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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite books of 2010
First off, I have to say that this was definitely one of the best books I've read this year. Interesting, beautifully written, unique. Winter writes with elegant simplicity. As the blurb on the cover by author Michael Crummey says, "It's a beautiful book, brimming with heart and uncommon wisdom," and that sums it up perfectly.

Annabel is the story of a baby...
Published on Nov. 4 2010 by J. Nickel

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow...but it grows on you!
Slow to start...but the book grows on you....so stay with it. A great Eastern Canada read, so I recommend it!
Published on Dec 21 2012 by Veronica Hylands


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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite books of 2010, Nov. 4 2010
By 
J. Nickel (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
First off, I have to say that this was definitely one of the best books I've read this year. Interesting, beautifully written, unique. Winter writes with elegant simplicity. As the blurb on the cover by author Michael Crummey says, "It's a beautiful book, brimming with heart and uncommon wisdom," and that sums it up perfectly.

Annabel is the story of a baby born in 1968 in a remote village in Labrador---itself a remote region of Canada--with both male and female genitalia . A decision was made somewhat reluctantly by his mother and her best friend/midwife-- to raise the baby as male, and so his vagina was stitched shut, he was given life-long meds, and the female side of little Wayne was hidden inside himself. By the time Wayne reaches puberty though, it is clear to him that he is not like any other child, and the truth is revealed to him in bits and pieces. More than just a story of what it's like to live an intersex life, this is a story of silences and secrets, and all about identity and how we all perform our genders. Winter approaches this all with great dignity and sensitivity. If I have quibble about this book, it's just that Wayne's poor mother disappears from the book about 2/3rds of the way through. What happened to her?

I received this book back in July, but between the frosty blue cover with the deer on it and the author's name "Winter," the book just seemed too cold to read in the height of summer. Having read it now I wonder why I took so long--this is a great read any time of the year.

One more small thing: Gabriel Fauré's "Cantique de Jean Racine" is important to a three of the characters in a few spots. When it came up right near the end I was curious and so pulled it up on YouTube. Of course I recognized it right away. It's a stunning piece of music, and listening to it as I read the final pages was an enriching experience that brought tears to my eyes.

Annabel was nominated for the literary triple crown in Canada: the Roger's Writers' Trust Fiction Prize (which was recently awarded to Emma Donoghue for Room), the Governor General's Literary Award, and the Scotiabank Giller Prize.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tackling a Difficult Subject with Grace!, July 23 2010
By 
Kathryn L. MacIntosh (Kitchener,Ontario) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
Winters has written a hauntingly beautiful novel. It is beautiful in its craftsmanship. It is beautiful in its natural,rugged Labrador coastal setting of the 1960's. It is beautiful in its simplicity of characters and story. What is not so beautiful is it topic...hermaphroditism. And yet, Winters shows us that this abberation of nature is not necessarily ugly and sordid. It is not one which must be immediately surgerically corrected upon birth. Indeed her message resonates in the midwife's words "That baby is all right the way it is. There's enough room in this world." And so Wayne grows up, ostensibly,a male,receiving testosterone shots from the island hospital, while simultaneously possessing female organs and emotions. The truth is kept a huge secret.

The main characters...Wayne, himself;the midwife,Thomasina; Jacinta,the mother; and Treadwell,the father, are the only ones who know why Wayne sometimes prefers "less manly" activities. Tension builds as Jacinta understands and sympathizes with Wayne's proclivities, while Treadwell openly castigates them. Many times in the novel, the reader sympathize with Wayne's frustrations. It is only when he has left home and finally met up with Wally, a primary school friend with whom he had always felt comfortable, that he can truly relax. The setting has changed to a college in Boston, where Wally is studying music. Sitting among the other students there, Wayne suddenly realized that he finally "fit in". Finally,"he did not feel out of place because of his body's ambiguity".

While the story has been one of great angst,and while Winters may not have convinced the reader that it is best to leave nature alone, the reader at least awakens to the deep humanity of hermaphroditism. And, regardless of the amount of surgical intervention, all people are comprised of both male and female characteristics, and all combinations need to be accepted.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who Are We When Our Identity is Decided by Others?, March 16 2011
By 
Cheryl Schenk (Alberta, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
The Globe and Mail calls it "Beautiful...Absolutely riveting from the very first page." and that is a fact. Kathleen Winter is a very capable storyteller and I look forward to future works.

I love when the cover of a book intrigues me. The blurred vision of an animal confused me at first, but became a profound imagery in several ways throughout the introduction to Labrador and its inhabitants.

In this story the author weaves a tale about people and community and the challenges of youth, all of which has been complicated further by the hidden truth of a child's identity, dictated to by gender and society beliefs.

I felt tremendous sympathy for Wayne throughout, and was often angered or bewildered by the actions of the adults in his life. However, I was also touched by the depth of love and respect amongst these individuals, and moved by the sense of innocence and trust that remained at the core of Wayne's character from childhood into his adult life. As a parent, I also understand that we are often called upon to make decisions in our children's lives and that community, family traditions and upbringing play such a strong role for all of us in who we become as adults and how we make those decisions.

From the time I first heard about his story through the Giller prize shortlist, I was compelled to read it. At a young age, I remember my mother and aunts talking about a distant cousin that was born a hermaphrodite, though that word never entered the conversation. They spoke about the fact that his parents chose to raise him as a son, and that through the years that decision became a struggle for him.

I never understood, or even contemplated, what kind of struggle he would have had or the depth of physical and mental pain he may have been subjected to.

Thank you, Ms. Winter, for opening my eyes and touching my heart through Annabel.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is an excellent book., Feb. 16 2011
By 
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
The author tells a poignant story without leading the reader to judge anyone's behavior or decisions.

The "scene" is wonderfully set: 1968 rural Labrador (nearly-Northern Canada, very isolated and "rustic" living environment) where a true hermaphrodite child is born. Even today this would be a challenging and difficult moment for parents, now imagine 40 years ago in a rural hunting/fishing community.

There is no sense of judgment as to whether or not the parents made the "right" choice, or handled it the right way - they made the choice they did, knowing what they know. I can't imagine what any parent would do if they had to decide just after birth, what gender they should choose for their child.

And how would they feel about themselves if they chose wrong? When do you tell your child? At what age will he/she be old enough to understand, or to forgive your decision on their gender?

Some terrific questions explored via Wayne/Annabel as he/she grows up.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating subject, Nov. 7 2010
By 
Ketsia Lessard (Montréal, Québec, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
We rarely get to read novels about hermaphrodites and it was a courageous enterprise for Winter to discuss such an unusual subject, and one that must have required extensive research. "Annabel" challenges our ideas of what is normal; it encourages us to accept what is, underlining the pain and shame we create when we try to make people fit into stiff categories when they simply can't. Winter makes it easy for the reader to feel compassion for the young hermaphrodite, Wayne/Annabel, and we witness his/her evolution with great eagerness. The book is at times filled, however, with unnecessary details, detours and poetic envolées that distract the reader from the main story line and make it hard to follow. But we put the novel down satisfied, with smarter and wiser perspectives on life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars thought provoking, well written, Jan. 15 2012
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
This book was well written. Very thought provoking. The writer brought out the emotions of the characters well. I could relate to these emotions. Ethics to think about. I recommend this book. Be aware if you cry easily this book will make you cry
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4.0 out of 5 stars I felt that Winter got bored writing the book, Sept. 21 2014
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This review is from: Annabel (Paperback)
I felt that Winter got bored writing the book,, and hurriedly ended it. There were so many things I still wanted to know. Where was her/his mother? What was happening with her? What decision had Wayne/ Annabel made about his/ her life? Wally was singing in a choir but appeared to have own dressing room? Is this common for just a member of the choir or had she progressed with her voice to solo alto?
The episode with Treadway' s contemplating the murder of the leader of the gang who attacked Wayne and the reason he didn't seemed contrived, at best, to me.
On page 456' Wayne noticed intimate pieces of domestic life like those had touched him on his way to visit Wally Michelin. Washing lines with plaintive pulleys. ..........just a few pages before ,448. We read " clothes hung in a damp wind that made them tremulous, so that the clothes appeared intimate.. Maybe the echo was deliberate but I think not. Had not occurred before.
Maybe I'm just being picky but almost everyone in our book club what a bit dissatisfied.

What I would love to do is read (not edit as I do not presume to be on the level of a editor), before it is published , some way along in the process. FOR FREE. Just to satisfy my curiosity on how I would do.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A unique and touching story., Aug. 8 2014
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This review is from: Annabel (Kindle Edition)
Annabel was a finalist in the 2014 Canada Reads on CBC. It is the story of an intersex baby born and raised in Labrador in the late sixties. Not a topic I would normally pick up on but the author Kathleen Winter handles the topic with such sensitivity that, in the end, I didn't want the book to end! Beautifully written, and excellent book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Almost understated, yet very poignant and effective, Nov. 3 2014
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This review is from: Annabel (Paperback)
It has been a long time since I've read a book cover to cover with such speed. I was engrossed in the inner worlds of the characters, all different and special in their own way. I was captivated by the landscape and culture. And the protagonist's story was beautifully told. Winter's writing and insights are superb.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Read!, Aug. 16 2010
This review is from: Annabel (Hardcover)
I really enjoyed this book. Being a Newfoundlander it was really nice to see references to things from "home". It was really touching to feel the emotions the author provoked when protraying the inner conflict of the father, the mother and the hero/heroine of the book. The struggles each had to go thru to get on their journey of acceptance of what could only be described as a no win situation was powerful. What a thought provoking subject matter! Thanks for a beautiful book that will stay with me for a long time.
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Annabel
Annabel by Kathleen Winter (Paperback - Feb. 26 2011)
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