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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eye Opener!!!
Pros: Easy read, exposes pitfalls, many helpful ideas and many paradigm shifts, excellent!
Cons: Challenging concept for my business of one. No Index.
This is an easy read that took me two days to get through. It's simple, repetitive and just the way I like it. But by no means simplistic. To me, it is well written, when the author gets their ideas across quickly...
Published on May 2 2004

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars There are better books out there.
This book was recommended to me, but it was a very hard read with very little payback. Can't even find the energy to write a review on it.
Published 6 months ago by Ideal North


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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eye Opener!!!, May 2 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
Pros: Easy read, exposes pitfalls, many helpful ideas and many paradigm shifts, excellent!
Cons: Challenging concept for my business of one. No Index.
This is an easy read that took me two days to get through. It's simple, repetitive and just the way I like it. But by no means simplistic. To me, it is well written, when the author gets their ideas across quickly and makes them seem easy. The book gets personal about the author as it tries to relate itself to the reader, yet shows a sense of writing maturity in it's simple delivery of so broad a topic. It also gets personal about you as you discover that your business is a reflection of you.
A mixture of experience and facts, blue prints and rules told in a conversational story with a semi-fictional character. This style of using a third party character to clarify and reinforce the ideas worked well with me. It helped balance and pace the lessons with a fine sense of timing and added perspective. The book is informational, motivational and even funny at times.
Gerber sets the stage by prefacing the four ideas that are the basis of the book's lessons. He identifies and compares three personalities being The Entrepreneur, The Manager and The Technician in us and shows us how and why most businesses fail. He identifies phases of the entrepreneurial business as infancy, adolescence and maturity and the pitfalls of each. He covers six rules on how to shift from working 'in' your business to working 'on' it. And goes over the three activities to help it evolve being, Innovation, Quantification and Orchestration, systems to blueprint your business. He covers the Business Development Process and to think of how to turn it into a franchise that is a saleable Turn-Key business. He then explains the seven steps to developing your business, which he covers in detail but some didn't inspire my confidence, as they are large subjects in themselves. Like, 'Your Marketing Strategy' or Your People Strategy'. But they do develop a framework from where to start and the questions to ask yourself. He constantly helps focus us by asking excellent thought and direction provoking questions.
The book packed with many useful ideas and principles if you decide to buy into them, however is also a way for him to sell his services. By occasionally positioning his company or website as a source of answers to some of the questions the book poses is a great form of self-promotion, however they may be disguised in a story. Some thoughts that came to mind while reading were, why not just find and utilize a mentor? Success leaves clues. I struggled with the though that all businesses are started with one thing in mind and that is to sell it for a profit. The book has many paradigm shifts like this one that challenge us to look at our companies in a different light. Only when I realized that I didn't have to sell my business (If I happened to build an IBM) did I understand the idea. I'm still struggling with finding a compelling vision of how to turn my particular service business of one into a salable entity. Maybe I need to visit his website and enlist in the services he offers. Maybe I just need to find a few successful role models within my business. I will read it again in a few weeks.
I would have liked to see an index in the back to help find needed references quickly. Maybe a future publishing might get one?
A healthy experienced perspective and a plan to help build a successful business life.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The E-Myth Revisited, Dec 18 2006
This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
Views from a larger company CEO Blog, April 10, 2006

I recently re-read E-Myth and E-Myth revisited by Michael Gerber ([...] His thesis is to work on the business, not in the business. He is a big believer of systematizing and documenting processes. Dumbing things down so anyone can do them.

Although the primary thrust of his books are targeted at small business (and since I started my business from 0, I am a bit of a small business person despite running the Billion dollar company), there are some gems for larger businesses as well.

It speaks to scalability. Creating a system that can grow and does not require any specific person in order to do this. Then polishing the system at every opportunity to make it better.

What I am finding in the current polishing is that the adaptability of the people is a key trait. People tend to be the barrier to new systems. The adaptable ones will thrive. Part of what I need to do is to also moderate some of the change in order not to break a good thing. Although we need to change - we also need stability. It is that balance that I seek.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Views from a larger company CEO Blog, Feb. 4 2008
I recently re-read E-Myth and E-Myth revisited by Michael Gerber ([...] His thesis is to work on the business, not in the business. He is a big believer of systematizing and documenting processes. Dumbing things down so anyone can do them.

Although the primary thrust of his books are targeted at small business (and since I started my business from 0, I am a bit of a small business person despite running the Billion dollar company), there are some gems for larger businesses as well.

It speaks to scalability. Creating a system that can grow and does not require any specific person in order to do this. Then polishing the system at every opportunity to make it better.

What I am finding in the current polishing is that the adaptability of the people is a key trait. People tend to be the barrier to new systems. The adaptable ones will thrive. Part of what I need to do is to also moderate some of the change in order not to break a good thing. Although we need to change - we also need stability. It is that balance that I seek.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Danger In The Entrepreneurial Zone, June 2 2000
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 122,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
This book deserves 7 stars for pointing out the fallacies of how most entrepreneurs operate. The book deserves 1 star for proposing a standard that most people cannot hope to meet and then pushing to sell you consulting services. Pay attention to the former, and go light on the latter.
Gerber is correct that most entrepreneurs are limited by a comfort zone of wanting to remain in control as either strong technicians or managers, which limits the potential of the business. As soon as they exceed what they can handle, the business either fails in a break-out attempt or shrinks back to a simpler state. The new businesses that succeed the most are the ones that have a business model that is easy to replicate with ordinary people.
Where Gerber goes wrong is in suggesting that many people can develop such business models. I regularly study the top 100 CEOs in the country for stock-price growth, and few of them think they can develop a new business model. Why should someone starting up a new company be likely to do better than that? They won't. In fact, I have a friend who attempted to start a new business following Gerber's principles and almost failed before he adjusted to normal operating approaches. He spent so much time developing his business model, that he never got around to operating it.
Gerber's three favorite examples are McDonald's, Disney, and Fed Ex. Notice that two of the three got most of their ideas from someone else for the business model (Ray Kroc from the McDonald brothers in San Bernardino, California and Fred Smith from an Indian air freight operation).
I think there is another fallacy here: You can get ordinary people to do simple things (deliver packages, cook and deliver cheap hamburgers, and smile at people on automated rides). But in many businesses the demands of the market are extraordinary such as in many technological product businesses and services. Microsoft has a business model, but it is not one that Gerber would recognize.
Finally, he condemns people who want to operate their business as a job by being technically expert. Where would we be if people never did that? What if Peter Drucker spent all of his time developing business systems to make pizzas and tacos rather than writing business books about management? What if great musicians developed business models for teaching children to play the violin and piano rather than performing? In other words, there is room and a need for extraordinarily able one-person companies run by technicians.
Skip the pitch for the consulting services at the end. You'll like the book better if you do.
But don't let my quibbles keep you as an entrepreneur from failing to appreciate the excellent case Gerber makes for having a business model as soon as possible, and working systematically to improve it. If you can do that, you may well develop a true irresistible growth enterprise.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, Jan. 7 2011
By 
Iliana Lauriston "polaris" (canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
Great book, was so thorough and well written that I decided not to go into business at the end...because I realized, I did not have all the aptitudes and motivations to be a good business woman.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book for business owners or the self-employed, Jan. 5 2013
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This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
This book is a great foundation for understanding what separates the self-employed from the business owners. You can't call yourself an entrepreneur if you are not following this book. If you want to do more than just be an employee in your own business, then this is the book you need to get started.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must read for anyone looking to start a business, May 25 2012
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This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
I've read this book once and I'm going to read it another time (to write notes). I've reccomended it to several of my friends and family (I'm reordering because it's hard to get it back from them). If you want to have a business work for you and not for you to work for it, READ THIS BOOK!
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4.0 out of 5 stars galvanizing, March 5 2014
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This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
There's one central idea here that's extremely important for people running their own businesses and that is you must make the business work for YOU and to create systems that work for YOU. I am in the gardening biz and much of his philosophy does not apply, though I hear he has one for landscapers. Personalized service in aesthetic garden work cannot be systematized like MacDonald's, all the intrinsic value you offer is then lost, but the book inspired me to develop systems that worked for me and still the idea of making the business run without you is crucial because your employees depend on you to keep going. This was incredibly well timed because I spent the year trying to do this and then we had a fire at the office, and my people needed to be independent and by then they were! So really invaluable advice in this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars inspirational, March 3 2014
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This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
This book will take the business idea you have and guide you into thinking about it in a different way. WARNING it will make you want to run out there and start right away. An awesome read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars self-employed? you need that book, Oct. 31 2013
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This review is from: The E-Myth Revisited: Why Most Small Businesses Don't Work and What to Do About It (Paperback)
as a self-employed looking to build a real business, this is the book you are looking for. I strongly suggest to read that book
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