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Showing 1-10 of 11 reviews(2 star)show all reviews
on October 9, 2000
Samuel Beckett's, Waiting for Godot, is a very interesting book. It is pretty hard to get into, though. It was very hard for me to get into because at first I really did not understand it. I kept saying to myself how stupid Didi and Gogo were. I just couldn't understand why they would not leave, why they were waiting on Godot. They would just sit around all day waiting for someone they had never met. Day after day they did the same thing, and every morning they would ask each other what they were going to do that day. Every day they had the same answer, they were going to wait on Godot. This book has a lot of references to God and the bible, but Beckett never comes out and says, "Godot is God." This really was not my kind of book. It deals with God and who God is, and not giving up on waiting for God. If you like that kind of thing, this is the perfect book for you. It will make you think and question your belief in, exactly, who God is. I will admit, I would never have read the book if it was not required for my English class, but I'm glad I did. Once I understood exactly what was going on, it was a lot more interesting. If you are someone looking for joyous reading I would not suggest you get this book, but if you are required to read it, try your best to understand it first and the reading will be a lot easier and a lot more fun for you.
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on October 9, 2000
Samuel Beckett's, Waiting for Godot, is a very interesting book. It is pretty hard to get into, though. It was very hard for me to get into because at first I really did not understand it. I kept saying to myself how stupid Didi and Gogo were. I just couldn't understand why they would not leave, why they were waiting on Godot. They would just sit around all day waiting for someone they had never met. Day after day they did the same thing, and every morning they would ask each other what they were going to do that day. Every day they had the same answer, they were going to wait on Godot. This book has a lot of references to God and the bible, but Beckett never comes out and says, "Godot is God." This really was not my kind of book. It deals with God and who God is, and not giving up on waiting for God. If you like that kind of thing, this is the perfect book for you. It will make you think and question your belief in, exactly, who God is. I will admit, I would never have read the book if it was not required for my English class, but I'm glad I did. Once I understood exactly what was going on, it was a lot more interesting. If you are someone looking for joyous reading I would not suggest you get this book, but if you are required to read it, try your best to understand it first and the reading will be a lot easier and a lot more fun for you.
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on April 29, 2000
When I give this play two stars, I am not doing so in an attempt to discredit it, or to say it is a bad piece of work. The two stars that I have given it is simply a rating on how much I understood it and its themes....which is very little. Perhaps I am not a deep enough thinker to understand this, or perhaps I was simply not in the proper frame of mind when I read it.
Regardless, "Waiting For Godot" is very much a masterpiece, but I have a hard time understanding what it is about. I do not agree with the negative reviews that it has been receiving, but on the other hand, I can understand where they're coming from-- this play is extremely hard to follow. The dialogue is very complex, and the theme, though I think if I concentrate hard enough I can understand, is so jumbled together in my head, that there are simply no words to describe it.
I urge you to read this play, if for nothing else than for how it challenges your mind. I'll be thinking about it for a long time, even if I don't quite comprehend it.
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on July 26, 1999
the entire play was on the pointlessness of our exsistance, of our waiting for an answer from somewhere (Godot, God, or whatever other translations you wish to put on it). But with the lack of development from the characters, and so much room for interpritation that one can never be sure of any of the finer points, it made for a frustrating read. In fact upon many any point that this book was attempting to make would be compleatly lost. It is in my recomodation that if you wish to read a book on the futile and pointless life that we are living, pick up "L'Estranger" by Albert Camus. And after all that I'll sit back and laugh at my self, for sitting and reading this, waiting the whole time for something to happen in this bloody play.
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on September 28, 2000
Waiting For Godot is a classic. I know it's really shaped how modern plays. But wow... this play is frustrating. It has it's moments, but for a majority the play you just want to bang Didi and Gogo's heads against one another. When I was reading this I couldn't help but wonder what people saw in it. I really had to struggle to get through it. If I hadn't been required to read it for my drama class, I would have tossed it out my 3rd-floor apartment window. Do read it if like me, you're interested in writing plays. But if you're just reading it because a friend was raving how good it was, give it a miss. They're probably just "being" pretentious drama majors who couldn't tell art from a scribble done by a two-year old.
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on August 10, 2000
To be frankly honest I have now read this book 4 times, I don't know exactly why I did so but I did and I am still confused. If you feel that you should get the book that a lot of critics call "the most important play of the 20th century" then while you're at it pick up a coles notes style book for it. But don't pay much for the interpretation book since the one I bought summed up the entire play in one paragraph that took up half a page. And I agree with one critic who described the two act play in one sentence "nothing happens...twice" Unless you have to buy this book for school or you're a large fan of plays then don't bother doing more than looking at the pretty cover art
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on August 12, 2013
I was very disappointed in this purchase. It was a very slim volume for the price. The font was too small making the text almost illegible. I had purchased it as a special gift for my husband's 60th birthday as he loved the play. The bottom line is that he has not opened it since I gave it to him. I won't be buying this type of purchase from Amazon again as you can't really tell the quality of a book on line and there didn't seem to be an avenue of returning it.
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on December 7, 1999
What conclusions can one draw from Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot? IS it that friends stick together in any stiuation? Is it that time passes but nothing really happens? Is it that we're all waiting for someone, that we call Godot that we'd like to have come and make everything right? All of the above
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 10, 2001
I find it hilarious that so many reviewers find this play "complicated" or "profound". I have to let them in on the secret: the play is neither complicated nor profound. It is absurd. This play is not about anything in particular (less than, say, Seinfeld which was "about nothing"). A bunch of people hang out on the stage and pass the time in the stupidest way possible: inane banter and stupid games. All is random and pointless, by design.
After I read the play I thought it was utter crap. But now, after I am reading this misguided reviews, I am beginning to think maybe Beckett was on to something. People really do not get it, even when it is spelled out in the very first line of the play ("nothing to do"). This habit of interpretation is so fixated in most people's consciences that they have to grasp at meaning even when it is deliberately removed from context.
This play is the ultimate farce, and the spectators are the ones getting fooled. Actually, this is not even a play, it is an exercise in audience psychology, the dramatic equivalent of ink blots. But why many enjoy being made fools of is beyond my comprehension.
Some say that Beckett "challenges the conventions of theatre", and that in itself should lend some value to the play. No thanks. Flaunting rules and convention is, in itself, not a source for value, or beauty, or truth. In "Waiting for Godot" the result of this deliberate rule-breaking is something that is utterly boring and idiotic. There is no iota of anything worthwhile in the play. Frankly, it is horrible.
For some intelligible theater of the absurd, that is theatre which has an insightful look at the absurdity of life without being itself absurd, I recommend Eugen Ionesco. His plays are far more contextualized and less ambitious, and are also quite funny.
But for some wildly entertaining theatre of the absurd nothing beats Seinfeld reruns.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 29, 2003
Okay, I know that everyone loves Beckett, that he is an artist, more than he is a writer, but that's the problem. He's too absorbed in the formal aesthetic of 'nothing', or 'absurdity', that he doesn't grant readers what they want: Character.
His entire approach (in his prose work) is derived from the last chapter in Joyce's Ulysses, which isn't nearly as remarkable as Faulkner, Gaddis, and Pynchon- who all took from Joyce and expounded, where as Beckett is only imitated.
It's old news: The men waiting for Godot argue about nothing while waiting, and Godot never shows up. It's suppose to be this grand metaphor for God(ot) (Get it?), that there isn't an inherent one, and that the waiting is the only thing which 'creates' him.
I gave up in the middle because I got the joke already, it was so obvious. Beckett had a point to make, and wrote a stoy (play) at us, instead of for us.
If you want to experiment with language, write a poem and get it over with, so you don't waste other reader's time, instead of what Beckett did, which was bury himself in only what he'd like to think only he could understand.
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