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5.0 out of 5 stars A must-have reference for any serious martial artist.
As a 28 year practictioner of Old Yang style taijiquan, I found many "secret" techiniques contained in this text regarding pressure point attacks. George Dillman has spent over 30 years researching the acupuncture points necessary to end a fight, and in this, his first book, I think he's done a commendable job. I would recommend the serious martial artist buy...
Published on Feb. 21 2000 by Taiji 218

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3.0 out of 5 stars Kyusho-Jitsu: Dillman Method Pressure Point Fighting
I have attended seminars by Dillman master instructors in the past and the book is a good reference to those training seminars. The author has done an exceptional amount of research and training, some of which is presented in this book. This subject of pressure point fighting is exteremly difficult to learn without the guidance of a competent instructor or training...
Published on Aug. 28 2001 by Anthony Cataldo


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1.0 out of 5 stars kyushu -jitsu The Dillman Method to Pressure Pooint Fighting, April 28 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
In Mr. Dillman's ctiticism of standard kata applications, he is missing the fact that these applications are those presented to beginners. One would have to study one karate style for many years to begin to uncover the many possible applications ( most of which do not involve pressure points). The more realistic applications ( still not involving pressure points) cannot morally or realistically ( or perhaps legally) be presented in books that any untrained person can buy - or in public classes where student turnover is great and only a minority will go beyond shodan. Being a sandan instructor of shotokan who has studied this one style for 21 years, I must say that Mr. Dillman's presentation of traditional kata bunkai would rival that of only a beginner or one who has only a surface understanding ofhis style's kata. While he claims that traditional kata bunkai is unrealistic, I found many of his own applications as presented in the book to be amusing. For example, Mr. Dillman, when his lapel is grabbed, doesn't consider that a real attacker isn't going to just stand there. In the real world, a grab and a punch will be almost simultaneous, often coming unexpectedly and with such speed and power that a defender searching for pressure points will easily have his lights punched out. Mr. Dillman also refers to catching a punch - something else that's pretty unrealistic in the real world.
Studying pressure points with regards to any martial art is an intersting sideline, but not a replacement for traditional training. If you want the most realistic applications, it's better to keep training than to buy this book. It will take a long time and great effort on your own part, but it's worth it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Kyusho-Jitsu: Dillman Method Pressure Point Fighting, Aug. 28 2001
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
I have attended seminars by Dillman master instructors in the past and the book is a good reference to those training seminars. The author has done an exceptional amount of research and training, some of which is presented in this book. This subject of pressure point fighting is exteremly difficult to learn without the guidance of a competent instructor or training partner. The book serves as a guide to those already studying the martial arts; it is not for the novice or the self taught individual. That said, pressure point fighting as it is called is not the end all for self defense tactics. Pressure point techniques do serve a good purpose in ones arsenal of self defense tactics, but they are designed to supplement ones total fighting system. And as it has been said before, it is difficult to strike an exact pressure point during active hand to hand combat. Pressure point control holds and escape techniques play a more active role in ones self defense arsenal. So if you have experience in the martial arts or CQB this book will serve to support some of your training, with the use of a competent partner or instructor. Novices or individuals looking for the quick fix (which there are none) try another book.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Pressure Point Fighting, May 16 2000
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This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
Commentary on Pressure Points and their uses in the martial arts. This book included sections on applications and techniques. It also includes limited narrative on selected pressure points (19 total). For example, in the section on the points, the authors have included five anatomical drawings of the human body. These charts are intended to illustrate the Traditional Chinese Medicine energy pathways throughout the body, which pressure point strikes access. Unfortunatly, the illustrations are lacking in detail, and are somewhat confusing. They have used solid black lines to represent the pathways, and have included multiple channels on each illustration. In the areas where two or more lines may intersect, there is no distinction between the lines. As such, some readers will quickly become lost.
The selected point descriptions are very limited in detail and information, covering 16 "Basic points" and three "advanced" points. Using the Chinese descriptive codes, the points covered are L-5, L-6, L-8, H-2, H-3, H-6, LI-7, L-10, L-13, L-7, TW-3, TW-11, TW-12, TW-17, SI-6, SI-7, S-5, S-9 and M-UE-28. The point striking information given the reader is very limited. For example, on page 64, the martial application for Heart Three (H-3) simply lists the martial uses as "[this point] may be struck or firmly pressed to bend the elbow." This is concerning, since a sufficient strike to H-3 can also be very dangerous (and potentially fatal). If hit stright in, a sufficient strike to H-3 can severely injure a person by stopping the beating of the heart. The immediate signs of this trauma shock to the body are an ashen gray complexion to the skin. The reciprient of the strike will collapse into unconsciousness, since their circulatory system has effectively been shut down. With sufficient force and intent, this same strike can also be fatal. These additional uses of the points in fighting are not covered, and their riskes are not covered.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must-have reference for any serious martial artist., Feb. 21 2000
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Taiji 218 (The Frozen North) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
As a 28 year practictioner of Old Yang style taijiquan, I found many "secret" techiniques contained in this text regarding pressure point attacks. George Dillman has spent over 30 years researching the acupuncture points necessary to end a fight, and in this, his first book, I think he's done a commendable job. I would recommend the serious martial artist buy this and also his second book. I would also recommend purchasing some of his commercial videotapes, either from his school or off of ebay when they become available. The one reviewer who complained that the book did not contain healing techniques should purchase Dillman video #5 which focuses on just that. Essentially, to heal you braodly strike the pressure point you just attacked sharply with one knuckle, using your fingers or the flat of your hand, striking the attacked point in the direction of its natural energy flow (in an attack you go against the energy flow of the meridian). If you don't know the direction of flow, you generally massage the point. If you don't do anything to heal a pressure point strike, the person usually recovers on his or her own in twenty minutes to a half hour. If you knocked them out, they'll usually wake up shortly on their own even if you do nothing to revive them (unless they're on drugs, especially vulnerable to the type of strike you administered, or you hit 4 or more points at once. Then they need revival (but you probably shouldn't have hit 4 or more points to begin with). That's generally it on how to heal a pressure point strike. I still recommend you buy the healing video for the fine points. Any serious martial artist of whatever style should seriously consider buying Dillman's books and videos. Hitting a pressure point and numbing an arm or achieving an electrical (vs. a mechanical) knockout is more humane than breaking a leg, an arm, busting up some teeth or leaving a black eye-- not to mention the whole issue of legal liability! Pressure point fighting is clearly something more people can benefit from learning.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must have book for every martial artist!, May 26 1996
By A Customer
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
I have been in the martial arts world for over half of my life. Over the years I have acumulated quite
a collection of martial arts books. However, most of them simply seem to rehash the same old thing over
and over again. That's why I was thrilled to see George Dillman's first book finally published! Mr.
Dillman has redefined martial arts in the United States and the rest of the world. Why? Because all
he did was teach people the traditional techniques that everyone else was afraid to reveal.

In this, his first book, Mr. Dillman gives a basic overview of the history and fighting theories of
authentic Okinawan karate, including once secret pressure point techniques. Furthermore, Mr. Dillman
describes how these pressure point techniques are found hidden in deceptivly simple looking movements of
karate kata or any techniques from all martial art systems. A must for any serious martial artist
regardless of style!

Henry McCann
Fulbright Researcher, Okinawa, Japan
3rd dan Isshinryu Karate
3rd dan Shorin (Kobayashi) ryu
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5.0 out of 5 stars You've got to come to a seminar, July 16 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
A) the book is excellent. This is a great intro into the world of preassure points, but seeing Dillman in person helps to cement in the things talked about. Also, the seminars go way beyond what's written. The book will not do you much good if you do not go to one of the seminars-----at least once, if not more often than that. I've only been to 2 of his seminars and have felt some of the knockouts. Some of the info presented in the book dovetailed nicely with things I've learned from instructors.
B) People who don't believe that you can "catch a fist" in a real fight or do any of the more amazing-sounding things (including, dare I say it, actually wound a person by kicking above the waist----high-kicking, for the record, is not a part of Dillman's systems) have not seen or experienced enough. It'll work. I've actually caught fists with my hands before I knew it was supposedly a kenpo technique.
Bottom line: buy the book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good book for learning the moves behind the katas., Sept. 23 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
I did enjoy reading this book for Mr. Dillman's theories on what many of the moves that we've all been using in our katas really mean. This is a good primer for learning more about the damage that touch strikes can do.
The one thing that I found disappointing in this work was the lack of information on using for healing, and the lack of information on undoing the damage that can be done with these strikes. These books accomplish exactly what the masters were hoping to hide from the masses by putting the damage before the healing.
Use at your own risk.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Some basics, but not a whole lot to use, Jan. 16 2001
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
I purchased this book a few years ago, and I was disappointed for the most part. It does give a little insight into some pressure points, but not much real application or specific angles at which the pressure points should be struck. If you want some suggestions on some very excellent videos and books on very useful self-defense with pressure points, email me at toelio@aol.com
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1.0 out of 5 stars Many pictures, poor info, April 18 2000
By 
PandaDojo (Moscow, Russia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
I am studying martial art and this book did not teach me anything new. I did not said how to apply them or how to find them properly. If I will be just standing there and pressing the point, the guy can simply punch my in a nose or eye and he did not had to spend money and time learning the "special pressure point". So save your money and time!
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2.0 out of 5 stars Publicity stuntman... Go flashy GI go.., March 7 2000
This review is from: Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting (Paperback)
Lots of cheesy publicity photo's in front of book. Not very responsible when it comes to demonstrating revival points.
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Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting
Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting by Chris Thomas (Paperback - Jan. 1 1992)
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