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90 of 97 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read, with a few minor problems
America Alone is a wonderful book. One that should be widely read. There are a number of points made in the book that are quite important and unique.

1. Demographics

Mark Steyn doesn't believe demographics can explain everything. But he thinks it can explain a good 90%, and he makes a pretty strong case for it.

The facts are that the...
Published on Oct. 21 2006 by Vecheslav Silagadze

versus
12 of 43 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Horrendous claptrap
A ridiculous book. A hodgepodge of barely coherent sentences adding up to a Manichean screed that can be summed up as follows: "America is great. Everyone else is stupid." Steyn is particularly ludicrous in his criticism of Robert Fisk (one of the most highly decorated journalists in the world) whom he describes as being "almost always wrong." Of course, no details are...
Published on Oct. 27 2008 by Skeptic Critic


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90 of 97 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read, with a few minor problems, Oct. 21 2006
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This review is from: America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It (Hardcover)
America Alone is a wonderful book. One that should be widely read. There are a number of points made in the book that are quite important and unique.

1. Demographics

Mark Steyn doesn't believe demographics can explain everything. But he thinks it can explain a good 90%, and he makes a pretty strong case for it.

The facts are that the birthrates in most of the western world are well below replacement rates, while the birthrates in most of the Middle East are well above. This fact, coupled with increasing rates if immigration to the west from parts of the world where the general population is quite antithetical to western values (freedom, democracy etc.) will inevitably lead to confrontation.

2. Cultural confidence

In the west, multiculturalism is law. Literally. It is the sacred cow of the elite that no one dares question. Well, except perhaps Mark Steyn and a few others.

The basic point made in America Alone is that in a clash of cultures where one is self confident and aggressive while the other is self-abasing and passive, odds are on the former. Regardless of what technological and economic advantages the latter may have.

These are very strong points. One may certainly disagree with them (as I do, in many ways) but one can't argue that they are not worth discussing, and this book is a great addition to the debate.

That being said, there are also a few things about the book I found quite irritating.

1. Content

It seems as though the majority of the book was taken verbatim from Steyn's old columns. If you have been a close reader of his work in the last few years, you will find almost no new content here, and certainly no new ideas. Everything that Steyn says in this book, he has already said (many times) in his columns.

2. Repetition

It's the demographics. Russia has a 1.1 fertility rate. America has 2.1. It's the demographics. Russia is dying. America has a chance. Russia has a 1.1 fertility rate. It's the demographics. America has a 2.1 fertility rate.

We get it!!!

Some statistics are quite literally repeated a dozen times throughout the book. It becomes almost unbearable at times, when you're reading the same point being made ad nauseum.

3. Rigor

If you're going to play statistician, at least make a serious go at it. Many of the statistics cited in this book are plucked out at random and never explored beyond the superficial level. I'm not saying it's necessary to spend 50 pages on analysis, but if you're making a serious claim like the notion that no culture has ever recovered from a fertility rate below 1.3 children per woman, you might want to spend more than two sentences talking about it. How about addressing some of the more common objections, and exploring why this is the case?

In any case, the above are fairly minor objections, in comparison to all that is good about this book. Overall this book was a great read and is highly recommended.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mark Steyn simply rocks, May 21 2008
I bought this book after Macleans magazine was brought before the Ontario Human Rights Commission. I would therefore like to thank the litigants for introducing me to Mark Steyn.

The book is often criticized as being anti-Islamic. I came away with the impression that it is a critique of the "West" and it's weak-kneed response to some of the more unacceptable practices that some immigrants bring with them and try to implement in Western countries.

Before you dismiss this book as the ravings of a "flagrantly islamophobic" "Right Wing Blowhard," know this: there are many immigrants and/or Muslims who agree with him.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An apocalyptic vision to which attention must be paid, Jan. 27 2008
By 
J. Wayne Eyre (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It (Hardcover)
To state first things first: America Alone has got to be the most important book published in a generation.
It sets forth--through compelling argument and exhaustive detail--a chilling scenario of an inexorable, Islamist supplanting of the Western world (save, perhaps, of America alone) by a demographic and ideological tsunami that will lead to "a long Arabian Night" comparable to the Dark Ages.
Despite its singular excellence and its importance to the Western world, America Alone apparently has been under-reviewed in the media. Well, the West ignores the message of this book at its grievous peril--which very likely is precisely what it's doing, given the incredible degree to which the Islamic imams are being accommodated and appeased these days, in Europe especially.
Whether Steyn proves to be the voice who finally wakes the soft, self-indulgent West from its slumber or a modern-day Cassandra whom few pay attention to remains to be seen. (But anyone with any familiarity with contemporary Euro-think already knows what the favoured response will be.)
Mark Steyn ought to be given some sort of Nobel Prize. But, again, so deep is the blinding, jealousy-born hatred of the United States in Europe that such an idea would be risible Over There. As many have pointed out, Steyn somehow manages to lay down his apocalyptic vision with hilarious word play and ribaldry, but his vision is apocalyptic nevertheless and attention must be paid.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The REAL "tipping point", May 14 2007
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Number 6 (Ajax, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It (Hardcover)
Mr. Steyn has a way of using humour to slice through the fog created by the self-annointed guides of civilization. His well-researched commentary shows trends that will, even if not precicely as Mr. Steyn suggests, loom largely in the next generation or two. Long after carbon credits become the next "pet rock" of the history books, the demographic picture illuminated by Mr. Steyn may indeed become the conventional wisdom. Mr. Steyn suggests that if the Western culture stems the tide of its own self-hatred, the demographic "tipping point" may yet be avoided. I'm not sure I see a case for optimism.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars America is facing a life-and-death struggle., Dec 25 2007
This review is from: America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It (Hardcover)
In Mark Steyn's new book: America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It, he argues that there will soon be a conflict between the U.S. and the rest of the world. European and Islamic anti-Americanism, Mark Steyn says, threatens to leave us isolated in the world: the global situation is rapidly reaching a point at which America will have to confront the enemies of civilization without help from anyone else. And when the world is divided between America and the rest, all those who don't want to see the world plunge into a new Dark Age should pray that America wins. Mark Steyn provides a well-thought out argument to just how bad things are likely to get, and what we must do now to ensure that our children and live in freedom. Mark presents a great deal of insight, below are a few:
* The likely outcome of today's global situation, in which Islam is militarily weak but ideologically confident -- while the West is militarily strong but ideologically insecure,
* The correlation between the structural weaknesses of the social-democratic state and the rise of a globalized Islam.
* How the terrorist attacks in Madrid in 2004 and London in 2005 - along with other events such as the murder of Theo van Gogh -- were the opening shots of a European civil war.
* The little-noticed reason why America's European allies failed to grasp the significance of September 11.
* How oil isn't the principal Saudi export, Islamic jihad ideology is -- and our oil money bankrolls its spread.
* Why it is so important for Americans and others who want their families to enjoy the blessings of life in a free society to understand that the life we've led since 1945 in the Western world is very rare in human history.
Much of the Westernized world will not survive the twenty-first century, and much of it will effectively disappear within our lifetimes--including most European countries. In Mark Steyn's America Alone: The End of the World as We Know It, he shows how this process is already advanced, and explains that whether we like the New Order in Europe and the world depends on whether America can summon the will to shape at least part of the emerging global picture. If not, well ...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Factual, Excellent, Eloquent and Convincing, Sept. 6 2008
A great book that deal with the threat of Islamofascism, demographic decline of the western world and moral problems of the western societies. A highly recommended book for the westerners to finally wake up to the facts and take the correct path. America Alone is the best political book of the year 2006.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mark Steyn is not alone, Nov. 12 2008
By 
D Glover (northern bc, canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It (Hardcover)
Mark Steyn has done the world a favour and called a spade a spade. Radical (or consistent) Islam as a world-and-life view is a threat to life and liberty for the lazy and lethargic west and we need to engage in this war of worldviews. If this book doesn't open your eyes to the self induced death culture of the west and the giant on the door step waiting to fill the vacuum then you probably don't have any eyes. And if you still aren't convinced that this book is worth your time and effort, the fact that various ultra-liberal, extreme-politically correct, let's-all-hold-hands-and-hug-each-other human rights commissions in Canada have entertained charges against the opinions expressed between its covers (you know, wacky and far-fetched stuff like radical Islam wants to see the eradication or subjection of all who disagree with them) ought to tell you something of the merits of this volume.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easily One of the Best Books of the Decade, Dec 19 2007
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This review is from: America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It (Hardcover)
It's rare that something this good comes along. This book has garnered a lot of reviews so I won't get into details as to why my opinion largely mirrors that of the Books in Canada reviewer. If you think the world has bigger problems than global warming then this book is for you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Islam Versus the West, Nov. 24 2014
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America Alone is about the probability that America will soon be a lone force against militant Islam. Israel does not figure in because the book is about Western powers, not Middle-Eastern. America Alone is about the attempted ‘reprimitivisation’ of the world by Islam and why America is poised to be the only Western power left in a position for resisting it (xi.) Given the widespread apathy and denial in the West, it is unlikely that the people who need to read a book like this will get around to it in time. An obsession with American Idol is not commensurate with a will to prevail (pp. 175, 176.) Too many of us want to enjoy freedom without having to fight for it (p. xxii.) Steyn’s imaginative style, however, has probably helped to make his book attractive to many readers who otherwise would not have touched it. Saddam Hussein’s followers are called ‘Saddamites’ (p. 156.) An erudite obstructionist is nicknamed ‘Monsieur Sophisticate’ (p. 115.) A turncoat who was once a ‘Great Thinker’ is termed a ‘great gasbag’ (p. 48.) Islam as a ‘religion of peace’ is an ‘implausible mantra’; Islamic Wahhabism is a ‘religion of pieces’ (p. 79.) This fresh way of expression makes the subjects of demography, socialism, and multiculturalism go down like happy pills instead of like spoonfuls of cod liver oil. Couple the inventive vocabulary with occasional bouts of sarcasm and extended metaphor, and you have charming composition. Some books on current events will stress you out by their staleness. This one puts you in a relaxing mood so you can be taught. Imaginative prose is a great draw—magnetic enough to draw some deniers in who would rather ignore, if they can, the truth that they don’t want, and need, to hear.

Mark Steyn reminds us of when citizens began to voice their concerns about immigrants taking their cities over (p. xvii.) I remember some of those conversations back in the ‘70’s. Now, in Britain, such takeovers are a present day reality. In some towns, Muslims maintain their dominance by intimidation, and, if necessary, even by assault and street violence. Tony Blair calls the changing demographic a ‘subterranean conversation’ (p. xviii.) Even a well known ‘multiculturalist ideologue,’ then, admits that a takeover is underway. Before this book was updated in 2008, Oxford was already being asked to welcome Islam’s call to prayer over loudspeakers from the domes (p. xv.) Maybe that is happening by now. I am afraid to check. The Muslim push has been on for a long time, and is getting more brazen. On 9/11, many years ago now, Muslim youth rampaged through northern England in celebration of the terror strikes (p. 46.) Because Islam is a religion, not an ethnic group, it is a global network (p. 62.) Its ideology is bankrolled by Saudi oil (p. 69) and its people are not open to ‘pluralism.’ The rule in Islam is ‘subjugation.’ Even the ‘moderates’ admit that (p. 78.) Islamic law has been on the ascent for decades in many nations (p. 202.) It is being taught in some American high schools. The material includes ‘the superiority of jihad’ and a ‘Judgment Day’ during which the Muslims will slay the Jews (p. 72.) That does not seem like ‘moderate’ teaching. When you map out the various peoples that the Muslims are terrorizing, you will get the impression that Islam has set itself against the rest of the world (p. xxxiii.) Since this book was written, even China has had to deal with its rebellions and massacres. Who’s next? North Korea? When that happens, nobody dare say that this fight with Islam is not a world war.

We are dealing with a religion whose adherents welcome death with a readiness that should make us fret (p. xxxviii.) It is an incoming culture that is populated mostly by youth (p. xxxii), that steers clear of books and learning (p. 16), that, religiously, is into ‘political motivation’ more than ‘spiritual contemplation’ (p. 100), and that does not share with us a philosophy of common humanity. For example, it is inconceivable that Muslims would suspend fighting at Christmastime, as German and British soldiers did in 1914 during trench warfare (p. 143.) We have seen the proof of this as recently as 2014 when Palestinians broke cease-fire after cease-fire against the Israelis. We are dealing with a primitive, inhumane mindset. In some ways, today’s Muslims are even more inhumane than they were in the days of Muhammad. ‘The ‘jilbab’ (head to toe covering for women) might not predate the disco era (p. 74.) If sixty percent of Muslim Brits want sharia to be imposed in Britain (p. 76), it is not wrong to not qualify the word ‘Muslim’ in all that has been said in this paragraph. A man owning and operating a cell phone can believe that shaking the hand of an infidel will cause his penis to disappear (p. 140.) This anecdote (the substantiation of which I have from ultra Muslim-accepting CBC Radio hosts) encapsulates what we are dealing with: the scary combination of crude beliefs and modern adaptability. Understandably, CBC left out of that conversation the fact that those who believed in the urban legend were Muslim.

Britain’s influence over the world has a lot to do with having been the first nation to ‘conquer infant mortality’ rates (p. 6.) While Western peoples have nearly quit reproducing, Muslims are repopulating themselves wherever they live or go (pp. 2, 10, 40, 53.) Rising generations in the West are, or will be, largely Muslim, and Muslims are at odds with the ways and freedoms of traditional Westerners (p. xlii.) It is the tradition among Muslims to extract tax money from their infidel neighbors whenever they can (pp. 83, 164, 165.) Until they can do it by an imposed jizya, they will do it by populating the welfare ranks. Is it reasonable to count on Muslim immigrants, then, to pay for all of those welfare programs that Western offspring will be too few in number to subsidize by themselves? (pp. 43, 114, 115, 189.) Large numbers of immigrants end up being beneficiaries of welfare, not contributors (p. 190)—this, in addition to all the ‘junkies’ on ‘state narcotics’ that we already support (p. 47.) There seems to be coming a perfect storm: Western welfare systems collapsing in the midst of a rising immigrant population that is balky, if not downright militant.

What happens in Europe is something to watch and learn from. Troubles over there eventually find their way over here. Brussels, the EU capital, has a caucus that is mostly Muslim (p. xii.) The Archbishop of Canterbury is open to accepting sharia in the United Kingdom as an alternative law (p. xiv.) Headscarves or even ‘full abaya’ uniforms (again, the head to toe coverings for women) are common sights now in some of the most liberal cities in the world: Amsterdam, Marseilles, Vienna, and Stockholm (p. 21.) In Paris a gay mayor was nearly stabbed to death by an anti-gay Muslim (p. 179.) In Spain, shortly following the infamous train bombings, no less, the traumatized Spaniards voted in a party committed to appease, rather than oppose, the terrorists responsible for the carnage (pp. 36.) That was nothing less than jihad toppling a European government (p. 37.) Can an apologetic attitude toward terrorists be the right approach? The will for war is diminishing all over the West. The so-called ‘exit strategy’ that politicians debate is a good definition of this weak will (p. 169.) Though the USA has more resolve against Muslim fanaticism than democracies abroad, its resolve is on the decline too. The foolish accommodations that are made to whining Muslims are revealing of this weakness. In California, the Crusaders agreed to rename their football club. But Muslim teams called the Intifada and Sword of Allah did not have to return courtesy (p. 158.) Muslims are being appeased practically every time I turn on the news or crack open a pundit’s book. Each example underlines our unwillingness to stare down oppression. Each instance of oppression by the moderates is a sign of solidarity with the fanatics. We cave in to the demands of moderates. We issue subpoenas instead of death warrants to jihadists (p. 161.) Appeasement of Muslims is just part of the Western spirit of accommodation that has grown out of our politically correct culture. The derangement is unbelievably strange: emasculating a lion on a coat of arms to satisfy female soldiers in Sweden (p. xxiii); replacing the traditional designations ‘father’ and ‘mother’ on birth certificates in Spain (p. 10); selling toilets with alarms that go off when their seats are raised in order to feminize men in Germany (p. 180.) Sensitivity indoctrination is geared mostly in favor of Muslims, though: getting rid of ice cream cones in Burger Kings across Britain because the swirls on the lids look like the word ‘Allah’ in Arabic (p. xlvi); removing Jews and Hindus from a Muslim’s jury trial in London (p. 38); making students in California practice the Muslim faith to promote awareness (p. 66); granting a Muslim inmate special meats for his feast-days in Boston (p. 82); advising police officers in Brussels to hide their coffees during Ramadan (p. 123); suspending the flying of England’s flag in prisons because the crusading emblem on it might offend Muslim jailbirds (p. 197.) The reason for Muslim favoritism is the fear of, not respect for, the Muslim faith. It is a disturbing, dangerous trend to give in to ‘resurgent Islam.’ The trend is more worthy of worry than global warming (p. xxvi.) “That’s how great nations die—not by war or conquest, but bit by bit, until one day you wake up and you don’t need to sign a formal instrument of surrender because you did it piecemeal for the last ten years” (p. 197.)

Accommodation, political correctness, appeasement—these are nearly synonymous terms; their practice issues from the multicultural ethic. America Alone, if it is anything—and it is many things—is a primer on multicultural madness. When a nation waters down its national identity in order to be inoffensive and polite to immigrants, the immigrants will retain their ‘cultural loyalty’ and undervalue their new ‘nominal citizenship’ (p. xvi, xxxv.) Or (which outcome could be worse), “multiculturalism makes a nation no more than a holding pen” (p. 202.) There you are in your new holding pen where no values and identity are held up for you to cling to and be dignified by. You get to squawk about whatever you do not like and the state will be sensitive to your every complaint. A society that is ‘sensitive to the insensitive’ and ‘tolerant of the intolerant’ will be taken advantage of (p. 158.) Agreeing to wear gloves before you hand the Muslim detainee his Koran is to agree that you are the unclean infidel that he claims you are and it ‘validates his bigotry’ (p. xliv.) A host country should not assimilate with the immigrant, but vice versa (p. 74.) Multicultural sensitivity toward the Muslim is the way to sharia (xlvi.) In a multicultural society, ‘laws and customs’ bow ‘before the gods of boundless multicultural tolerance’ (p. 134.) In short, multiculturalism acts like so: “Decapitate us, and our politicians rush to the nearest mosque to declare that ‘Islam is a religion of peace’” (p. 200.) The last chapter is the part of the book that covers the multicultural topic most densely. I doubt that this subject is covered with more acumen by another author.

It is hard enough to fathom that a person, even one raised in ignorance and indoctrinated to love death, would want to remain a Muslim. It is harder by far to understand why someone would want to become one. Many persons are converting to Islam and even to the most savage of its cabals. Much needed information on why is supplied here by Steyn. The worldview that promotes the fallacy that all cultures are equally acceptable has no identity to offer (xxi, 90.) If the choice comes down to being a confident Muslim or a cringing European, the former option will have a wide appeal (p. 90.) Some ‘Western females’ convert because they find feminism, the popular status quo for women, ‘degrading and unworthy’ of womanhood (p. 94.) As for converts who go all the way into Islamism, or bloody persecution, they join because their new identity comes with a license to ‘lie, cheat, steal, rape, kill’ and because to them, that is all cool and hip (pp. 67, 120, 203.) A sense of purpose and belonging, together with an invitation to swagger among thugs—that, for a certain kind of lad, is better and more glamorous than being a nobody who believes in nothing for certain.

“It’s at the intersection of these statistics—religious, demographic, terrorist—that a dark future awaits” (p. 65.) In other words, what can be done with Islam? What can be done with the ideology itself? The reformation of Islam is the only resolution, says Mark Steyn, which is only for Muslims to do (p. 205.) We may facilitate reform by not funding mosques anymore (p. 206) and by supporting the subjects of potential dissent within Islam: Islam’s unhappy, persecuted female population (p. 205.) But Steyn, at this late point, is no longer cognizant of what he wondered about way back on page 82. What if jihadism is the reform? And what about his opinion on page 86 that Muslims who are deemed ‘moderate’ are probably just ‘quiescent,’ which polls and observations indicate is true? Moderates are dormant members of Islamic orthodoxy; as such, they favor a return to the rough and rude religion of old more than they let on. There may be some moderate Muslims or some Muslims who want to be moderate, but there is ‘no moderate Islam’ (p. 88.) To reform Islam from what it fundamentally is, every mosque would have to be overthrown and every Koran would have to be altered. Well, nearly every church has been overthrown by higher criticism and nearly every King James Bible has been replaced by a weaker version; so this kind of reform may be possible, after all. It might take more than a century to achieve this, however; jihad is coming on too thick and fast for that.

It is secularism that has left a gaping hole in the soul that Islamism is on the spot to fill (p. 101.) It is this spiritual death that preceded the demographic decline (p. 111.) Muslims are here to offset our low birth rate. Islam is here to fill the spiritual vacuum. Churches, by and large, will not criticize Islam, much less preach, even when Muslims terrorize (p. 96.) Churches that get noticed for no other reason than their take on homosexuality have become irrelevant impotent (pp. 98, 99.) “Pre-modern Islam beats post-modern Christianity” (p. 100.) That is an accurate evaluation. Churches and Christians do not stand for anything anymore. There is much for a Muslim or a seeker to hate about America and the West, especially the lewd lifestyles that are proudly practiced and put on display (p. xxxix) and which the pastors of churches, incidentally, no longer censure. Our takeaway from all of this is that the visible Church and the Western world have become repulsive enough that even Islam, with its cruelty of Sharia Law and its many persecuting arms, is a religion that Muslims are willing to keep and that lost people will seriously consider when it comes time for them to belong. A reformation of the evangelical Church would occasion revival and sweep followers of Allah into the arms of Christ. This is what we need for the present evil tide to shift. There are no signs of Church reform on the horizon, though. Until there are, this reformation called ‘jihadism’ will have to be fought with natural resources, to a great extent. Converts to Christianity are few these days. The stories of multitudes of Muslims ‘coming to faith’ always come from distant places, and these ‘revivals’ never check out as genuine when one researches them. We can continue to believe that Muslim terrorists kill because of the plight of the poor among their ranks and tribes and that we must help to get the message out that they need more social services (p. 210.) But that is not their message, even if they say that it is. Their message is the next head they sever (p. 151.)

This book, or another like it, is a necessary one to read. Good radio programs transmit what we need to know about our changing moral and political landscape. But sometimes we should go through a detailed survey that explains these things in a systematic way. America Alone is not flawless. The name of God is carelessly thrown around a couple of times (pp. 154, 184.) There is one incomprehensible sentence (p. 134.) Despising is said to be worse than hating, which makes little sense (p. 197.) Steyn says that Muslim fertility rates will be in decline by 2050 (p. 19) and that “much of the planet will be uninhabited long before it’s uninhabitable” (p. 7.) How can he know such things? There are two instances of insensitivity too. It is insensitive to speak of a woman as one who ‘croaked’ (p. 113) and of 9/11 as the “unfortunate business with the planes and buildings and so forth” (p. 4.) Pundits, to be sassy, often end up trivializing tragedy. This is one reason I do not read their books much. Here is another. Pundits, even the social conservative ones like Steyn, slip into the use of unclean connotations and vocabulary (pp. 35, 142, 168.) America Alone, though, is too important, too insightful, still too relevant eight years after its publication to not highly recommend. Much of what is written in it is coming true. Many more informed guesses will shortly come to pass. Because of our weak will and denial of reality, Islamism will ‘destroy one day…on an epic scale’ (p. 152.) The chance we have of stopping that from happening depends on whether we believe it or not.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some valid points...some problems, Oct. 11 2009
Steyn's book hammers home the points that A. Islamic values are NOT compatible with Western, liberal-democratic, pluralistic society, B. thanks to mass immigration and culturally-high Islamic birthrates, Western societies are being Islamicized, and C. the multi-culti policies of the post-WW II era are enabling Islamicization. He DOES have that right. However, there are a few very serious issues with both this book and some of Steyn's assumptions.

First of all, there is the typical conservative silence over Ronald Reagan's role in creating the Mujaheddin-cum-Taliban, as well as how the Bushes' successful efforts to extirpate Ba'athism from Iraq helped Salafism spread. Secondly, Steyn buys into the myth that welfare-state societies like Canada 'need' immigration, both to maintain population levels and fund social programs. With the introduction of the Grewal (Conservative) and Dhalla (Liberal) Old Age Security bills, the actuarial façade of mass immigration--that we 'need' mass immigration, to keep social programs solvent--finally fell off. As well, Canadian birthrates actually ARE above replacement. The only sectors relying on mass immigration are the real estate, construction and banking industries, which need constant population growth to maintain the housing bubble. Part of the problem as well is Steyn's head-in-the-sand denial of overpopulation, and food and water shortages as a real issue.

Steyn fetishizes the American 'free market' system, without noticing just how 'socialist', bureaucratized and union-ridden parts of it are. From porkbarrel space spending, to America's massive Medicaid and Medicare expenditures, there is a lot of 'welfare' (corporate and individual) in the U.S.A. Studies have shown that America's fragmented defense services waste about 40% of the defense budget on overhead and duplication. Steyn's home state, New Hamshire, still has government-run liquor stores. Also, there is no such thing as 'free-market' medicine, when medical care is run by closed-shop medical associations. Like so many people to the left of him, Steyn is also overly enamoured of local government. The problems with FEMA were nothing compared to the staggering incompetence and corruption of New Orleans' civic government, during the Katrina disaster.

Finally, Steyn is surprisingly dovish, when it comes to suggesting how to fight Salafi Islam. Maybe this is just lingering guilt over conservative support for Islamists, during the Russo-Afghan war (go look at a few Bill Buckley articles from the era, to see what I mean). However, Salafi terrorists DID murder 3,000 people on 9/11. Even more than the Thugee cult in India and Aum Shinrikyo, Salafism is a very serious threat. If we intend to win the 'war on terror' (now, under Obama, no longer a politically-correct term), there can be no half measures.
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America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It
America Alone: The End of the World As We Know It by Mark Steyn (Hardcover - Oct. 16 2006)
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