hero of the story, Erevis Cale, is interesting to read about because he has faults, but is working to better himself. This book is an excellent addition to the Erevis Cale saga as a hole, and a great continuation from SHADOW'S WITNESS. I'll not tick through the story line, after all that is why you read the book. I'll just say I highly recommend this be one of the books you spend your free time reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best of the Realms!, Oct. 4 2003
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
As a LOOOONG time D&D gamer and fantasy lover I thoroughly enjoy the Realms books. This is one of the best. Kemp goes beyond the one dimensional slash/cast spell/get treasure characters seen in many of these books. His characters think and grow before our eyes. Riven is one of the most interesting and well developed characters to come along in a dragon's age. I look forward to seeing more of him in the future. Maybe in his own series (hint, hint!)
I have only one quarrel with this book, and it really is with the entire Forgotten Realms series. New series are constantly branching off willy-nilly like this one and references are made to former books. Yes, the books are "stand alone" but it is distracting and a bit discouraging to keep reading about what happened to the characters in other books. A list or chart somewhere might be a good idea for those who want to know where to start reading the books they have missed and how they relate to this one.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Kemps Second Success, Aug. 30 2003
By 
Lee Spann (South Perth, WA Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
"Shadows Witness" (The first full book featuring Erevis Cale) was surprisingly good. Surprising, because Forgotten Realms novels have been with few exceptions pretty weak in my opinion.
Kemp provides another excellent novel about Erevis and does so by providing extremely interesting characters. Both Cale and the fantastic secondary character Riven are extremely well written and make you want to invest your time in reading about their adventure together.
That's what good writing is all about. You can experience it with this novel.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Realms novel, Aug. 11 2003
By 
Alan DeHaan (Noblesville, Indiana USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
Alright, this is the first time I was planning on writing a review for a book, the other times I decided to do it because I was so over (or under) whelmed. It definitely changes the thought process while reading.
Twilight Falling (good title) is the first book in the Erevis Cale trilogy, the fourth book Erevis Cale is a main character in, and the sixth story of his. The fifth one written by Paul Kemp.
There is so much I want to talk about, especially the last 30 or so pages. But, for obvious reasons I'm not going to go THAT far. Any further than the first couple of chapters will be entirely vague, and any talk of what is beyond the middle of the book will have the vagueness be replaced with invisibility.
Unlike many fantasy characters, Erevis does a lot of sitting around and thinking. While this can sometimes be a little distracting (especially when the events he is reflecting over cause him to fall into a more angsty mood) it does let the reader get into the head of the character and that is always a good.
Now don't get me wrong, there is a ton of action in this first book. But it never feels tacked on, it all feels important to the story. Paul deserves great kudos just for that, so if I ever see him at a convention I'm definitely going to give him a box or two filled with that candy bar.
He is one of those writers who fit in naturally with the realms. He seems to know what's going on, he can drop small references to distant lands as quickly and easily as a gamer drops money at a convention. He creates little bits of culture that enhance the realms, and makes the reader feel more immersed into the book.
An author who can write believable action sequences, make it so a reader can get into the head of the main character, and make the reader feel immersed in the setting of the novel is a godsend. I don't know how much of this is his ability to pick up things that are previously published, and how much is just his mind at work. But I do know I will once again echo my earlier call and say I cannot wait to see what he does in a world of his own making.
The storyline is as follows: Shortly before his death, Thamalon Uskevren bought a curious little sphere imbedded with many gems. A shadow adept of Cyric knows that sphere for what it is, and is searching for it. Traveling with the adept is a Half Drow, an Easterner, and a Cormyrian.
Erevis Cale (Former letters man for the Night Masks, former Lieutenant for the Righteous Man of the Night Knives, former Butler for the Uskevren Family and current Priest of Mask) is caught up in these events, along with Drasek Riven (Former Zhent Assassin, now in the service of Mask) and Jak Fleet (Former Harper, still a priest of Brandobaris).
Lord of Stormweather (Last book of Sembia Series, written by Dave Gross) ended with Erevis Cale leaving the Uskevren employ, though it happening offscreen. Twilight Falling begins before that, and the leavetaking is written out here and written well. It didn't feel forced, how it flowed felt natural due to the ending of LoS, and how Erevis has been changing since the Sembia Series began. And his frame of mind easily launched him into this, the next chapter of his life.
The Characterization of the three guys on the side of good (I had to phrase it that way, Drasek can't be called good, and sometimes Erevis doesn't feel that way) is still on target with how they were initially presented, but also shows more depth and more evolution of character. Erevis especially has undergone much, and his thinking, words, and actions all show that. The characterizations of Vraggen and Azriim, the shadow adept and half-drow respectively, are very well done, and Azriim's humour occasionally made me chuckle.
The bits (before the end) that really stand out is some of the choices that Paul Kemp made. The Twisted Elm scene had Jak Fleet as the primary character, and let us get into his head. This was brilliant because almost everything that we would have read from Erevis' line of thinking would have just been rehashes of what he's thought in the chapters previous to the scene. By having Jak be the main character, it made the entire chapter new, instead of just the events of the chapter. I also loved how he chose to present Sephris, the insane priest of Oghma. It had me scratching my head and then, a few chapters later, going 'Oh yeah, now that makes sense.' It is also about time that a Realms author included a character like Magadon. I'd say more, but that's near the end of the book. Let's just say, a character like that is a long time in coming.
The end had me waiting painfully in anticipation for the next novel. Though, as a nice twist, this story can almost completely stand alone by itself. Just the last 7 pages or so (And some of the foreshadowing earlier in the book) point that this is only Part one. Well those and the fact it says Part 1 on the cover.
I highly recommend this to all Realms readers. It is a very delightful and satisfying read. Definitely the best Realms novel I ever read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Realms novel, Aug. 11 2003
By 
Alan DeHaan (Noblesville, Indiana USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I (Mass Market Paperback)
Alright, this is the first time I was planning on writing a review for a book, the other times I decided to do it because I was so over (or under) whelmed. It definitely changes the thought process while reading.
Twilight Falling (good title) is the first book in the Erevis Cale trilogy, the fourth book Erevis Cale is a main character in, and the sixth story of his. The fifth one written
by Paul Kemp.
There is so much I want to talk about, especially the last 30 or so pages. But, for obvious reasons I'm not going to go THAT far. Any further than the first couple of
chapters will be entirely vague, and any talk of what is beyond the middle of the book will have the vagueness be replaced with invisibility.
Unlike many fantasy characters, Erevis does a lot of sitting around and thinking. While this can sometimes be a little distracting (especially when the events he is
reflecting over cause him to fall into a more angsty mood) it does let the reader get into the head of the character and that is always a good.
Now don't get me wrong, there is a ton of action in this first book. But it never feels tacked on, it all feels important to the story. Paul deserves great kudos just for that,
so if I ever see him at a convention I'm definitely going to give him a box or two filled with that candy bar.
He is one of those writers who fit in naturally with the realms. He seems to know what's going on, he can drop small references to distant lands as quickly and easily as
a gamer drops money at a convention. He creates little bits of culture that enhance the realms, and makes the reader feel more immersed into the book.
An author who can write believable action sequences, make it so a reader can get into the head of the main character, and make the reader feel immersed in the setting
of the novel is a godsend. I don't know how much of this is his ability to pick up things that are previously published, and how much is just his mind at work. But I do
know I will once again echo my earlier call and say I cannot wait to see what he does in a world of his own making.
The storyline is as follows: Shortly before his death, Thamalon Uskevren bought a curious little sphere imbedded with many gems. A shadow adept of Cyric knows that
sphere for what it is, and is searching for it. Traveling with the adept is a Half Drow, an Easterner, and a Cormyrian.
Erevis Cale (Former letters man for the Night Masks, former Lieutenant for the Righteous Man of the Night Knives, former Butler for the Uskevren Family and current
Priest of Mask) is caught up in these events, along with Drasek Riven (Former Zhent Assassin, now in the service of Mask) and Jak Fleet (Former Harper, still a priest of Brandobaris).
Lord of Stormweather (Last book of Sembia Series, written by Dave Gross) ended with Erevis Cale leaving the Uskevren employ, though it happening offscreen.
Twilight Falling begins before that, and the leavetaking is written out here and written well. It didn't feel forced, how it flowed felt natural due to the ending of LoS, and
how Erevis has been changing since the Sembia Series began. And his frame of mind easily launched him into this, the next chapter of his life.
The Characterization of the three guys on the side of good (I had to phrase it that way, Drasek can't be called good, and sometimes Erevis doesn't feel that way) is still on
target with how they were initially presented, but also shows more depth and more evolution of character. Erevis especially has undergone much, and his thinking, words,
and actions all show that. The characterizations of Vraggen and Azriim, the shadow adept and half-drow respectively, are very well done, and Azriim's humour
occasionally made me chuckle.
The bits (before the end) that really stand out is some of the choices that Paul Kemp made. The Twisted Elm scene had Jak Fleet as the primary character, and let us
get into his head. This was brilliant because almost everything that we would have read from Erevis' line of thinking would have just been rehashes of what he's thought
in the chapters previous to the scene. By having Jak be the main character, it made the entire chapter new, instead of just the events of the chapter. I also loved how he
chose to present Sephris, the insane priest of Oghma. It had me scratching my head and then, a few chapters later, going 'Oh yeah, now that makes sense.' It is also
about time that a Realms author included a character like Magadon. I'd say more, but that's near the end of the book. Let's just say, a character like that is a long time in
coming.
The end had me waiting painfully in anticipation for the next novel. Though, as a nice twist, this story can almost completely stand alone by itself. Just the last 7 pages or so (And some of the foreshadowing earlier in the book) point that this is only Part one. Well those and the fact it says Part 1 on the cover
I highly recommend this to all Realms readers. It is a very delightful and satisfying read. Definitely the best Realms novel I ever read.
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Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I
Twilight Falling: The Erevis Cale Trilogy, Book I by Paul S. Kemp (Mass Market Paperback - Aug. 1 2003)
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