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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Introduction to Web Usability
If there's a book to use when introducing someone to the ideas of usability on the Web, I'd have to say that I think this is it. Not Nielsen, and not Cooper (at least not to start with). Steve Krug's "Don't Make Me Think" has the most no-nonsense and easy-to-follow approach I think I've ever seen, and best of all, he makes SENSE.

First of all, Krug...
Published on June 23 2004 by Rich Stoehr

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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth Reading But Has Serious Flaws
Mr. Krug thoughtfully points out usability issues that every web developer should be aware of, and his points are well-considered ones. But there are some serious flaws. To begin with is his definition of "usability" -- usability for whom? Mr. Krug completely ignores web accessibility issues for persons with disabilities. The web-viewing public he is concerned with have...
Published on Oct. 31 2002 by Robert Roberts


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Worth Reading But Has Serious Flaws, Oct. 31 2002
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
Mr. Krug thoughtfully points out usability issues that every web developer should be aware of, and his points are well-considered ones. But there are some serious flaws. To begin with is his definition of "usability" -- usability for whom? Mr. Krug completely ignores web accessibility issues for persons with disabilities. The web-viewing public he is concerned with have no disabilities that make reading pages difficult or impossible, do not use assistive technologies, or do not use old browsers. The author fails to mention that approximately 20% of web surfers have some form of disability, and fails to suggest online or book resources for learning more about this issue. Designing for ALL surfers is not, as he would put it, 'rocket surgery'. Is he really unaware of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines as put forth by the W3C or of section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act? His sections about navigation are absurdly one-sided. Does he truly think that javascripted navigation, or navigation with tabs are universally usable?
Secondly, the author is still stuck in largely tables-based HTML presentation methods. Usability means building a site that works on hand-held and telephonic devices as well as assistive interenet devices. This can be accomplished through XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets. In fact, separating markup from presentation is a large part of what Mr. Krug should be discussing, but doesn't.
Thirdly, Mr. Krug's examples are of large, well-branded sites. That's fine, but his comments and suggestions seem best-suited to those sites, not small business or other small-site needs. This shows in his lack of information about designing pages that will expedite search engine effectiveness. In fact, he outright dismisses the usefulness of the introductory paragraph often found on homepages as "happy talk", stating that "happy talk must die" (p. 46). Many search engines print this paragraph, or a portion of it, as part of the information you see when you're searching for a topic. Why not tell developers how to utilize this paragraph to advantage? Is it because his examples are large sites with well-known branding that don't require additional information? The wording of that paragraph can make or break a search engine user's decision about visiting a site.
Even though it is painfully lacking in some very vital information, Mr. Krug's book is worth reading. However, a savvy developer will not take everything he says as gospel, but will continue to learn more about what usability *really* is, what new developments are coming 'round the bend, and will seek out more fully-rounded information before committing development hours and money just to end up with a half-usable site.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Introduction to Web Usability, June 23 2004
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
If there's a book to use when introducing someone to the ideas of usability on the Web, I'd have to say that I think this is it. Not Nielsen, and not Cooper (at least not to start with). Steve Krug's "Don't Make Me Think" has the most no-nonsense and easy-to-follow approach I think I've ever seen, and best of all, he makes SENSE.

First of all, Krug deconstructs some of the sites we all know and use often, and he does so to help us see what we should be doing, as well as what we should not. I remember being especially impressed with his in-depth analysis of Amazon.com's navigation scheme (Chapter 6 - "Street Signs and Breadcrumbs"), from the use of tabs to the structure of the sub-navigation to color changes, he covers it all with a sense of humor, clear pictorial examples, a sharp eye for detail, and a clear concise explanation of what works and why. The reader is left with a greater understanding of not only why Amazon has been so successful, but also what choices they made that helped them find this solution.

The chapter on usability testing (Chapter 9 - "Usability Testing on 10 cents a day") was another fine example of clear communication and great ideas. Krug's breakdown of how the usability process should be conducted, and why it's needed in the first place, is concise and not preachy, as some usability authors are, and it really gives the reader an excellent idea of how they can fit usability into their process. This is probably the best way to "sell" usability to someone, and he does a great job of it.

The whole book is like that, really, but those chapters were highlights in the book for me. His ideas on simplicity of presentation and home page design were also well-taken, both as a designer and as someone who uses the web. Perhaps that is what makes his book so excellent, is that really, anyone could get something out of it. Whether it's the person who surfs the web now and again or the one who designs the pages for it or the one who's paying for the person to design pages for it, anyone could read this book and benefit from it, without having to wade through piles of needless verbage or proselytizing.

In the end, "Don't Make Me Think" seems to be an example of what it advises... it keeps things simple and accessible for a wide variety of people, and thereby makes itself useful as an excellent resource. The next time someone asks me what Web usability is all about, this is the first book I'll be recommending to them.
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5.0 out of 5 stars eye openning, Jan. 13 2013
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This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
This was the first book I read about ux and it made me become a UX designer! It's that good
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Required Reading, July 5 2004
By 
Rachael Hoffman "Rae" (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
This book should be required reading for not only web designers, but anyone who owns a website. The book was a bit on the thin side and when I got it I thought it should have been thicker for the money. I was wrong.
This book takes you through every facet of usability and is as applicable to a single person with one site as it is to a multi-level corporation who owns 30 sites. His writing style is fun and humorous and the book is an easy read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Only for Beginners - Light on Substance, Dec 29 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
I've been a usability engineer/information architect for 8 years and have read many books on both GUI and web design. I'm sorry to report that this book was disappointing. It took me only a few hours to breeze through and I came away with very little that was new to me and with the perception that this book was light on substance. Perhaps this is because I have been in this field for so long. However, I just finished reading Jeff Johnson's "GUI Bloopers" and, even after designing GUIs for so many years, I learned so much from Jeff's book. If you are new to this field, Krug's book will help but make sure to read "Designing Web Usability" by Nielsen, "Information Architecture for the World Wide Web" by Rosenfeld and Morville, "Designing Large Scale Web Sites" by Sano, and "Web Navigation" by Jennifer Fleming. I also recommend Johnson's book on GUI design. So many GUI Design Principles are directly applicable to good web site design.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST-HAVE for any online business!!!, June 13 2004
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This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
This book is one of the most magnificently written books I've ever read. It's written in such an easy to understand way, and in simple terms so that EVERYONE can understand it! There are tons of helpful tips in how to design the best website ever. As part of a Women's World-wide organization, as well as an Entrepreneur, this book helped me to take another 'look' at my website and do some serious make-overs! I will continue to use this book on a weekly basis to keep referencing back to it for some website pointers for my site @
[...]
If you don't own this book - buy it now. It will definitely become one of the most valuable items in your home office!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply a Riot!, Feb. 22 2004
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
Where to begin?
Mr. Krug has a writing style that matches my own: logical, easy to follow, and full of humor. Once I started reading, I simply couldn't put the book down.
This book gives a copious amount of information about the right ways and wrong ways to design a web site. Mr. Krug easily pairs this information with live examples of sites that are online, or intranet sites in which he played a part. Interjected in this valuable information are some of the funniest barbs, observations, and comments I've heard in quite some time.
Most of the concepts in this book are straight common sense. So common, in fact, that we tend to overlook them, and consequently violate the rules. Don't worry, Mr. Krug gently points them out to you with vivid pictures and diagrams, and has you laughing while he does it. He even has a name for his business that ties in to this common sense mentality. Read the book - you'll understand...and smile.
Want to know what billboards and roadsigns in Los Angeles and Boston have to do with web design? Read the book. You'll soon discover yourself critiqing road signs and such in the area of town you live. Department stores will become a library of examples on how to organize and display information. And you'll always, ALWAYS find yourself analyzing web sites that you already frequent, and pointing out what works and what could be improved upon.
One question: are you a scanner or reader? You'll find out once you read this book. And then you'll be amazed at the accuracy of what Mr. Krug has said and what you actually do when you're on the web.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book for information design, Nov. 12 2003
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This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
I sincerely enjoyed reading this book on my train rides to work. Falling asleep while reading it was not really related to the book itself ;-)
Despite the many useful tips in the book (sometimes very obvious, but you need to hear them from someone to believe it), I think the design of the book (color print on almost every page) probably makes it too expensive and the actual content could probably have been compressed into 15 pages or so as well.
Anyways, a good read for most so-called "web-designers".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oooh lala!! BUY THIS BOOK., March 19 2003
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
Basically, I am dying for a sequal. This was the best book for usability I have read so far. Most of the books put me to sleep within the first chapter. For those of us designers who have ADD, this is a great book. It reads fast, and it is educational. Whoever said it was obvious...just ignore that review. I give it to all of my clients that want to force me into doing something I don't agree with with POOR web usability. I LOVE YOU STEVEN KRUG! PLEASE WRITE ANOTHER BOOK TO ENLIGHTEN US ALL!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Overview of Web Usability in a Breezy Style, March 9 2003
By 
"dathon" (New York City) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (Paperback)
This is a fun book. It can easily be read in one setting, but it will impart many good nuggets of web usability knowledge. Krug is not as extreme as Jakob Nielsen with sparseness, but rather tackles what makes the web a unique medium. His basic thesis is that people scan webpages for information, they don't read them, and therefore designers have to keep that paramount in mind. As one of his chapters is titled "Omit Needless Words," except the word "needless" is struck through. Hear! Hear! Let's give it up for pithiness.
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Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability
Don't Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability by Steve Krug (Paperback - Oct. 13 2000)
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