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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not much new...
Like other reviewers, I agree that if you own DSM-IV (burgundy cover), there is absolutely no reason for you to purchase the DSM-IV-TR (silver cover). Might as well wait for DSM-V (won't that be a treat). If you are not a mental health professional or graduate student, I can't imagine why you would want to own this book. It is essentially a compilation of symptom and...
Published on June 2 2003 by mr_arch_stanton

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2.0 out of 5 stars This book is not current information
I ordered this book by mistake. My professor hadn't updated her syllabus. The DSM IV is no longer current The DSM 5 is the new one you need, published in May of 2013
Published 5 months ago by alternate reality


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not much new..., June 2 2003
By 
"mr_arch_stanton" (Santa Fe, New Mexico) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
Like other reviewers, I agree that if you own DSM-IV (burgundy cover), there is absolutely no reason for you to purchase the DSM-IV-TR (silver cover). Might as well wait for DSM-V (won't that be a treat). If you are not a mental health professional or graduate student, I can't imagine why you would want to own this book. It is essentially a compilation of symptom and behavior checklists that help clinicians make reliable diagnoses of mental disorders.
I would recommend strongly (for both professionals, students, and the lay public), DSM-IV Made Easy by James Morrison. Morrison's book makes the DSM come alive. He illustrates technical points well, and provides interesting case examples that make you think of people when you read the diagnosis, not just symptoms.
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2.0 out of 5 stars This book is not current information, Oct. 29 2013
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I ordered this book by mistake. My professor hadn't updated her syllabus. The DSM IV is no longer current The DSM 5 is the new one you need, published in May of 2013
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5.0 out of 5 stars DSM IV Another Good title to have, Feb. 17 2013
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
Pleased with this purchase visit bestbookdeals2012.com for other great offers.
Since the DSM-IV® was published in 1994, we’ve seen many advances in our knowledge of psychiatric illness. This Text Revision incorporates information culled from a comprehensive literature review of research about mental disorders published since DSM-IV® was completed in 1994.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's the Mainstay, Jan. 21 2004
By 
Thomas( Doc Savage 45) (St. James, MN United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
I am a psychologist and I have been practicing for about 30 years. I remember the little DSM II. It was the size of the companion small book that can be purchased. The DSM has a history. There was actually a time when psychologists and psychiatrists were considering 2 different texts. Reading the reviewers was interesting as this is my tool to differentiate what my clients present. It is continually being improved and that is the focus of TR. There are subtle differences and clarifications. This book is the basis of identifying the specifics of what we are working with. The DSM IV was a collaborative effort to acurately represent international, cultural, and biological differences. My clients don't care but some don't know that an adjustment disorder of mood is different than dysthymia or depression which is again different from Bi Polar disorder. I probably wouldn't read it if I didn't do this kind of work. Yet it may be important to people with diagnosed illness. It can assist the capable reader in being an informed consumer.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative, but don't buy it if you have the original DSM-4, Dec 23 2001
By 
Lee Markowitz (Yorktown Heights, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
The text-revised version is virtually identical to the 1994 version of the DSM-IV and not worth buying if you have the 1994 version. Along with the DSM-IV, the DSM-IV Text Revised version is, however, an informative book that provides good introductory information, especially in the "Diagnostic Features" section, about a wide variety of mental disorders. A problem of the manual, in my opinion, is its use of a categorical classification system while ignoring the dimensional nature of psychological phenomena.
Lee J. Markowitz, Department of Psychology, University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada)
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Psychiatry's pride and shame, Aug. 8 2011
By 
Mira de Vries - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
Don't laugh. This review is about the DSM. It's not a general description, as readers of MeTZelf will surely already know what the DSM is about. Nor is it a critique like those by authors such as Blom, Boyle, Caplan, Horwitz, Kutchins & Kirk, and Walker. Rather, it is an attempt to deflate some of the mystery surrounding the DSM.

For many years I refused to buy it, not wishing in any way to contribute to the APA. But, finally I relented when I wanted to check for myself whether what critics say about the DSM is true. So I went to my local bookstore in a suburb of Amsterdam, in Holland, you know, wooden shoes, tulips, windmills, etc. "Can you order the DSM for me?" I asked at the order desk. The salesman pointed to the shelf behind me and said, "We have it in stock." "In stock? Is there that much demand for it, that you keep it in stock?" "Yes," said the clerk, "mainly psychologists and psychotherapists are in here asking for it all the time."

Of course the book on the shelf was a Dutch translation. Mark Twain warned us tongue in cheek, "Be careful of reading health books; you may die of a misprint." Fearing I may likewise go crazy from a mistranslation, I asked the salesman to order the original version, emphasizing that I want it in American English, not British. The result was that I had to wait three months for it to arrive. I paid 68.61 euros for it, including tax. This was back in 2003. It may be more expensive by now due to inflation, or perhaps cheaper due to the weak position of the dollar to the euro.

My first impression of the book was its size. Wow, is it ever big. It's 9.9" (25.1cm) high, 6.9" (17.5cm) wide, and a full 1.8" (4.6cm) thick according to my double-edged ruler. It contains 943 pages, not counting the unnumbered blank pages in the back. I wouldn't claim that it's actually a small book, but there's not as much text in it as the first impression suggests. The letters are surprisingly large and the lines widely spaced. This is normal for books that are written to be read straight through, like novels, but for medical manuals this is quite unusual. I took several off the shelf and compared them, to make sure I wasn't imagining this, but the other manuals all have much smaller print. In fact, the first book I took off the shelf that has slightly larger letters than the DSM was Alice in Wonderland. However, the DSM's cover is prettier, a shiny gray that looks almost like silver. The cover design shows a lot of restraint: no picture or anything.

The title page mentions only the name of the book, not a writer or editor. On the back of it is the usual gobbledygook about the copyright, being printed on acid-free paper, Library of Congress cataloguing, etc. Then comes a surprise: a dedication page. Again, I checked all of the other medical manuals on my shelf, and not one of them has a dedication. The dedication is "To Melvin Sabshin, a man for all seasons." Melvin Sabshin was director of the APA for nearly a quarter of a century, and retired shortly before publication of this edition of the DSM.

Next comes the table of contents, written in letters that your optometrist might use to check your eyesight from across the room. After that is a list of names called "Task Force on DSM-IV". This goes on for only seven pages, as opposed to appendices J and K in the back of the book, listing the names of the contributors, advisers, etc. which go on for 27 pages. Yet more names appear in the acknowledgements. By now I'm beginning to suspect that people paid or were paid to have their name appear in the DSM.

Next come 13 pages of introduction, which is normal for the type of book that the DSM pretends to be. But after that comes another surprise: a disclaimer. In essence it says that there may be disorders that the book left out, and that "...mental disorders may not be wholly relevant to legal judgments..." Then come twelve pages of instructions on how to use the manual.

Skipping over 733 pages which form the body of the DSM, we arrive at Appendix A, decision trees, which look a lot like the ones on my tax forms. The Dutch Tax Service's motto is: "We can't make it more fun, but we can make it easier." (They don't.)

Appendix B is "Criteria Sets and Axes Provided for Further Study." That goes on for sixty pages. It seems to me that rather than study axes, they should use them to chop off big parts of the book.

Appendix C is a ten-page glossary. Appendix D is 15 pages of discussion on the changes made in this edition. Appendix E lists all the diagnoses in alphabetical order, and appendix F lists them in numerical order, leaving one wondering in just what order they are listed in the body of the work.

Appendices G and H provide the codes in the ICD, a rival publication by the WHO (World Health Organization). It's no secret that the DSM writers specifically aimed to have their list of diagnoses correspond with the ICD, in fact, they say so. They only don't add that the discrepancies in previous publications were embarrassing.

Appendix I is about "culture-bound syndromes." If you are a man (women don't get it) from Papua New Guinea, a perceived insult could provoke you to become sick with a disorder called amok. Indian men (only, I assume, though here it doesn't specifically say so) might go crazy from a discharge of semen. This mental disorder is called dhat. American Indians can get ghost sickness. Eskimos get pibloktoq, which includes tearing off clothes, eating feces, and fleeing from protective shelters. The Chinese get another apparently male only disorder, shenkui, caused by excessive semen loss from frequent intercourse or masturbation. Central and Latin Americans are subject to susto, which is when the soul leaves the body. Zar, which occurs in parts of Africa and Asia, is possession by spirits. Although recognized by the DSM as a mental disorder, the local population do not consider it pathological. But then they don't have the benefit of science like the APA does...

I've already mentioned appendices J and K. After that comes the index, and at the end, eleven blank pages.

Along with the DSM, I received an advertisement for 16 other APA publications. One of them is, believe it or not, a book called Infant and Toddler Mental Health, Models of Clinical Intervention With Infants and Their Families, edited by J. Martin Maldonado-Durán, M.D. The accompanying blurb reads: "Written by clinicians who work with infants and children and their families every day, this eminently practical guide illustrates what to do in numerous clinical situations, and addresses the most common and important problems in infant psychopathology."

Heaven help the babies of this world. Heaven guard us all from psychiatry.

Copyright © MeTZelf
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not the simple, useful nosology you're looking for., Aug. 29 2001
By 
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
I quote Karl Menninger, on the publication of the DSM-II in 1968:
"This year [1968] the APA took a great step backward when it abandoned the principles used in the simple useful nosology [DSM-I]. In the interest of uniformity, in the interest of having some kind of international code of designation for different kinds of human troubles, in the interest of statistics and computers, the American medical scientists were asked to repudiate some of the advances they had made in conceptualization and in the designation of mental illness."
Since then, it's gotten worse, not better, with thousands of symptom checklists and numbered diagnoses, conveniently correlated to the ICD-9 standard diagnosis codes for easier billing.
But people, medical students and physicians included, will insist on treating DSM-IV as a textbook in psychiatry. It's nothing of the sort - it never touches on the essential topics of etiology, prognosis, and treatment. People memorize the checklists and think they understand psychiatry, when in fact they have entirely failed to grasp the noble and great endeavor: riddling out the first causes and mechanisms of our humanity, and how those mechanisms go awry.
Well, then, you say, what about diagnosis? Isn't this a diagnostic manual?
In my opinion, for that purpose DSM-IV is worse than useless to a lay person. Consider the previous reviewer who thought the book made a good party game, diagnosing his healthy friends with all sorts of 'disorders'. It wouldn't take much experience in a psychiatric emergency room to realize that psychiatric illness is no party game - but it would take some. Without the context provided by direct, caring relationships with the mentally ill, the jargon and symptoms discussed in this book are meaningless. This book will not teach you to be a psychiatric diagnostician! Only experience can do that. It's intended as a quick reference guide for people with that experience, and a reference concerned with very practical matters not relevant to the patient-physician relationship (such as the standardized conduct and reporting of clinical trials, or how to justify billled services).
I'd disagree strongly with the prior reviewer who felt psychiatric patients should read their DSM-IV. If you're a psychiatric patient "on the same page" as your health care practictioner, get off the page and get on top of your life! You have more pressing concerns than making yourself into an expert psychiatric diagnostician and quibbling over the learned APA's compilation of symptom checklists - you need to heal.
In short, I can't imagine recommending this tome to anyone for any purpose - people who need it don't need me to tell them so.
If you're interested, however, in psychiatry, I urge you to read the classics - Freud for the grounding of psychodynamics, Skinner on behaviorism, Menninger's superb "Man Against Himself" on suicide and depression, Erich Fromm's "Escape From Freedom" and "Man For Himself" for academic psychophilosophy, Kraepelin on dementia praecox (what we now call 'schizophrenia' - I prefer his original term), Wundt on introspective self-analysis, Kraft-Ebbing's "Psychopathia Sexualis" for a laugh and for a serious understanding of the social construction of sexual "disorder" - if you're really interested in these topics, you'll find these authors far more stimulating, I guarantee!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars If you've got the '94 edition, you're fine..., June 19 2002
By 
J. Polsgrove "tucson_deadhead" (Uh, Arizona) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
As a mental health clinician, I made the mistake of buying this the Text Revision of the DSM-IV on the assumption that there were some extensive changes. Don't bother. If you have the 1994 version, you're fine. This 2000 update doesn't change all that much, unless you are very, very, very picky. I'd wait around for DSM-V. (Heck, I know folks who are still swearing my DSM-III). The cost of this book for a few minor changes simply isn't justified.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great writing reference, March 12 2002
By 
C. Lenz "chalrie" (St. Paul, MN USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
I'm not a psychologist, psychiatrist or even a counselor. Yes this book is huge. Yes this book is dry but so is a dictionary. As a writer I can tell you this is an amazing reference book for creating detailed descriptions of characters. When I create a character that has a specific symptom or disorder I can look it up in the book at get a very detailed description of specific conditions. This book helps me get into the mind of my characters and see them as more complete people. This is a must have for writers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must have for clinicians, Feb. 8 2002
By 
Chester (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, , Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR(tm)) (Paperback)
The DSM does not detail etiology or treatments. That is not its purpose. It does allow clinicians to use similar vocabulary and diagnostic criteria when discussing specific mental illnesses.
When I talk to another psychiatrist and say someone has schizophrenia, it helps to know we are talking about a presentation that, although it may be unique, fits general diagnostic criteria. Maybe not all of the criteria, but generally so.
I do not recommend this book to patients.
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