Customer Reviews


20 Reviews
5 star:
 (14)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Theory of Constraints (TOC) will change the way you think
Eliyahu Goldratt's "The Goal" is an entertaining novel and at the same time a thought provoking business book. The story is about a plant manager, Alex Rogo, whose plant and marriage are going downhill. He finds himself in the unenviable position of having ninety days in which to save his plant. A fortuitous meeting with an old acquaintance, Jonah, introduces him to the...
Published on March 23 2008 by Avinash Sharma, The Yogic Manager

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars CD Edition: What were they thinking???
There was enough said about the content of the book. It is, indeed, insightful and well-written. My comments are about the audio edition. This book comes on 9 CDs. However, each CD is not broken up into tracks, so if you want to listen again to a fragment, you have to start from the beginning of the CD! What a waste of time! I wanted to make notes on the main concept of a...
Published on Oct. 14 2003 by Lala Mamedov


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Theory of Constraints (TOC) will change the way you think, March 23 2008
This review is from: The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement (Paperback)
Eliyahu Goldratt's "The Goal" is an entertaining novel and at the same time a thought provoking business book. The story is about a plant manager, Alex Rogo, whose plant and marriage are going downhill. He finds himself in the unenviable position of having ninety days in which to save his plant. A fortuitous meeting with an old acquaintance, Jonah, introduces him to the Theory of Constrains (TOC). He uses this new way of thinking to ...
TOC postulates that for an organization to have an ongoing process of improvement, it needs to answer three fundamental questions:
1. What to change?
2. To what to change?
3. How to cause the change?
The goal is to make (more) money, which is done by the following:
1. Increase Throughput
2. Reduce Inventory
3. Reduce Operating Expense
Goldratt defines throughput (T) as the rate at which the system generates money through sales. He also defines inventory (I) as everything the system invests in that it intends to sell. Operating expense (OE) is defined as all the money the system spends in order to convert inventory into throughput.
The author does an excellent job explaining his concepts, especially how to work with constraints and bottlenecks (processes in a chain of processes, such that their limited capacity reduces the capacity of the whole chain). He makes the reader empathize with Alex Rogo and his family and team. Don't be surprised if you find yourself cheering for Alex to succeed.
The importance and benefits of focusing on the activities that are constraints are clearly described with several examples in "The Goal". One example from the book is the one in which Alex takes his son and a group of Boy Scouts out on a hiking expedition. Here Alex faces a constraint in the form of the slowest boy, Herbie. Alex gets to apply two of the principles Jonah talked to him about - "dependent events" (events in which the output of one event influences the input to another event) and "statistical fluctuations" (common cause variations in output quantity or quality). He realizes that in a chain of dependent processes, statistical fluctuations can occur at any step. These result in time lags between the processes that accumulate and grow in size further down the chain. This leads to the performance of the system becoming worse than the average capacity of the constraint.
It is interesting to note that TOC practitioners often refer to TOC concepts in terms of references from this book. For example, a constraint is often called a Herbie.
The Goldratt Institute (goldratt dot com) has illustrated TOC Analysis in the form of five steps used as a foundation upon which solutions are built:
1. Identify the constraint
2. Decide how to exploit the constraint
3. Subordinate and synchronize everything else to the above decisions
4. Elevate the performance of the constraint
5. If, in any of the above steps the constraint has shifted, go back to Step 1
Although this book is excellent in the context of Operations, the "Goal" to "make (more) money by..." is limited in its focus. It is concerned with the cost centers internal to a business. Business performance in today's increasingly competitive market depends on a variety of factors that exist outside the business. These include competitors, external opportunities, customers and the non-customers. Executives need to focus on these in order to see the bigger picture.
This book is necessary reading at the best MBA programs. In addition to being a review, this write-up was intended to serve as a summary of the core concepts of this book and TOC. If you are reading this as part of your coursework, please feel free to share the link with your fellow students.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Goal: A great business novel, Dec 3 2009
By 
Doug Kyle "LucidAvenue.com" (Edmonton, AB Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement (Paperback)
The Goal is a fantastic business novel that wraps up a whole lot of common sense that most of us miss. The novel follows Alex Rogo, a manager in a manufacturing plant that is in danger of going out of business as he and his team figure out how to get back into the black and making money. Aside from being a reasonably well written novel, the advice provided through out the book is great and has application in many more areas of business and industry than just manufacturing.

The first point of common sense it comes to is the goal of any business. In its simplest form, the goal of every business should be to make money. This gets elaborated on more in the statement: The goal is to make money by increasing net profit while simultaneously increasing ROI and simultaneously increasing cash flow. This is done through these areas:
Throughput: the rate a system generates money through sales. This is your money coming into the system.
Inventory: all the money that the system has invested in purchasing things which it intends to sell. This is money stuck in the system.
Operational Expense: All the money the system spends in order to turn inventory into throughput. This is the money going out of the system.

While all of this will likely make sense to anyone in business, the even more valuable lesson learned within the book is the importance of measuring these three areas and NOT worrying so much about irrelevant measurements, which is pretty much every other measurement we seem to use. Examples of what not to measure in manufacturing seemed to focus around efficiencies and keeping people busy while in software, it would be common measurements such as lines of code written per hour or a daily defect fix rate. While I have no doubt people will quickly disagree with this concept, the genius of the book is showing just how important these measurements are.

Once Alex and his team come to understand this, they then delve into managing by the theory of constraints which, after realizing the above, focuses on
What to change.
What it has to change to and
How to change it.
The book is very effective due to its readability and common sense approach and definitely worth a read.

Written by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox

Goldratt`s site, while advertising his consulting and services also has a number of good free resources on the theory of constraints and more.
[...].
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The process is the thing., Jan. 28 2004
This review is from: Goal (Revised) (Audio CD)
This book is written as one person's personal journey of discovery. It is a fast paced novel, almost a thriller, which dramatically demonstrates the power of modern management in the setting of saving a factory that is rapidly heading for disaster.
I recommend this book to people in industry who have to deal with manufacturing and quality assurance and to anybody who wants to understand the continuous improvement paradigm for running a business.
The book is a pretty fine read in its own right as a novel and it is especially relevant to anyone who wants to improve an operation such as an assembly line or manufacturing plant.
As usual here is a quote from the book however this has been edited down a bit from the original to better illustrate the point:
"Who is going to set up the other machines in t he bottleneck area?" he asks. "We will pull helpers who know enough to set up their own equipment from non-bottleneck machines" "Well I guess we can try it," says Bob. "But what happens if stealing people turns non-bottlenecks into new bottlenecks?" I tell him, "The important thing is to maintain flow. If we take a worker away, and we can't maintain flow, then we'll put the worker back and steal a body from someplace else."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A must-read business classic, May 18 2003
By 
Mark E "wreave" (Colorado Springs, CO USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Goal (Revised) (Audio CD)
This book is the ultimate paradox - a "business novel", a love story in fact. It is the first in Goldratt's series following Alex Rogo, and how he turns his manufacturing plant around through some relatively simple (though not necessarily easy) principles. It is through this book that Goldratt introduces the reader to his Theory of Constraints, which should rank among the top five business concepts of the 20th century (including, for example, six sigma and the assembly line).
Not in a manufacturing business? This book is set in a manufacturing plant, but the concepts apply broadly. I currently work in a service business, with no tangible products whatsoever, and the keys of this book are as useful here as anywhere.
This book is engaging and easy to read, but it's not written to the lowest common denominator. It's for people who want to improve the way their business is run, no matter what level they are - though obviously, the higher you are, the bigger impact you can have.
I read this book for the first time in college, and have reread it every two or three years since. It belongs in the company of such business and self-help classics as Seven Habits, See You at the Top, One Minute Manager, and Win Friends/Influence People. Perhaps the highest recommendation I can give this book is that I have bought it and given it as a gift, out of my own pocket, to about half a dozen different people in the company I have worked for over the last six years - all VPs, SVPs, and EVPs. I figure, if they apply the principles, it's ultimately going to make the company (and me) more successful. All of them have commented positively on the book, and some have in turn passed it along.
Whether you are just starting out in business, or have already attained a high level and want to broaden (and brighten) your horizons, this is a must-read that will positively impact your business, and your life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars CD Edition: What were they thinking???, Oct. 14 2003
By 
Lala Mamedov (San Jose, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Goal (Revised) (Audio CD)
There was enough said about the content of the book. It is, indeed, insightful and well-written. My comments are about the audio edition. This book comes on 9 CDs. However, each CD is not broken up into tracks, so if you want to listen again to a fragment, you have to start from the beginning of the CD! What a waste of time! I wanted to make notes on the main concept of a Goal, and I had to listen to the entire CD three times to get to the section I needed. After the third time, I just gave up and returned the whole book. If this is the way this publishing house formats all audio books, I will never buy another book published by them.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars genius, Oct. 4 2011
This review is from: The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement (Paperback)
I recommend this book with all my heart to the regular folk, especially to ones that find themselves putting fires out daily. I love the fact that you have to make your own deductions to learn anything out of the book, which then stays with you for a life time. Nothing is put in front of you in a silver plate. I praise Mr. Goldratt.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Easy and Interesting Read, Dec 2 2002
By 
David Tomanio (Fort Lauderdale, FL) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Goal (Revised) (Audio CD)
I was asked to read this book as part of a graduate level operations management class I am taking for my MBA. At first I thought how good could this book possibly be? But much to my surprise it was very good, because of the author's ability to weave a story around among other things, the principles of production and capacity planning. Pretty dull stuff wrapped up in the form of a fast moving, interesting story that can apply to any manufacturing company.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, Dec 4 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm an Engineer and I totally recommend this book to anyone who is interested in a good story that serves as a lesson in supply chain and has no or minimal experience in the field. It is easy to relate to the main character and the book makes you want to keep reading it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very good primer, Nov. 6 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I enjoyed this book as an examination of TOC. I don't love the fiction narrative as a format. While it gives a clear example, it took a bit longer than needed to get to the point. Still, a very strong book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful approach to management, May 26 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This management book is written as a good detective novel that can be read at one or two sittings. It also packs a punch in terms of management principles that go well beyond the manufacturing environment that it describes, and then deals with in detail. The management principles are shown to be implementable in a wide variety of situations for profit and for people. For example, it begins by showing how a limited goal, such as making money, can be translated into increased productivity, innovation and other worthy goals, all with this most inviting approach: business and life as a novel. It was recommended by my son-in-law when I asked if there was a book that invited students to study business, rather than telling them. I'm going to try and make 'The Goal' standard reading for my senior business and ethics classes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement
The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement by Jeff Cox (Paperback - July 2004)
Used & New from: CDN$ 1.58
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews