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11
2.8 out of 5 stars
Kyusho-Jitsu: The Dillman Method of Pressure Point Fighting
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Showing 1-3 of 3 reviews(1 star)show all reviews
on April 28, 2004
In Mr. Dillman's ctiticism of standard kata applications, he is missing the fact that these applications are those presented to beginners. One would have to study one karate style for many years to begin to uncover the many possible applications ( most of which do not involve pressure points). The more realistic applications ( still not involving pressure points) cannot morally or realistically ( or perhaps legally) be presented in books that any untrained person can buy - or in public classes where student turnover is great and only a minority will go beyond shodan. Being a sandan instructor of shotokan who has studied this one style for 21 years, I must say that Mr. Dillman's presentation of traditional kata bunkai would rival that of only a beginner or one who has only a surface understanding ofhis style's kata. While he claims that traditional kata bunkai is unrealistic, I found many of his own applications as presented in the book to be amusing. For example, Mr. Dillman, when his lapel is grabbed, doesn't consider that a real attacker isn't going to just stand there. In the real world, a grab and a punch will be almost simultaneous, often coming unexpectedly and with such speed and power that a defender searching for pressure points will easily have his lights punched out. Mr. Dillman also refers to catching a punch - something else that's pretty unrealistic in the real world.
Studying pressure points with regards to any martial art is an intersting sideline, but not a replacement for traditional training. If you want the most realistic applications, it's better to keep training than to buy this book. It will take a long time and great effort on your own part, but it's worth it.
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on January 16, 2001
I purchased this book a few years ago, and I was disappointed for the most part. It does give a little insight into some pressure points, but not much real application or specific angles at which the pressure points should be struck. If you want some suggestions on some very excellent videos and books on very useful self-defense with pressure points, email me at toelio@aol.com
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on April 18, 2000
I am studying martial art and this book did not teach me anything new. I did not said how to apply them or how to find them properly. If I will be just standing there and pressing the point, the guy can simply punch my in a nose or eye and he did not had to spend money and time learning the "special pressure point". So save your money and time!
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