Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage pinata Cook Kindle Music Deals Store Cycling Tools minions


Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-2 of 2 reviews(4 star)show all reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 1, 2004
This handy guide endeavors to reduce the complex challenge of ethical leadership - with which great minds have struggled for thousands of years - to six simple and absolute rules of honesty. The authors, Larry Johnson and Bob Phillips, clearly explain each rule of absolute honesty they have derived and provide many illustrative anecdotes and examples drawn from daily life. There is a fascinating, moving story of one co-author's unforgettable experience as a high school track star, and another account about a couple whose marriage ended in divorce after the wife insisted on acting dishonestly. Perhaps the authors believed that this volume would move even the greatest crooks to resolute and unswerving honesty. Alas, that is beyond their scope. However We find that ordinary businesspeople seeking general guidelines might find useful counsel here. Hey, at least it's a start.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on June 11, 2003
If you've ever disagreed with a manager or a co-worker and you've been scared to speak up, then this is the book for you! If you've ever known someone who thought that retribution was fair play, that there were "many levels" of honesty, that people who disagree simply aren't "team players", that public chastisement is acceptable, or that people with ideas different from their own are "just being confrontational", then this is the book for them.
This book is the only clear, precise, articulate book in support of unconditional integrity that I've seen in the management literature. It makes a great companion to Stephen Covey's "7 Habits" and Blane Lee's "Power Principle" because it builds a profound case for the value of honest dialog in interdependent relationships. Best of all, the book provides A MYRIAD OF EXAMPLES of what to do and not to do in situations of constructive confrontation.
Bottom line... buy yourself the book... buy your friends the book... and, your boss, well... if you think she'll be offended when you give her the book, then it's probably the best gift you can give her.
Steve
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse