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5.0 out of 5 stars Schaeffer diagnoses modern-day ills and prescribes cure
Do you value liberty, reason, science, individualism and progress? If so, read this short book by Christian philosopher Francis Schaeffer to learn why these and other western values are hanging in the balance today. Schaeffer offers an explanation of the Renaissance, Reformation and Enlightenment that is in agreement with the traditional view of history that our most...
Published on Sept. 28 2000 by Steven P. Sawyer

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3.0 out of 5 stars Schaeffer filled a void in the 80's, but not anymore
Francis Schaeffer's books filled a huge vacuum in evangelical thought. In the 1980's, Schaeffer broke new ground by giving Christian fundamentalism an intellectual voice that it otherwise did not have at the time. For thoughtful Christians, Schaeffer was like a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately, Schaeffer's rationalism only creates more confusion about the nature of...
Published on May 26 2000 by Clarke H. Morledge


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5.0 out of 5 stars Schaeffer diagnoses modern-day ills and prescribes cure, Sept. 28 2000
By 
Steven P. Sawyer (Phoenix, AZ USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
Do you value liberty, reason, science, individualism and progress? If so, read this short book by Christian philosopher Francis Schaeffer to learn why these and other western values are hanging in the balance today. Schaeffer offers an explanation of the Renaissance, Reformation and Enlightenment that is in agreement with the traditional view of history that our most cherished western values are fruits of our Judeo-Christian tradition. This view has been promoted by such thinkers as Burke, Tocqueville and Acton. An excellent modern defense is given by M. Stanton Evans in his book The Theme is Freedom. Schaeffer's treatment is philosophically deep and historically broad, although the book's short length severely limits consideration of detail.
Schaeffer sees the true beginning of the humanistic Renaissance in the work of Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274). Aquinas' dualistic Grace/Nature scheme was useful in many ways, but its critical flaw was in failing to recognize man's fallen intellect along with his fallen will. Aquinas saw man's intellect as essentially undamaged by the Fall. This had the unfortunate consequence of setting up man's intellect as autonomous and independent.
Aquinas adapted parts of Greek philosophy to Christianity, perhaps most importantly (and with the most negative consequences) the dualistic view of man and world as represented by the Grace/Nature split. As Schaeffer stresses, the main danger of a dualistic scheme is that, eventually, the lower sphere "eats up" the upper sphere. Another way to say the same thing is, once the lower sphere is given "autonomy," it tends to deny the existence or importance of whatever is in the upper sphere in support of its own autonomy.
Schaeffer explains how the Grace/Nature dualism eventually became the Freedom/Nature, then the Faith/Rationality split. He introduces his interesting idea of the Line of Despair, which began in philosophy with Hegelian relativism. Kierkegaard was the first major figure after this line. The line of despair is the point in history at which philosophers (and others) gave up on the age-old hope of a unified (i.e. not dualistic) answer for knowledge and life.
This new despairing way of thinking spread in 3 ways; geographically, from Germany outward to Europe, England and finally much later to America. Then by classes, from the intellectuals to the workers via the mass media (the middle classes were largely unaffected and remained a product of the Reformation, thankfully for stability, but this is why the middle class didn't understand its own children). Finally, it spread by disciplines; philosophy (Hegel), art (post-impressionists), music (Debussy), general culture (early T S Eliot)...then lastly theology (Barth).
Once this way of thinking set in, Schaeffer explains the need for "the leap," promoted by both secular and religious existentialists. On the secular side, Sartre located this leap in "authenticating oneself by an act of the will," Jaspers spoke of the need for the "final experience" and Heidegger talked of 'angst,' the vague sense of dread resulting from the separation of hope from the rational 'downstairs.' On the religious side, we have Barth preaching the lack of any interchange between the upper and lower spheres, using the higher criticism to debunk parts of the Bible, but saying we should believe it anyway. "'Religious truth' is separated from the historical truth of the Scriptures. Thus there is no place for reason and no point of verification. This constitutes the leap in religious terms. Aquinas opened the door to an independent man downstairs, a natural theology and a philosophy which were both autnomous from the Scriptures. This has led, in secular thinking, to the necessity of finally placing all hope in a non-rational upstairs" (p. 53, thus the book's title). This is in contrast to the biblical and Reformation message that even though man is fallen, he can and must search the scriptures to find the verifiable truth. Schaeffer devotes alot of space in his book to illustrating the many ways modern men have taken this "leap," assuming there is no rational way upstairs.
Schaeffer ends with a call to reject dualism and return to the reformation view of the scriptures, which is that God has spoken truth not only about Himself, but about the cosmos and history (p. 83). In order to do this, man must give up rationalism (i.e. autonomous reason), but by doing so he can retrieve rationality. "Modern man longs for a different answer than the answer of his damnation. He did not accept the Line of Despair and the dichotomy because he wanted to. He accepted it because, on the basis of the natural development of his rationalistic presuppositions, he had to. He may talk bravely at times, but in the end it is despair" (p. 82). No area of life can be autonomous of what God has said, since this will inevitably lead to the destruction of all value (including God, freedom and man). By placing all human activity within the framework of what God has told us, "it gives us the form inside which, being finite, freedom is possible" (p. 84).
God created man as significant, and he still is, even in his fallen and lost state. He is not a machine, plant or animal. He continues to bear the marks of "mannishness" (p. 89): love, rationality, longing for significance, fear of non-being, and so on. He will never be nothing.
The author emphasizes the existence of certain unchanging facts, which are true regardless of the shifting tides of man's thoughts. He challenges Christians to understand these tides and speak the unchanging truth in a way that can be understood in the midst of them.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Schaeffer filled a void in the 80's, but not anymore, May 26 2000
By 
Clarke H. Morledge (Williamsburg, VA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
Francis Schaeffer's books filled a huge vacuum in evangelical thought. In the 1980's, Schaeffer broke new ground by giving Christian fundamentalism an intellectual voice that it otherwise did not have at the time. For thoughtful Christians, Schaeffer was like a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately, Schaeffer's rationalism only creates more confusion about the nature of Christian truth. He correctly talks about the "line of despair" in Western culture, but he draws it in the wrong place. He tends to demonize Kierkegaard in a way that is less than helpful. He shows a complete misunderstanding of Karl Barth -- a burden that Schaeffer passed onto evangelicalism in a way that continues to keep many evangelicals from appreciating Barth's radically orthodox Christological insight for a postmodern age. The best I can say about Schaeffer, for which I am truly thankful, is that he opened up the door for a new generation of Christian thinkers who can engage the challenges of contemporary thought in a more accurate, compelling and compassionate way. Schaeffer was just about all you could read 20 years ago that was intellectually and evangelically insightful. I'm just thankful that there is better stuff available now.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Very Poor, June 23 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
This is a very poor book. Schaffer's analysis of Aquinas is fundamentally wrong and his contention that Aquinas is responsible for issuing in the modern age and reason's revolt against revelation is false. Schaffer claims that because St. Thomas asserted that reason can know some truths independent of divine revelation, he allowed reason to exist in its own autonomous sphere and this led to the view that belief in God is dispensible and reason alone is supreme. St. Thomas taught that there are things that can be known from the light of reason. This is of course, self evident and it is even biblical (see Romans 1:20 where St. Paul even asserts that the existence of God can be known from the knowledge of created things, so that all have knowledge of God, even those without Divine REvelation in the Scriptures). So Schaffer is clearly wrong even from a biblical point of view (which he claims to espouse). Also, his analysis of existentialism is perhaps partially correct from a point of view, but it is superficial. All in all, this book gives a distorted view of western thought. I would recommend reading Frederick Copleston's 9 Volume History of PHilosophy to get a much more balanced and thorough account of the development of western philosophy and christian thought.
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1.0 out of 5 stars A worthless book plagued by ignorance and a miserable logic., Aug. 21 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
With this book, Schaeffer has two noble aims:

1 to analyze the evolution of philosophy from the Christian Middle-Ages up to the Atheist existentialism of Sartres,
2 to show that Atheism and Mysticism are non-sense and that only Christianity is true.

Unfortunately Schaeffer lamentably fails.

Concerning the history of philosophy the book is plagued by Schaeffer's ignorance. For example his blaming of Aquinas for the decline of Christianity is completely unfounded and simply false. Aquinas is the father of most consistent, soundly-founded and complete Christian philosophy ever built. The fideism (blind faith) of the Luther, Kierkegaard or the Agnosticism of Kant should rather be blamed for the decline of Christianity.

Concerning Schaeffer's defense of Christianity, one can only be appalled at the misery of Schaeffer's logic. That Atheism and Mysticism are irrational entails in no way that the Bible is God's word or that Chistianity is true! Yet this is how Schaeffer reasons!
The book has also some interesting insights on the history of art, but I am unable to evaluate them .

Schaeffer could be thought of as the worst among the famous Christian "thinker " of the century. But was Schaeffer really Christian? He did not believe in the doctrine of hell and eternal damnation , a most basic Christian doctrine contained in all Christian creeds, neither did he believe in some other Christian doctrines.

I would not recommend his books to readers who appreciate logic, cogent arguments and well-researched studies. I recommend instead some books written by authors that are really Christian and can think logically:

- the works of Norman L Geisler, James P Moreland, William L Craig and Douglas Geivett. These evangelical professors of philosophy are currently the best Christian thinkers and their works are outstanding. Most of their books are written in an academic style, although a few are more popular works.

- the non-fiction books of the Anglican Clive S Lewis for those who appreciate literary writings (although his writings are somewhat old).

- the Socratic dialogues written by the Roman Peter Kreeft. They are really fun to read
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5.0 out of 5 stars The prophet of the 20th Century speaks, Oct. 3 2000
By 
WTM (Springfield, MO) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
This is a rather small book. Including the index, it has only 96 pages. But the contents of 'Escape From Reason' delivered on its claim as a penetrating analysis of trends in modern thought.
Francis A. Schaeffer had the insight to see into the near future by analyzing popular thought and showing that by bringing them to their logical conclusions, they usher in an era of chaos and moral irresponsibility. He demonstrated how the escapism of modernism and post-modernism only leads to absurdity and madness. The only way Schaeffer saw that anyone can transcend the absurd is the belief in a personal God who loves, expressing this love in God's Son Jesus. Good advice from a legendary saint.
I recommend this book to the student of philosophy, history, apologetics, and any Christian who wants to see a clear and well thought out discourse of Christian thought.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Still fills a vacuum in evangelical thought, Jan. 8 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
Schaeffer's understandings of Kierkegaard and Barth are right on the money. His "rationalism" (i.e. belief in a rational God Whose Logos became incarnate in Jesus Christ) is in fact the only proper and possible harmonization of Christianity and reason. Neither one can last long without the other.

If God isn't "bound" by "human" logic and if the Bible can contain genuine paradoxes (a la Barth), then why do we bother defending the quaint and outmoded doctrine that the Bible is free of contradictions? Or do those who damn Schaeffer with faint praise wish to dispense with that doctrine too?

That there are still some readers who think Barth was "orthodox" proves only that Schaeffer's book is just as timely now as it was early in the twentieth century.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Book to get a general overview of the major thoughts, July 16 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
This book is a good start for those who would like to get a general overview of the major thoughts and trends that shaped the Western thought since the Renaissance to the present. Schaeffer provides insightful analyses of major thinkers and how they have contributed to the modern age thinking. However, the author seems to generalize things quite a bit. It is almost impossible to shink thousands of years of history and comment on one small book, obviously, many things are being left off. Nevertherless, Schaeffer's commentaries and thoughts are worthwhile reading.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Book to get a general overview of the major thoughts, July 16 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
This book is a good start for those who would like to get a general overview of the major thoughts and trends that shaped the Western thought since the Renaissance to the present. Schaeffer provides insightful analyses of major thinkers and how they have contributed to the modern age thinking. However, the author seems to generalize things quite a bit. It is almost impossible to shink thousands of years of history and comment on one small book, obviously, many things are being left off. Nevertherless, Schaeffer's commentaries and thoughts are worthwhile reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book is highly thought provocing., July 22 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
Schaeffer has unlocked the thought proccess of western society. His understanding and research is tight. He has traced how man has tried to erase God out of History, and how that bold endevor has left man hopless and searching for something to fill the void. These 90 pages are filled with more knowledge, insight and understanding than I have read in along time. This book is for people how love to think.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Schaeffer is a true 3-dimentional thinker...a great book, May 8 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Escape from Reason (Paperback)
Francis Schaeffer was one of the most forward-thinkers of our day. In this work, he covers a huge amount of terriotory, and gives an accurate view of culture and thought. He doesn't attempt to go into exhaustive detail, which might frustrate some philosophy students, but his big-picture viewpoint makes him highly readable, understandable, and deadly accurate. Put on your "must-read" list.
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Escape from Reason
Escape from Reason by Francis A. Schaeffer (Paperback - Dec 26 2006)
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