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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I never decided to leave while reading this play
Apparently, people have made much of the "fact" that Godot is god. While hardly being a fact (and in fact, being outwardly denied by Beckett himself), people who search too desperately for the specific personage Godot represents miss the point. One can say that Godot is god, especially if one is a New Critic and therefore ignores whatever the author may have...
Published on April 13 2004 by mikethecommie

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3.0 out of 5 stars Shmeh
I did a lot of waiting for Godot myself, and was unimpressed. A little too abstract for my personal taste, but it's a classic apparently.
Published 3 months ago by Ron


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I never decided to leave while reading this play, April 13 2004
This review is from: Waiting for Godot - English: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts (Paperback)
Apparently, people have made much of the "fact" that Godot is god. While hardly being a fact (and in fact, being outwardly denied by Beckett himself), people who search too desperately for the specific personage Godot represents miss the point. One can say that Godot is god, especially if one is a New Critic and therefore ignores whatever the author may have said about his work. And while at one point Vladimir exclaims (and I'm just paraphrasing): "Godot is here! We are saved," this does not explicitly explain who Godot is. He could just as easily be bringing money to Vladimir and Estragon as he could be bearing salvation for them. The point is, that Beckett was an essentially existential writer, and saw that all of life was just waiting for the terminal breath. Furthermore, in the act of waiting for an ending, Vladimir and Estragon constantly make the existential choice: whether or not to keep on waiting. Several times they contemplate committing suicide; several times Estragon threatens to leave. In the end, they confirm their existence (yes, only one existence--they seem to be as one person in the dialogue: this is no mistake) by deciding, if offhandishly, to remain living; living, and waiting.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Not proofread at ALL, April 30 2014
By 
J. Swiatczak (Toronto, ON, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Only buy this book if you are totally immune to typos and misspellings. Things like the letter "I" being substituted with a lowercase "L", or the word "we'll" spelled "well". I, unfortunately, am not.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Shmeh, April 4 2014
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I did a lot of waiting for Godot myself, and was unimpressed. A little too abstract for my personal taste, but it's a classic apparently.
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4.0 out of 5 stars I really love this book but it wouldn't be for everyone, Aug. 18 2013
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This book is a classic in existential play. If you don't know anything about this play I would highly suggest doing a bit of research before buying it as it is unlike most plays/ literature.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Waiting for Godot??? Still Waiting, Aug. 12 2013
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I was very disappointed in this purchase. It was a very slim volume for the price. The font was too small making the text almost illegible. I had purchased it as a special gift for my husband's 60th birthday as he loved the play. The bottom line is that he has not opened it since I gave it to him. I won't be buying this type of purchase from Amazon again as you can't really tell the quality of a book on line and there didn't seem to be an avenue of returning it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Endless futility for the Irish, Feb. 12 2013
By 
David Wineberg "David Wineberg" (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Waiting For Godot (Paperback)
The amazing thing about Waiting for Godot is that it has always engendered confusion, uncertainty and half-formed theories. It's puzzling to most viewers and reviewers. So much so, you have to wonder why anyone likes it, since they don't seem to be able to understand it. Yet far from an enigmatic muddle, Godot is crystal clear. It is an Irish vision of Purgatory/Limbo.

All the evidence points to it; no evidence contradicts it. It lets the whole story come together consistently and rationally. Two ragged fellows meet every morning and do nothing all day. Not that there is anything to do - the world is essentially flat, boundless, gray and barren, save for one derisory dead tree. There is no water, no food (save for a single old vegetable in the pocket of one of them - every day), no shelter, no objects of any kind. Not even a place to sit. Estragon is doomed to remember nothing except being beaten up the night before. Every night. Vladimir is cursed with an inkling of having been here and done this before, but can't quite nail it. Total frustration.

They consider suicide, but don't even have the means to do even that little. They are dead men already, so it is redundant. They cross paths with another pair, similarly cursed, and this happens every day with no one remembering the previous encounter. They are doomed to repeat this meaningless activity every day for eternity. And part of it is waiting for a man who they've never met and who never comes. He cancels on them every afternoon.

What fresh hell is this? to borrow from Ms. Parker. They are waiting for God(ot) to decide their eternal fates. And every day, God doesn't show. It's Limbo (since cancelled).

It is precisely the same Limbo envisioned by another great Irish author and playwright, Flann O'Brien, in his last novel - The Third Policeman. In it, the nameless "hero" awakens in a land much like the one he came from, but can't interact with. Instead, his wanderings continually take him to the police station, where the two constables tell him he'll have to wait for the third policeman, who never shows. The police talk endlessly about a bicycle parked there, and whether or not it has moved, is capable of moving, should move, has the will to move, didn't it just move? After 150 pages of this, our hero surmises this can't go on and must be a bad dream, because it's not as if he is dead, he says. And it hits you; yes, of course that's it - he is dead. This is Purgatory. Doomed to endlessly repeat the same boring, pointless rounds all day every day, visiting a deep well of lockers where he can withdraw anything he wants or needs, but he cannot take any of it back up the elevator if it adds even a fraction of an ounce to the personal weight he came down with.

Nonsense. Frustration. Boredom. Futility. Pointlessness. Endlessness. Hopelessness. Agony. There is no climax, no love, no betrayal - the minimum requirements of drama. There's just the same again. That is Beckett and O'Brien's vision of what awaits Irishmen. In other words, more of the same. Forever. That is as powerful as anything truly dramatic, and accounts for Godot's undiminished popularity.

Waiting for Godot is, in more ways than one, timeless.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant piece of Existentialist and Absurdist literature, July 28 2003
This review is from: Waiting for Godot - English: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts (Paperback)
Waiting for Godot centers around two bums: Estragon and Vladimir. Estragon has an incredibly short memory and relies on Vladimir to remember for him. As a result, Estragon is extremely impatient and constantly suggests that the two would be better off if they parted. However, Estragon needs Vladimir and Vladimir needs Estragon, so they never do part. Vladimir, due to Estragon's lack of memory, is unsure of his own memory. Vladimir enjoys the company of Estragon, for it allows him to recall past events. Together, they spend their time devising ways to pass the time until 'Godot' arrives. Neither Estragon and Vladimir or the reader surely know what Godot is or looks like or whether he will ever arrive. On two occasions, they meet Pozzo and Lucky. Pozzo is Lucky's master and decides to stop and talk to Estragon and Vladimir for a bit of company. Pozzo hardly listens to what the other characters in the play say and frequently launches into melodramatic prose. Lucky is Pozzo's slave, tied to Pozzo via a rope around his neck. Lucky only speaks twice during the entire play. His monologue, which is delivered upon Pozzo's order of 'Think', is completely incoherent - a mix of half-finished words and sentences. Lucky is very obedient to Pozzo and rather violent and hostile to strangers, especially Estragon, who he bites. In the second act, Pozzo and Lucky return again, this time Pozzo is blind and Lucky is mute. They have no memory of ever having met Estragon and Vladimir. The play ends in the same way Act One ends - Estragon and Vladimir are still dependent on eachother and remain waiting for Godot.
Waiting for Godot is a classic text of existentialism and Absurdist literature. The very ambiguous nature of these two strands of thought and literature makes Waiting for Godot extremely difficult to understand and extract. However the questions, confusion, anger and melancholy that arise from the lack of explanation, meaning and answers is one of the very themes of the play. The large amount of speculation people have made upon Godot (the most popular one being that Godot symbolizes God) is entirely misdirected and a waste of energy. Beckett himself ignored such claims and interpretations, stating that the emphasis should be upon the 'Waiting for...' section of the title. Religious interpretations see Estragon and Vladimir as humanity waiting for the return of the messiah (Godot). Pozzo represents the Pope and Lucky is the faithful. Marxist interpretations see the relationship between Pozzo and Lucky as that between a bourgeosie and a proleteriat - Pozzo being blind to the injustice he causes and Lucky unable to protest against his treatment. Another interpretation claims that Lucky is granted his name because, in the context of the play, he is unduly lucky. This is because the other characters of the play are constantly searching for ways to pass the time, while Lucky's actions are fully determined by Pozzo. Other interpretations posit Estragon as the body without the intellect and Vladimir as the intellect without the body.
Overall, Waiting for Godot is a superb and though-provoking play. It should not be shunned for its ambiguity - for that is the very beauty and theme of it. Despite all this, it certainly calls for multiple readings. It is a remarkable insight into the nature of the individual and society in a meaningless, unexplainable world. Waiting for Godot does not propose any solutions or consolations - rather it paints a picture of the current predicament and man's reaction. Nearly every human being is waiting for their Godot and is employing some means of wasting the time until its arrival. I highly recommend this classic - it cannot and will not be ignored.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What is there to get from Waiting for Godot, June 9 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Waiting for Godot - English: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts (Paperback)
I thought the play beautifully expressed in laconic dialogue how some individuals deny reality, the human condition, and mortality by distracting themselves with meaningless activies. I don't know if Beckett saw life as meaningless. The mystery of life makes all of us story tellers. It's our responsiblity to find a story, activity, purpose, gift, belief that gives our lives fullness as opposed to emptyness.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The epitome of Existentialist Literature, Oct. 5 2003
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This review is from: Waiting for Godot - English: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts (Paperback)
An existentialist tragicomedy in two acts. I loved this play-- definitely the epitome of a tragicomedy. I laughed out loud at many of the lines from Vladimir and Estragon, the main characters, as well as Pozzo, a man that happens by as they wait for Godot. The deeper themes of the play got me thinking too.
Who is Godot and why are these two men waiting for him? Good question. It's not important though-- not as important as their waiting to be saved by Godot at least. The way the characters passed away the time of their waiting made the pages fly by for me-- it seemed I had scarcely started when I was at the end!
Highly recommended. Waiting for Godot is a great, quick read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Metaphor for Life, Feb. 2 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Waiting For Godot (Paperback)
What a fabulous play. I read it over an over again and every time I discover new meaning. Admittedly, the first time I read it, I hated it. The second time I read it, I understood just how profound this play really is. But then again, that is for you to discover.
On another point. Unlike what some reviewers have asserted, Godot is not sapposed to represent God. Godot is not sapposed to represent anything in particular. Rather, to each person, he will represent something different. Again, it's for you to find that meaning within yourself.
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Waiting for Godot - English: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts
Waiting for Godot - English: A Tragicomedy in Two Acts by Samuel Beckett (Paperback - Jan. 18 1994)
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