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4.0 out of 5 stars A day the life with a quirky spin
Goto is a Canadian author, and that fact is reflected in her work. Taking place primarily throughout the Canadian Prairies, Kappa Child follows a woman who finds herself mysteriously pregnant under less than usual circumstances. Goto's heritage as a Japanese Canadian and feminist is also featured in this book (like many of hers), which I think contributes greatly to the...
Published on July 4 2010 by A. Taylor

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars How and why has this drivel become required reading in a required freshmen English course?
No idea what previous reviewers were smoking when they read this mindless drivel. Even worse, no idea what it was doing on the freshman roster at the once-venerable University of British Columbia (UBC) English Department when there is such a wide assortment of classics truly worthy of literary scholarship.

This novel, and I use the term loosely, is a poorly...
Published 14 months ago by ASKBiblitz


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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A day the life with a quirky spin, July 4 2010
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A. Taylor (Winnipeg, MB Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Kappa Child (Paperback)
Goto is a Canadian author, and that fact is reflected in her work. Taking place primarily throughout the Canadian Prairies, Kappa Child follows a woman who finds herself mysteriously pregnant under less than usual circumstances. Goto's heritage as a Japanese Canadian and feminist is also featured in this book (like many of hers), which I think contributes greatly to the story, with themes regarding the myths of kappa, of being a pregnant single woman, and of bisexuality and lesbianism.

I found myself able to relate to the main character a great deal, because she also deals with battered self worth and struggles with her difficult upbringing. She has a lot of quirks and isn't a pretty-as-a-picture woman - she felt like a real person because of it.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars How and why has this drivel become required reading in a required freshmen English course?, Aug. 26 2013
This review is from: The Kappa Child (Paperback)
No idea what previous reviewers were smoking when they read this mindless drivel. Even worse, no idea what it was doing on the freshman roster at the once-venerable University of British Columbia (UBC) English Department when there is such a wide assortment of classics truly worthy of literary scholarship.

This novel, and I use the term loosely, is a poorly written exercise in pedantry devised to offend and injure particularly the psyche of young heterosexual men. It's a heavy-handed (knuckle-scraping) approach to the same old brave new world blame game of patriarchy as the inventor of every evil known to man and beast. It presumes that we are all as intellectually and spiritually bankrupt as the author, who seems to suggest that two people from different backgrounds are unable ever to see anything about one another beyond what makes us different, as if all communication is an aggressive imposition of ourselves lacking in curiosity or humanity. What nonsense!

Like the purveyors of leaky condos and other offal infecting contemporary culture, obscure writers in coldest Canada use the old sales ruse of conferring on themselves and one another meaningless literary awards and then manipulating them to obtain undeserved writer-in-residencies as evidence of literary skill. This author would be better suited, in my view, to the hamburger or ditch-digging trades.

What's criminal is that post-secondary English departments are now so infected by mediocrity and so divorced from authentic literary scholarship that professors no longer distinguish literature from this tripe. Students: If this selection is included on your reading list, change courses, report the instructor and move on. It's simply not worthy of either your money or your time.
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The Kappa Child
The Kappa Child by Hiromi Goto (Paperback - Oct. 1 2001)
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