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5.0 out of 5 stars I love this book
Shiloh is a beautiful book! Its a true story, and it was made when the author came home from a vacation. During this vacation, she met a female beagle who was abused, and she couldn't get the dog out of her mind. So she created this book. The book became a big success, and the female beagle eventually found a home. In the third book of the trilogy, the back page has a...
Published on April 24 2004 by Ingrid

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3.0 out of 5 stars a story of the unbreakable connection between boy and dog
Shiloh is a story about the remarkable connection between a boy and a dog.
Marty Preston is an eleven year old boy who finds a beagle near his home. He decides to name the beagle, Shiloh. But Marty and Shiloh are both in big trouble when Marty discovers that the beagle pup belongs to Judd Tavers.
Marty will do anything to protect Shiloh. Tavers and Marty come...
Published on Nov. 23 2003 by jeanneott


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5.0 out of 5 stars I love this book, April 24 2004
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Shiloh is a beautiful book! Its a true story, and it was made when the author came home from a vacation. During this vacation, she met a female beagle who was abused, and she couldn't get the dog out of her mind. So she created this book. The book became a big success, and the female beagle eventually found a home. In the third book of the trilogy, the back page has a picture of the beagle, looking fat and happy.
Shiloh is a fantastic book because it opens the eyes of young readers, on how dogs don't live happy lives like they thought. They may start looking around for dogs living on chains, and when they see that, they think of Shiloh. They grow up and learn more about the plight of abused animals, and they're the people who'll change the world for pets. I am now 17 years old, and I still read the trilogy over and over, and tear up in many parts. I read this book as a young kid, and I grew up with it. I would highly recommend it to anyone I meet, especially people who are in contact with dogs who are starving and being neglected by their owners.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Shiloh, March 11 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
The book I just read was Shiloh by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor. Set in West Virginia. This story tells a tale of friendship. Marty is a character who is helpful to others, especially to a dog named Shiloh. Shiloh is known to be hopeful. Marty wants Shiloh but there is someone holding him back.
This book is a must read! The book brings your hopes up so much that they will want to keep turning the pages to see if he gets Shiloh. Shiloh and Marty go on adventures together together to form a great relationship. The reader becomes emotionally connected to the dog. The connection would be so great that it would change your mind about getting a beagle. Beagles like Shiloh can fill your heart with warmth at first sight.
Phyllis Reynolds Naylor is a great author with great respect. Phyllis got into writing about Shiloh because she saw a beagle on the side of the road abused. She wrote first book when she was five. Phyllis Reynolds Naylor was so into writing that she quit graduate school to start writing full time. This book was so great that I think anyone would like Shiloh even if they don't like dogs.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Come for the prose, stay for the cute beagle, Jan. 1 2004
By 
E. R. Bird "Ramseelbird" (Manhattan, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Reading this book, I had not heard of the author Phyllis Reynolds Naylor before. So I looked her up, thinking she'd probably written a book here and there before "Shiloh" her masterpiece. To my surprise, she is nothing less than prolific. There were already thirty one children's books to her name by the time "Shiloh" was written, and undoubtedly many more to come afterwards (the "Shiloh" sequels alone give one pause). The book itself is good. Not as surprisingly good as I've found her contemporary Katherine Paterson's books to be (yay Gilly Hopkins!) but fine reading just the same. Like many of my kind, I am not a dog book lover. If I hear that there's a book out there somewhere about a boy and his dog, I am probably going to do whatever it takes to avoid reading said book. In this particular case, Naylor has cleverly chosen a breed that is not only sympathetic but adorable. Shiloh is an abused beagle. I suspect that it is not difficult to get kids to identify with a dog that shares its pedigree with Snoopy. What makes the book "Shiloh" itself stand out, however, is not its cutesy factor. Many lesser books have done similar things and few have garnered Newberrys. No, this book introduces a character that I feel is perhaps one of the most well-developed "villains" I've read. Judd, the beagle kicker, is basically a transposed Jud from "Oklahoma" with a little more humanity built into his system. Here we have a man who was undoubtedly abused himself as a child and who now takes this abuse out on the animals he keeps. In time, Judd develops a grudging respect for the boy who wants to own Shiloh so very much. The boy, Marty, is an interesting little devil himself. Here's our protagonist; a kid willing to lie and blackmail in order to get his dog. He lies and blackmails all in the name of that which is good and righteous, of course, but it's interesting to see such dealings from the mouth and head of an eleven-year-old boy. Just the same, this is a worthwhile book to read. Now admittedly, as a woman of 25 years, I'm not about to ever read this book again. No sir. But a book's readability and re-readability do not always have much to do with one another. Read this book for the well drawn characters. Stay for the cute beagle.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A boy and his dog, Dec 18 2003
By 
KRA (Redding, CT) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
It is about a boy named Marty and a dog named Shiloh. During this book, Marty sees a dog that is lost and immediatly likes him. He names him Shiloh, because he finds him near the Old Shiloh schoolhouse. He brings the dog home and his parents say "Judd Travers lost his dog". Judd Travers is a mean person, he kicks his dogs! They give him back and a couple days later he comes back and Marty builds a pen for him and doesn't tell his parents because he doesn't want to give him back to Judd. Then his mom sees him and she says she will give him one day to figure out what to do. Then his dad finds out and freaks. Soon the Baker's german shepard comes and bites Shiloh close to death, the Preston's take him to Doc Murphy and he takes care of Shiloh. Then a person tells Judd and Judd comes to Marty's house and yells at him. If you want to find out what happens next read the book. My favorite part of the book is how Phyllis R. Naylor makes the accent perfect for West Virginia. I also enjoyed how she describes the characters. Marty has a nice relationship with Shiloh, one that all kids and up will enjoy. This was a school assignment, but I would still read it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Shiloh: A Review, Dec 3 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Author Phyllis Reynolds Naylor captures the heart of kindness in her book, Shiloh. The book centers around Marty Preston, an 11-year-old boy with a warm spot in his heart for Shiloh, a shy, skinny, abused beagle who follows Marty home one day.
Shiloh is owned by Judd Travers, a dog abuser and mean, illegal hunter who drinks too much alcohol.
Ma, Marty's mother, is the first person to find out that Marty was hiding Shiloh. Dad, Marty's father, believes in legal ownership and thinks that Marty should give Shiloh back. Betty, Marty's youngest sibling, annoys Marty throughout the book. Dara Lynn, Marty's middle sister, comforts Marty when he is forced to give back Shiloh.
The story takes place in Friendly, a small, rural community in West Virginia.
Marty comes upon a dog when he is walking by a creek. The dog is in horrible condition. When Marty finds out it is Judd Travers' dog, he knows he must save him. His dad forces Marty to take the dog back to Judd. The second time the dog comes to Marty, Marty names him Shiloh and secretly keeps the dog in a homemade pen.
Shiloh was a secret until Marty's mom found out about him. She tells Marty that if he doesn't run away with the dog, she'll wait to the following day to tell his dad. That night, a German Sheppard jumps over the fence of the pen and attacks Shiloh. Judd finds out that Marty had his lost dog from Doc Murphy who saves Shiloh's life. Judd demands the dog back when he recovers. When Marty is going to Judd's trailor to tell him he can't have Shiloh back, he watches in horror as Judd shoots a female deer out of season. He tells Judd he'll tell the game warden if he doesn't make a deal to sell Shiloh to Marty. Judd tells Marty that if he worked 20 hours for him he would give him Shiloh.
In the end, Marty teaches Judd to be nicer to animals and gets Shiloh for himself.
The theme of the story is to be nicer to creatures big and small, work hard for what you believe in and remember that acts of kindness can make people good.
I highly recommend this book to people of all ages.
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3.0 out of 5 stars a story of the unbreakable connection between boy and dog, Nov. 23 2003
By 
"jeanneott" (Joplin, MO USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Shiloh is a story about the remarkable connection between a boy and a dog.
Marty Preston is an eleven year old boy who finds a beagle near his home. He decides to name the beagle, Shiloh. But Marty and Shiloh are both in big trouble when Marty discovers that the beagle pup belongs to Judd Tavers.
Marty will do anything to protect Shiloh. Tavers and Marty come to an agreement. Marty works hard until finally one day Tavers gives an old dog collar to him, sealing the deal. Shiloh is finally Marty's dog.
Naylor's story of a young boy's love for his dog is sure to have animal lovers glued to this book. The story takes place in West Virginia and is told from Marty's point of view, complete with southern dialect.
Naylor based the story on her own real life experience. While visiting friends in Shiloh, West Virginia, she encountered a scared female dog near a creek. When she left for home she was filled with worry over what would happen to he dog. Knowing this her friends went searching but found nothing. One day five months later they happened upon the dog. Since then the dog has made a happy existence for herself at home with Naylor's friends.
This is a realistic, well written book that is highly deserving of the Newbery Medal. Recommended to readers of all ages, this book is sure to please.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Beagle Named Shiloh, May 28 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Shiloh, by Phyllis Naylor, is a story of boy and a dog. Marty, the boy, is walking when he sees a hurt, hungry dog by Shiloh School. He becomes attached to it and names it Shiloh (after the school). Only later he is devastated to learn Shiloh belongs to Judd Travis, a mean man who mistreats animals and hunts out of season. Marty is forced to give him back to Judd until one day when Shiloh runs away again, and returns to Marty. Marty hides him at his hill, giving him food and starts building up lies.
The idea of this book is that it is better to tell the truth than to build up lies to get something. Marty lies and lies to keep Shiloh, giving hard earned food to him.
Shiloh is written in a first person style. You can tell Marty doesn't have much of an education because of his grammar. For example, "A lie don't seem a lie anymore when it's meant to save a dog, right and wrongs all mixed up in my head". Another example is "I figure a dog's the same as a kid. You don't treat a kid right, he'll run off first chance he gets, too".
Marty's world takes place in the hills behind Friendly, West Virginia. You can tell that Marty lives in an old house and isn't having the easiest time with money. However, the family is still happy, and works hard for their food (which he gives Shiloh) that they eat.
Marty is an average 11 year old boy. He is determined to get what he wants, and has a certain way to reach his goal (even if he must lie).
Shiloh is a beagle, hungry and tired at first. He never cries and always behaves. He is extremely cute, and as you get to know him throughout the story, you can't help but wish he was your dog.
The book Shiloh is based on an event Phyllis Naylor went through, so the book is realistic fiction. When Phyllis Naylor visited West Virginia, she saw the saddest looking dog in her life. So, she wrote a book about it. Later, her friends in West Virginia told her they found the dog, took him in, and named him Clover.
Shiloh is a touching story I suggest for all dog lovers, or simply someone who wants a good story. Shiloh is the kind of book that makes you want to continue to read no matter what time or place. You constantly flip the pages.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book!, May 28 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Shiloh
The book Shiloh, a realistic fiction book, is a great book. Shiloh, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor is about this boy, Marty, who found a dog. The dog, which is eventually named Shiloh, is really hurt. Marty knows that his parents will not let him keep the dog, because his family is really poor. So Marty tries to get away from Shiloh but Shiloh follows him home. It really is interesting to see what Marty does with Shiloh.
Marty hides Shiloh in his back yard. Which is all hilly, so nobody can find him, or Shiloh. They are always at Marty's house. The only places that they really ever go to are his house and Judd Travers house. He figures if he hid him where Judd can't go and where his family hardly ever goes then Shiloh would be safe. But it turns out he was wrong.
Naylor made the characters in her book as real as she could. With Marty, the main character, you can hear what he is thinking. You can't literally hear him think, but the book says what he is thinking. If you have read Jade Green, also by Naylor, you probably know what I am saying.
This book is all about animals. It talks about animal abuse and how to try and help animals that were abused. All through the book Marty knows Judd Travers is abusing Shiloh, the meanest guy in town. He tries to tell his parents but they will not believe him. So they give Shiloh back to get more abused.
Shiloh is a very touching book. I suggest that you read it. Any body would really like it. It would be especially be good if you love animals.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Shiloh Book Review, March 27 2003
By 
Jamie Keseloff (Cerritos, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Jamie Keseloff
March 27, 2003
Period 2
Shiloh Book Review
Shiloh was written by Phyllis Renolds Naylor. A poor hopeless little beagle named Shiloh is owned by an evil hunter named Judd who treats Shiloh very bad. The neighbor boy, named Marty feels so bad for the dog and try everything to save him.
In one of the chapters, it tells how Shiloh gets hurt real bad and almost dies. Shiloh happened to be in an area when another dog attacks him. Marty hears Shiloh yelp and ran out of his house in the middle of the night to see what was happening. Shiloh's right leg was almost torn off. Marty's Dad rushed after him and they took Shiloh to the nearest Vetenarian. A few days later, Shiloh was doing better.
My favorite part of the book is when Marty's Sister, Dara Lynn followed him to check on Shiloh. Marty knew his Sister hated snakes, so he made up a story and said there was a twenty-nine foot snake. She believed him and ended up going back home.
I chose this book because I love dogs, especially Beagles. Shiloh is such an adorable, cute and fluffy animal. I can read this story over and over again and never be bored. This is one book I won't ever forget.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read for the Younger Set, March 6 2002
By 
Reginald D. Garrard "the G-man" (Camilla, GA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Shiloh (Paperback)
Although this is a "boy loves dog" story in the truest sense of the term, "Shiloh" adds the dimension of animal abuse that is a contemporary concern of all that love animals. Marty is a compassionate soul whose "hunting" is more of the investigative nature than the actual killing of an animal. This aspect of the boy's character is one of the strengths especially in light of the stereotypical view of all young boys in rural America having a passion for killing. Showing that it is just as "manly" to have concern for animals, as it to hunt them, is a concept that Ms. Naylor has cleverly presented.
By having the characters speak in the language and manner of the West Virginia hills, Naylor has added authenticity to her prose. The conversations between the respective personalities are both insightful and entertaining. As I read the book, I felt as if these were real people speaking to me in their natural manner.
Even though the principal is a boy, I am sure that all children, regardless of gender, can relate to this boy's courage and ingenuity. Marty's devotion to the animal is certainly an attribute that all should aspire to have for others.
Because of the dog's presence in the family, there are subtle changes in the family. Mother and father discover maturity in their son that hey had not seen before; the boy becomes closer to his younger sisters; and Marty realizes that he possesses perseverance and resourcefulness that would benefit him for the rest of his days. Even an "enemy" of Marty becomes a respectful acquaintance.
When I first began reading the book, I thought that it would take me through familiar territory. However, I was pleasantly surprised at its originality.
I cared for this boy and his dog.
Children will also have these same feelings.
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