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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Controversy is what's really interesting.
Remember Gary Larsen's "Far Side" cartoon of the scientists dropping everything and running outside when the Good Humor truck comes by? We tend to think of scientists as beyond reproach - but they're not. They're just as emotional and jumpy as the rest of us, especially when their pet doctrines get called into question.
In Science the drill is to glom...
Published on March 23 2002 by Bruce Boatner

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource; dry reading but worth the effort
I almost gave up on reading this book, but I'm glad I didn't. Part I was definitely dry reading except for the Sheguiandah, Canada section which was interesting enough to make me forget about the writing style. Part II of the book was much easier to read. Bits of humor did make it through the writing style (grown men throwing elephant dung at one another; goldminers...
Published on Aug. 5 1999 by Joyce L. Paski


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Controversy is what's really interesting., March 23 2002
By 
Bruce Boatner (Eagle, Idaho USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
Remember Gary Larsen's "Far Side" cartoon of the scientists dropping everything and running outside when the Good Humor truck comes by? We tend to think of scientists as beyond reproach - but they're not. They're just as emotional and jumpy as the rest of us, especially when their pet doctrines get called into question.
In Science the drill is to glom onto the accepted belief system and hang on for dear life. God forbid some punky upstart like Fritjof Capra should come along and write a smart-alecky book about how Vedic texts described the same tenets as Quantum Physics a coupla thousand years ago. Or Rupert Sheldrake would have the nerve to point out that the DNA emperor has not clothes. Howls of derision. Calls for book burning in the journal "Science". Yellink und screamink.
Now I don't think it takes 900+ pages to make a point. Probably 150 would have been adequate to get everybody's bowels in an uproar. The 2-cassette audio abridgement seems to do a pretty good job. As far as the actual validity of the overall argument - who knows? The evidence proposed is probably just as valid as the official party line.
It is important to remember that all scientific revolutions go through pretty much the same drill: Scorn and derision towards those presenting novel or contrary opinions, followed by fear, panic and banishment of those individuals when it begins to appear that empirical data is supporting the new theories, then total abandonment of previously cherished notions, accompanied by jumping on the bandwagon with abandon while announcing that they'd been supporting the new idea all along.
So it's really the process that's important here. Hey, sit back and enjoy the show!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource; dry reading but worth the effort, Aug. 5 1999
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This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
I almost gave up on reading this book, but I'm glad I didn't. Part I was definitely dry reading except for the Sheguiandah, Canada section which was interesting enough to make me forget about the writing style. Part II of the book was much easier to read. Bits of humor did make it through the writing style (grown men throwing elephant dung at one another; goldminers and artifacts in poker games; erstwhile poets!?!). The appendices and bibliography are very informative. Chapters 9 and 10 (Peking Man and Cryptozoology) made the purchase of the book worth while for me. I found one error (p.320, l.6 at the end of the line - "there" should be "their"). On the whole, I give the book 3 stars and recommend it. A tremendous undertaking, well done. My commendations to the authors.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Best resource for anomalous paleoanthropology- a must have!, Nov. 10 1998
This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
I was impressed by the thoroughness of the documentation and resource material. It is essential to good science that all of the data and background facts be available for all to evaluate. On the contrary, very few anthropology courses even suggest that this material exists. The point that the authors have well presented is that hominid paleoarcheology is one of the most subjective and "educated-guess-filled" realms of science, based on precious, relatively scarce, "hard" evidence. It is good science to continually question the favored theories; and, in general, the book is successful in its correct attempt to insert the selectively forgotten data of the history of mankind into the record for objective consideration. Any truly scientific mind should appreciate it as such.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars My bias doesn't match the authors but..., June 13 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
I can't as easily dismiss the facts presented in this book as some negative reviewers. The book, though scholarly size, leaves holes unexplained. I don't come to the same conclusions as the authors regarding the age of humankind. Though my religious views differ greatly it is hard to dismiss the fact that something is fishy with the Evolution religion as we know it. This book is thought provoking at least and certainly provides a detailed if not factual arguement. Great fodder for coffee break debates at the office ;-)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars very conservative, Sept. 17 1998
This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
I think that every archeology undergrad should find this of benefit. But don't expect Eric Von Danican. It will be slow going for most of you. But I do appreciate what the author is saying, and it's very, very valid. I even got some cartoon ideas out of it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, Jan. 16 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
Makes you stop and think about our distant past. And what we know and don't know about the origion of man
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19 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Book in the Realm of Pseudoscience, May 12 2003
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This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
Wade Tarzia published an extensive review of this book in _Creation/Evolution_ 34:13-25, 1994 (National Center for Science Education), also available on-line at "Doug's Archaeology Pages" website. Here are some key extracts from that review:
---------------------------------------------------------------
...Despite all this hard work, I think the book falls short of a scientific work primarily (but not entirely) because (1) its arguments abandon the testing of simpler hypothesis before the more complex and sensationalistic ones, and (2) the use of so many outdated sources is inadequate for a book that seeks to overturn the well-established paradigm of human evolution -- scholars must not work in isolation, especially today, when multi-disciplinary approaches are needed to remain on the cutting edge of knowledge. However, for researchers studying the growth, folklore, and rhetoric of pseudo-science, the book is useful as 'field' data. ... Forbidden Archaeology [is also] ... a well-written example of pseudoscience -- its looks like the real thing, a phenomena discussed in Williams (1991, 15) [ _Fantastic Archaeology_; see also K. Feder's _Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries_ ] ...
Mass of Details -- The mass of details with attached analyses would require book-length responses from specialized reviewers to confirm or critique. This style is a common diversionary tactic in pseudoscience. Since the authors have not aired their arguments previously through professional journals, as many scholars do before writing such a huge synthesis of material, the task of validation becomes a career itself. Such a style burdens an analysis with long leaps between broad assumptions (i.e., scientific cover-up) to the detailed evidence (i.e., minutiae of strata and dating from obscure sites) -- all on the same page. ...
Use of Old Sources -- Quotations of the 19th-/early 20th- century material are copious -- comprising, I would guess, at least 25 percent of the book. ... I do not indict the sincerity and ground-breaking of 19th century scholars. However, because knowledge seems to accumulate and research techniques seem to improve, assuming a blanket equivalency of research level between 19th and 20th century science is just going too far.
Rusting Occam's Razor -- A major flaw of Forbidden Archaeology is its quick leaps toward sensational hypotheses (see in general Williams 1991, 11-27). Sensational ideas are not intrinsically bad -- plate tectonics was pretty astonishing at one point (Williams 1991, 132), but also true. However, the cautious investigator hopes that less sensational, or simpler, hypotheses are first proposed and well tested before more complex or less likely explanations are considered. ...
Missed Evidence -- While presenting a voluminous amount of detail, sometimes Forbidden Archaeology has missed important points. For example, the book discusses the Timlin site in New York, where researchers reported finds of ancient eolithic tools dated to 70,000 YBP (p. 354). Yet Forbidden Archaeology does not mention the responses to these claims by several professionals, which casts the nature of these finds in doubt (Cole and Godfrey 1977; Cole, Funk, Godfrey, and Starna 1978; Funk 1977, Starna 1977; a reply to the criticisms is in Raemsch 1978). I found it interesting that a student created similar "eoliths" by rattling the same source material in a garbage can (Funk 1977, 543); the simple experiment has much to say about eoliths! ...
Acceptance of Poor Evidence -- ... Similarly, when the book documents a claim for a modern-type human skeleton (reported in a geology journal of 1862) in a coal deposit 90 feet deep, we learn the authors wrote the Geological Survey to date the coal to about 286 million years (p. 454). But we are not treated to a contextual discussion of the bones -- how they were found, who found them, what was the site like, and how these allegedly 286 million year old bones came out of the earth with only a loose black coating that was easily scraped away to reveal nice white bone, etc. The impression left is that, if a tabloid reported Jimmy Hoffa's corpse was found in Triassic deposits, then the authors would no doubt perform rigorous research to date those deposits and then include the data in their next book. ...
Faulty View of Science Process -- One of the most striking themes of Forbidden Archaeology is the notion that scientists are slaves to tradition, which slows down or stops the adoption of new ideas. Yet, scientists have often overturned paradigms in the face of a social tradition that penalized them for it. Galileo pushed his 'wild' views of a heliocentric solar system until threatened by state-officiated torture. Modern cosmology is another example, a branch of knowledge under such motion and revision that I suspect astronomers are giants among coffee drinkers. Similarly, paleoarchaeology is revised often in the face of new evidence (see Tuttle 1988 for a feel for the controversy). The "knowledge filter" would have to be impossibly acrobatic to span all this change. ...
Conclusion -- ...This book, and other creationist texts that use similar techniques, is most useful as ethnographic data in studies of comparative religion, cult movements, popular movements, anti-science, fantastic archaeology, rhetoric, folklore -- the book can be studied in any of these fields. With its emphasis on "secrets" and "hidden history" and "cover-up," the book participates in the popular genre of the conspiracy, akin to popular beliefs about the Kennedy assassination and crashed alien spaceships kept in guarded Air Force hangars ... I see Forbidden Archaeology fantasizing about a past open-mindedness to legitimize a vast restructuring of our present understanding -- without good evidence.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Alternative Scenario for Human Origins, Dec 29 2003
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This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
During a 1989 sabbatical leave from Niagara University, I investigated philosophical problems arising from the interface of evolution theory and religious revelation, especially respecting the historicity of human first parents as depicted in Genesis. The 1993 publication of "Forbidden Archeology" brought my attention to concerns about the manner in which the scientific community treats anomalous evidence of earlier than Late Pleistocene anatomically modern human beings. This, combined with a few apparently well-documented examples of anomalous finds, such as Reck's skeleton, the Castenedolo skeletons, and the Laetoli footprints -- plus a plethora of lesser known and sometimes less well-documented cases -- led me to the conclusion that there exists probable cause to have rational doubt about the current theory of human evolution.
Chapter fourteen of my own "Origin of the Human Species," (Sapientia Press: 2003) discusses at length "Forbidden Archeology's" contention that anatomically modern humans predated hominids from which evolutionary theory claims we descended. My book demonstrates that sound natural science is entirely compatible with an authentic reading of Genesis, including Adam and Eve's reality -- and this, without recourse to young-Earth creationism. While my thesis need not rely upon "Forbidden Archeology's" claims, still, I considered its carefully documented analysis of the paleoanthropological record sufficiently credible to devote an entire chapter to analysis of its claims. I am grateful to Michael A. Cremo for his comments and suggestions during the writing of this chapter, which I include as a possible alternative scenario for human origins - one still consistent with belief in a single pair of historical first parents for the human race.
We must recall that even a single instance of an anatomically modern human being prior to the Late Pleistocene period would be catastrophic to the current human evolution theory. The telling admission made in a review by the "Social Studies of Science" (26:1 (1996): 207) that "much of the historical material that they (Cremo and Thompson) resurrect has not been scrutinized in such detail before" should forewarn critics to beware of a priori dismissal of "Forbidden Archeology's" claims concerning the early presence of true humans in the fossil record. "Forbidden Archeology" explains how practical epistemological limitations place paleoanthropology in a category far removed from experimental science conceived as easily verifiable in a laboratory and universally replicable. These epistemological limitations, combined with Cremo and Thompson's extensive documentation of what appears to be anomalous evidence of true man living earlier than the Late Pleistocene period, renders credible the contention that, even in the early years of the 21st Century, educated persons can have rational doubts about the standard human evolution scenario. Indeed, the entire process of human origins might prove to be much more mysterious than atheistic Darwinians suppose. "Forbidden Archeology" deserves careful consideration in any serious discussion of evolution and human origins.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating evidence that questions modern scientific theory, July 11 2002
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This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
This book is a compilation of scientific discoveries that have been shuffled off into a closet or ignored because they call into question modern scientific theory even though some were for a time accepted by the scientific establishment. From human footprints and skeletons estimated to be millions of years old to evidence of human habitation far older than science is willing to admit, the authors gather these and many more bits of evidence that demolish accepted evolutionary theory. The book's only drawback is its length and sometimes dry explanation of discoveries and why they are valid. In fact, the reader can sometimes be forgiven for thinking he/she is reading a textbook on archeology. However, this weakness is also a strength in that the reader will see that the discoveries listed aren't included willy-nilly but rather have strong reason to be considered as valid scientific evidence. Indeed, the authors allow noted scientists who were connected to the time when the discoveries were made to do the explaining which makes the book all the more stronger. The book also raises the disturbing question (a question asked by Charles Hoy Fort decades earlier) about the scientific community really being willing to entertain all evidence, even that which conflicts will dearly held theory.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Forbidden Archaeology or just wishful thinking?, Feb. 28 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition (Hardcover)
Anyone interested in the origins of humankind and the physical evidence of the past should avoid this book until they have a firm grasp of the philosophy and methodologies of science. The 'evidence' presented invariabley lacks suitable provenance and would not be admitted in any law court since it takes the form of heresay or conjecture. Virtually all of the data presented fails the following tests, as required by science: 1) are the 'sites' real? That is, are there no alternative explanations for these patterns? 2) are the artifacts definitely the result of human manufacture or are they 'geofacts' or 'ecofacts' ... materials which nature sporadically produces which appear to resemble intentional human manufacture and/or use? 3) is the evidence reliably dated? Can the dates be independently verified and tested? 4) where was the information originally published? Unfortunately, unless data can be independently verified and tested science cannot accept it. If all four of the above criteria can be independently verified through scientific inquiry, then the hypothesis (the working explanation or the data) can be accepted. Unfortunately, the evidence presented in this book fails most of the above tests and must be rejected. I would avoid this book since it is 'anti-scientific' in its approach ... regardless of the position taken by the authors. A hint ... check the authors' credentials. Stanley A. Copp
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Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition
Forbidden Archeology: The Full Unabridged Edition by Richard L. Thompson (Hardcover - Dec 15 1998)
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