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5.0 out of 5 stars Angela Carter would be pleased
The FIFTH in the series of altered faery tales, it's a heckuva good time. Evidently a modern fantasy trend, Datlow and Windling can't put these out fast enough; I believe there's at least 2 following this. These tales are good reads in their own right, but add the satisfying pop-pyschology crunch of being able to dissect the original tale through its modern and...
Published on Nov. 13 2000 by missxaos

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good and bad
Silver Birch, Blood Moon mixes good re-tellings with horrible ones. It has stories that are funny, evil, good, terrible, brand new, re-told, and many others. I don't feel like I wasted my time reading it but there are better out there. I guess it is the same with all mixed books. I enjoyed a lot of the stories, despised about as many. I loved the re-telling of The Little...
Published on Aug. 19 2001 by A. Roberts


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3.0 out of 5 stars Good and bad, Aug. 19 2001
By 
A. Roberts - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Silver Birch, Blood Moon mixes good re-tellings with horrible ones. It has stories that are funny, evil, good, terrible, brand new, re-told, and many others. I don't feel like I wasted my time reading it but there are better out there. I guess it is the same with all mixed books. I enjoyed a lot of the stories, despised about as many. I loved the re-telling of The Little Mermaid in The Sea Hag, but didn't aprove of The Glass Cofin which was just depressing. It was a good book and was enjoyable. I recomend it.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A sad, sad thing, June 1 2001
Somebody made a grave mistake! I was surprised by the lack of good stories in this one as compared to the other dark fairy-tale collections by these editors, all of which were endlessly satisfying to me. This book I bought on a whim before I had read it....what a waste of money! Terribly dissapointing, although there are decent parts in the book, hidden in a nook or cranny if you look enough. Save yourself the money and rent this from the library if you don't believe me...maybe you'll end up agreeing with me.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Angela Carter would be pleased, Nov. 13 2000
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"missxaos" (Cincinnati, OH United States) - See all my reviews
The FIFTH in the series of altered faery tales, it's a heckuva good time. Evidently a modern fantasy trend, Datlow and Windling can't put these out fast enough; I believe there's at least 2 following this. These tales are good reads in their own right, but add the satisfying pop-pyschology crunch of being able to dissect the original tale through its modern and fractured counterpart and you've got a great read. While again, these are being turned out like organic vegetarian pizzas in Hell-A, I never felt cheated or subjected to a formula. These authors are varied in language and message, even if some themes are awfully similar. The worst that can be said about this particulair series is that it may have a feminist slant at times, being written mostly (16 out of 20) by women, and likely FOR, women, screw it. If you've got a problem with it, go grab something that Mike Whelan drew the cover art for. While some of the themes are a bit heavy, (domestic violence / female oppression in "Kiss Kiss") overall, it's pretty light-hearted, and dang it (can I say it again), it makes you think in an easy, cerebral but not all-encompassing way about the folktales that shaped our imaginations and interesting modifications of them. Pick it up, and the rest, too. I'll warn you if, as is inevitable in fiction trends, it becomes overdone and heavy-handed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, Nov. 13 2000
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"missxaos" (Cincinnati, OH United States) - See all my reviews
The FIFTH in the series of altered faery tales, it's a heckuva good time. Evidently a modern fantasy trend, Datlow and Windling can't put these out fast enough; I believe there's at least 1 more following this. These tales are good reads in their own right, but add the satisfying pop-pyschology crunch of being able to dissect the original tale through its modern and fractured counterpart and you've got a great read. While again, these are being turned out like organic vegetarian pizzas in Hell-A, I never felt cheated or subjected to a formula. These authors are varied in language and message, even if some themes are awfully similar. The worst that can be said about this particulair series is that it may have a feminist slant at times, being written mostly (16 out of 20) by women, and likely FOR, women, screw it. If you've got a problem with it, go grab something that Mike Whelan drew the cover art for. While some of the themes are a bit heavy, (domestic violence / female oppression in "Kiss Kiss") overall, it's pretty light-hearted, and dang it (can I say it again), it makes you think in an easy, cerebral but not all-encompassing way about the folktales that shaped our imaginations and interesting modifications of them. Pick it up, and the rest, too. I'll warn you if, as is inevitable in fiction trends, it becomes overdone and heavy-handed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Additional information on this book:, Oct. 19 2000
By A Customer
I have just learned that this book has been short-listed for the World Fantasy Award, 2000. Congratulations!
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5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding volume of stories, Oct. 15 2000
By A Customer
This volume is #5 in a series of fairy tales re-told for adults and I found it to be as satisfying and exceptional as the previous volumes. I won't list my favorite stories since every reader's taste is different, and what one likes best, another will like least. What I can tell you however is that the stories are wonderfully varied in tone and approach and the book courageously mixes Big Name authors with talented lesser known writers. I have always appreciated this about all the Datlow and Windling collections, and have learned about many wonderful new writers through them. One thing you can count on with their books is that all stories, whether to your personal taste or not, are of exceptionally high literary quality, showing why Datlow and Windling are widely considered the top editors of the fantasy field. I, for one, trust their editorial taste and am so grateful for all the hard work they have done to bring us this and many other collections over the years, and to provide a market for short story writers. I consider this a truly first rate collection, and Ms. Datlow and Ms. Windling have the deep gratitude of this lover of adult fairy tales.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Some good, some bad, but worth a look, Aug. 22 2000
By 
Sara (New York, NY) - See all my reviews
As with any anthology, every writer has a different style, and some of the styles you won't be wild about. But being an anthology, you can also skip over stories that aren't meeting your expectations.
I'll start with the worst stories. Tanith Lee, whose voice is usually sensual and mesmerizing falls a little flat with 'Kiss Kiss', a new take of the Frog Prince tale. 'Toad' another Frog Prince story is also a bore, but still, the worst are pretty much just stories that don't stand out in the whole of the book.
My favorite short stories were probably these ones: 1)Glass Coffin by Caitlin R. Kiernan was a lyrical and haunting mixture of Sleeping Beauty and Snow White. 2)Precious by Nalo Hopkinson is a story that goes past the story and wonders what happens to the girl who's been 'blessed' with jewels every time she talks. 3)The Sea Hag by Melissa Lee Shaw is a great story that goes behind the whole 'villian' persona and gives the 'villian' her own voice. 4)Ivory Bones by Susan Wade is a poetic and saddening story of Thumbelina with an ending not expected. 5)The Wild Heart by Anne Bishop was another haunting story by Anne Bishop, who has a natural talent for writing.
There are other worthwhile entries, such as Clad in Gossamer and The Shell Box to check out. Overall it is a satisfying read of adult fairy tales.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Dark Fun, May 13 2000
By 
J. Austin "jodylync" (Dublin, OH United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Remember those Fairy Tales you read when you were a kid? There were evil stepmothers, good fairies, greedy kings, and beautiful princesses. Even though these stories had happy endings, you still felt there was something dark just under the surface that just didn't quite add up. This book (and others in the series) takes your favorite tales and shows you what might have been going on behind the scenes. An adult twist to children's tales.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Some roses among the weeds, Aug. 5 1999
By A Customer
This is the latest in a series of fairy tales refashioned for 20th century grownups. Edited by Datlow and Windling, these original stories are by various authors -- some justifiably famous, others just as justifiably obscure. It's a mixed bundle. Standouts are Garry Kilworth's "The Frog Chauffeur," "Toad-Rich" Michael Cadnum, "Ivory Bones" by Susan Wade, and "The Sea Hag" by Melissa Lee Shaw. Nancy Kress is always worth looking for, and her "Clad in Gossamer" is no exception with its new twist on "The Emperor's New Clothes." Other worthwhile entries are Russell William Asplund's "The Dybbuk in the Bottle," Anne Bishop's "The Wild Heart," and Pat York's "You Wandered Off Like A Foolish Child To Break Your Heart and Mine." Disappointments are (surprisingly) Tanith Lee's "Kiss Kiss," "Toad" by Patricia A. McKillip, and (unsurprisingly) "The Shellbox" by Karawynn Long, who once again typically pads a story with too much maudlin emotional weight for its bones. Like the others in the series, this anthology is worth purchasing in paperback form. Its good stories can be excellent. Others are good to not- painful. The worst are no worse than forgettable.
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