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5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarous!!! Still relevant today
Its sad that pointy haired managers still exist, but at least with this theyll be amusing and not as frustrating.
Published 4 months ago by Umar Ahmed

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3.0 out of 5 stars Decent Book, Funny at Times - From A New Dilbert Fan
This is one of the first Dilbert books I have read. I enjoyed the book but did not think it was hilarious. All the stupidity of the corporate world and managers gets boring after a while.
I basically skimmed through this book because I did not want to waste my time reading it carefully when the information here has no real use. I found The Joy of Work to be a more...
Published on Dec 12 2000 by tim747


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5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarous!!! Still relevant today, March 7 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
Its sad that pointy haired managers still exist, but at least with this theyll be amusing and not as frustrating.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, Dec 5 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
5/5, love the book. It is fairly fun and funny with all the management jokes flying around and a couple of the comics just made me laugh out loud in public. Reccomended for those who love dilbert and can get the office jokes!
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5.0 out of 5 stars So real it is scary, Sept. 21 2010
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
This book is so real that it is scary. You can tell that Scott Adams has spent time. His description of cube life is still relevant today.

I have been trying to justify the Peter Principle and could not make it fit but after reading this book all things became clear. It is impossible to keep a straight face in meetings with out seeing the different types of personalities doing their thing. I can even anticipate what they are going to say and the reactions.

Usually as most books and movies you recognize everyone but yourself. The most obnoxious person will laugh at his stereotype or just not get the point when it comes to movies and books. However this book is scary in the fact that I could see myself when Scott was describing engineers. And it took a little while to realize what he was talking about the ringing device that knows when to break your concentration.

I am going to leave a copy on QA's desk.

MY next must read is "Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook"
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5.0 out of 5 stars So real it is scary, Sept. 17 2006
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This book is so real that it is scary. You can tell that Scott Adams has spent time. His description of cube life is still relevant today.

I have been trying to justify the Peter Principle and could not make it fit but after reading this book all things became clear. It is impossible to keep a straight face in meetings with out seeing the different types of personalities doing their thing. I can even anticipate what they are going to say and the reactions.

Usually as most books and movies you recognize everyone but yourself. The most obnoxious person will laugh at his stereotype or just not get the point when it comes to movies and books. However this book is scary in the fact that I could see myself when Scott was describing engineers. And it took a little while to realize what he was talking about the ringing device that knows when to break your concentration.

I am going to leave a copy on QA's desk.

MY next must read is "Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook"
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another good Dilbert book, March 3 2004
By 
Eric Kassan (Las Vegas, NV USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
For sheer humor, the Dilbert books and strips are great. The way Scott Adams is able to illustrate the insanity of many common business practices in a few scenes or sentances is incredible. On the bright side, because there are so many stupid things being done commonly, almost everyone can relate to Dilbert. On the down side, there are so many stupid things being done commonly.
Relative to other Dilbert works, The Dilbert Principle is almost as good as Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook and considerably better than Dilbert and the Way of the Weasel.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sad & True, Dilbert embodies life of todays' office techie!, Jan. 6 2004
By 
Courtland J. Carpenter (Fort Wayne, Indiana United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
I've worked as an engineer or technician, both for big companies and small. Before Dilbert, in all but the most restrictive environments, a small office underground poked the same kind of fun at management. Some offices even have their own cartoonists. A mega-sized company in Texas had a talented, cartoon artist, who did satirical office cartoons, with great caricature likenesses. He signed his work "The Phantom", and because I think even management knew who he was, he stayed restrained enough to keep it funny, but not too insulting. One possible exception, was a cartoon that mimicked the classic road gang movie, "Cool Hand Luke". He depicted an office corridor which as management walked by each office, they would say "Still shaking that work order there, boss". It did not go over too well with management.
The Dilbert Principle is loosely based on the long discussed phenomena, called the "Peter Principle". Which I always thought means the biggest "prick" rises the highest. Usually it's the most unqualified as well. In this age we pay CEO's millions in salary, and then give them massive stock options. In return, they bankrupt the company with shady accounting practices, and sometimes, outright theft. You have to wonder if the term "business ethics" is an oxymoron. It's good that most offices have people like Dilbert, and we all have artists like Scott Adams. The humor allows many of us to survive the droll, office existence day after day. The unrewarding existence, of working in a system where incompetents profit, often on our good works.
Prior to Dilbert, I may have considered myself unique, or just unlucky to be employed by some of these bozo's in suit and tie. I've been through the improvement meetings, sensitivity, and those focus groups. The "one on one" carpet sessions with my boss, which accomplished nothing, except to try my patience, and then waste my time. Still, management needs to feel they do something, and if it can't make a new report to show their own boss this week, it may be time to try out the latest management fad. Adams collection of cartoons, groups these into common categories of management tactics. If you look hard enough, you may even find a cartoon, that help you avoid experiencing the same Hell in your own office. It's too bad the managers don't seem to read these books, or if they do, they don't seem to be telling.
Perhaps the most important thing found in The Dilbert Principle, is that it gives some of us a better understanding of what's really going on. Unless you're fairly astute, you will occasionally find yourself buying into a lot of management disinformation. Information, that could clue you into a "downsizing", a company sale, management change, or other "issues", that may give you reason to brush up the old resume. At the very least, if gives you a chance to know what's probably going on behind the scenes, and decide how to best keep your own house.
Another thing that is uncanny about Scott Adams, is his depiction of the characters. It seemed like, the company I worked for in Texas, was chock full of those little balding management guys. Middle managers with overly short wide ties, and always carrying a cup of coffee in their right hand, as they walked about. They'd ask us about what we were doing, and when we told them they'd look confused, say something cleverly non-committal, and move on. It used to be a competition to see who could confuse them first, and move them on to the next persons office or cubicle.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Dilbert for any fan!, Dec 27 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
I may just be a kid, but I am a big fan of workplace scenarios and, especially Dilbert. I read straight through this book and never failed to agree with Scott Adams's perspective of modern work life.
The only concept I did sort of disagree with was the "hoteling" method. I think that if we are to rent a "thing" that we will be using for a long portion of time, then we should keep it. I have no problem renting a movie, because I "use" it for barely a eighth of a day.
But to close my review, I agree with pretty much everything Scott Adams has to say about these common workplace situations. He is very funny when writing about these, and that it the reason you should get this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Dilbert 101, Oct. 17 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
The reason for the remarkable success of Scott Adams' Dilbert cartoon strip is obvious; he has captured the flavor of modern business and held it up to the light of truth, revealing all of its quirks, crazy strategies, and downright insanity for all to see. Dilbert is the working man's hero; while we toil away in our little cubicles, waiting for quitting time and weekends, Dilbert and his pals are fighting back - well, not fighting, but they are doing all kinds of complaining, the same complaining most office workers do, albeit not so forthrightly. The Dilbert Principle is the book that made a cult comic strip a treasury of American humor; taken outside the frames of his heralded daily comic strip, Scott Adams is even funnier and more insightful than even many a Dilbert fan would have thought possible. He's been there, and he knows what he is talking about.
In this bestselling book, Adams basically defines corporate culture; telling us many things we already know yet doing so in a fashion that is brilliantly funny. His explanation for the craziness of business today is a simple one: People are idiots, which is something I've been saying that for years. Adams includes himself among the idiot population. We all do stupid things from time to time, and those who do more stupid things than others wind up in corner offices with windows and a secretary while the majority of folks toil away in their sensory deprivation chambers (or cubicles). Adams explains the nature of this beast we call the workplace, illustrating his points with the help of over 400 Dilbert cartoons and reinforcing even the most seemingly inane assumptions he makes with actual case reports of real people who have written to him of their own experiences.
The Dilbert Principle covers almost every aspect of the workplace: management, performance reviews, marketing, business plans, budgets, sales, those awful meetings, projects, etc. He shows you how to get ahead at the expense of your co-workers, delineates the lies of management so that you can be on the lookout for them when they come, defines modern terms such as downsizing in the simple, more direct meanings of days gone by. He describes the process by which one becomes a leader, exposes team-building exercises and group projects as the useless vehicles they almost always are, and provides advice on keeping afloat in the business world by means of hoarding information, avoiding doomed projects, and surviving those you can't avoid; from there, he goes on to offer his knowledge on topics such as: how to participate in a meeting based on the things you want to get out of it, and (as if most of us even need a refresher on this) how to avoid actually working while at work.
The whole book is just brilliant, hysterical satire built on things millions of us know all too well, and one finds oneself nodding or agreeing with far too many of the silliest notions and business practices Adams rakes over the coals. The book is a fountain of knowledge, with each page containing terrific quotes along the lines of three of my favorites: 1) The best thing about the future is that it isn't here yet, 2) The great thing about the truth is that there are so many ways to avoid it without being a "liar," and 3) The only constructive criticism is the kind you do behind people's backs. If you are a Dilbert-type worker (and odds are pretty good that you are), you will find comedy and a sense of comradeship with Dilbert and his cohorts. If you really want to get ahead and assume the increased lack of intelligence needed to become a manager, though, you should pick this book up for one chapter alone: Machiavellian Methods penned by Dogbert himself.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome!, Oct. 14 2003
By 
Mark Nenadov "arm-chair reader" (Essex, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
This is the first book that I read from Scott Adams, and it got me hooked!
It is funny, realistic, and flat out entertaining.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What more can be said?, July 10 2003
By 
Carey Holzman (Glendale, AZ USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dilbert Principle The: A Cubicle's-Eye View of Bosses, Meetings, Management Fads & Other Workplace Afflictions (Paperback)
This book is one of those "It's funny because it's true!".
If you like the comedy of George Carlin or Gallagher, you'll love the comedy presented in this book. You might even think Scott Adams works at your office by the scenarios he describes and then puts them in a perspective that awakens the corporate-brainwashed employee to see the proposterousness of the current bueracracy of today's employers.
It's very enjoyable. It's an easy read. It's definately a book to share with other 'working' friends.
One of my favorites!
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