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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scientific Support for Traditional Diets. Wonderful
This book by Sally Fallon (with Mary Enig, Ph.D.) is an inspiring polemic against both commercial, prepared food trends and some governmental and research leaders who appear to be making recommendations on nutrition under the influence of commercial interests.
My first impression of the book is that it shows exactly how hard nutritional science actually is. The...
Published on Feb. 27 2004 by B. Marold

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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Second thoughts on this book
I reviewed this book earlier and gave it 5 stars. I still believe the book has some good information, but I have to say that in practice, much of the food (dairy and grains) doesn't work for me.
I think this book way overemphasies the importance of dairy. I'm allergic to all forms myself but even in its raw form, very few peoples have traditionally consumed raw milk...
Published on Feb. 19 2003 by Benner


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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scientific Support for Traditional Diets. Wonderful, Feb. 27 2004
By 
B. Marold "Bruce W. Marold" (Bethlehem, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
This book by Sally Fallon (with Mary Enig, Ph.D.) is an inspiring polemic against both commercial, prepared food trends and some governmental and research leaders who appear to be making recommendations on nutrition under the influence of commercial interests.
My first impression of the book is that it shows exactly how hard nutritional science actually is. The authors are citing hundreds of technical works from both demographic and controlled experiment studies regarding thousands of different food components in their way to painting a complete picture of good nutrition. Their starting point in painting this picture is the common sense assumption that historical, natural diets are invariably more healthy than those laden with commercially processed foods. This assumption is backed up by demographic research done in the first third of the last century. This is the import of the 'traditions' in the title.
It turns out that the potential allies of the authors' approach come from such different quarters as the Atkins diet advocates who endorse eating meat, eggs, and other proteins in preference to (processed) carbohydrates and the 'Raw Food' wing of the vegetarian / vegan movement. The latter camp would wholeheartedly endorse the authors' issues with eating foods that retain their original enzymes to aid in digestion. I'm sure the vegans and the Atkins camp will not join forces any time soon, but their appearance in the same metaphorical room on the side of the authors' position is another indication of how multi-sided complex scientific theories can become.
I have no facts to confirm or challenge the authors' claim of corruption on the part of some academics in endorsing a nutritional position to back commercial interests. I will only say that it is irrelevant to the central tenant of the book, which in very simple terms is 'Eat the way your great grandparents ate'. Some of the more important details are:
1. Avoid processed fats, starches, sugars, and proteins. They are not of no value. They are unhealthy.
2. Eat animal protein and their accompanying fats.
3. Eat whole grain products.
4. Eat foods prepared in such a way that avoids loosing important nutrients.
Almost all of the authors' statements on individual nutritional facts are backed up by published scientific research. One or two or even ten percent of their references may be flawed, but the overall weight of their evidence is truly impressive. The only problem I find in their characterization of the way things are today is in not giving full credit to medical science in lengthening our lifespans through the suppression of infectious diseases. This is likely to be the reason behind the increase in the frequency of deaths by degenerative diseases like cancer and heart disease, not a catastrophic loss of nutritional value in our diets. That is not to say their claims about the drop in the quality of our diet are not true. Always remember that these gals are making a case, they are not simply publishing scientific results.
While I think the authors have a strong case against processed foods, I find it difficult to fully endorse their next step. Their solution takes us close to the land of food extremists such as both traditional vegetarians and the more radical proponents of 'raw' diets. What this means is that they raise up foods which are hard to find or difficult to prepare or are prepared in ways unfamiliar to American kitchens. This may not necessarily be a bad thing. It tends to appeal to my 'Whole Earth Catalog' mentality of the home-brew lifestyle. But this lifestyle is simply not practical for the millions who work long, stressful hours followed by time devoted to kids and spouses.
My skepticism regarding their solutions is reinforced by some culinary misstatements such as the suggestion to refrigerate tomatoes after they ripen, to not add garlic to hot fat, and that artisinal breads are not good for sandwiches. The second and third statements are refuted daily by traditional Italian cooking practice. Their condemnation of all aluminum cookware and the microwave also seem more extreme than they need be.
What I take from this work is the very cautious and undramatic conclusion that the safest (and most interesting) culinary path lies in the study and emulation of historical diets. This gives a strong theoretical underpinning to my admiration of educators such as Mario Batali and Paula Wolfert who examine and promote historical cuisines based on the 'what grows together, goes together'. This could easily be a subtitle of this book. It also gives support to practitioners such as Rachael Ray who promote fast cooking without resorting to overly processed ingredients.
I love a book that pulls together and validates a wide range of (my) opinions. While this book may not always be right, it is supremely valuable in its provocation to thinking. It is also supremely valuable in it's demonstrating the value of some less common foods such as sauerkraut, crème fraiche, and kim chee. This value doubles in that it actually tells you how to make this stuff. Lest it be overlooked, it is important to note that the lions share of the book is a fairly large cookbook of recipes with methods and materials that follow the book's doctrines.
At a list price of $25, the catalogue of vegetables chapter alone is almost worth the price of admission. I'm happy that here, the authors part company with both the advocates of 'raw' and the old Adele Davis doctrine of saving veggie cooking water. They reinforce again the conventional wisdom of old school culinary practice which rarely leaves veggies raw. Some raw vegetables contain some bad things and cooking almost always makes the good things more available to digestion.
I recommend this book to everyone as the very next book you need to buy about food.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a great book......, Dec 29 2002
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
The title of Sally Fallon's book, NOURISHING TRADITIONS, is a bit of a pun because her book nourishes both the body and the soul. Fallon has assembled a huge amount of material about food and life as lived in traditional societies in the past and all over the globe. The result is a wonderful compendium on "outlaw" food preparation. Fallon suggests many "diet doctors" have made big mistakes regarding food-especially food from traditional sources. Their first mistake is that they rely on the USDA and FDA guidelines which are woefully inadequate since they are subject to corporate interests and they ignore information from non-U.S. sources. The second big mistake the diet gurus (some of them medical doctors) make is that they fail to inform about how you can determine the REAL nutritional value of foods. Counting carbohydrate and fat calories is not enough. You need to understand how the food was grown and processed, i.e. bad things happen on some farms (especially those run by large agribusinesses).
Many of Fallon's suggestions are accepted across the nutritional spectrum (banish refined sugar, flour, etc.), and some of her ideas have been accepted into the main stream in the past few years (value of Omega-3 fats), but most of her ideas are ignored although they are very sound. Fallon supports the notion that food growing and preparation in the old days was pretty good, i.e. traditional food preparation using organic foods is a healthy way to live. Many of the ailments modern folks suffer are brought about because of BAD food. Folks who practice traditional diets using organic foods are generally healthier.
Organic yogurt, ghee, free range chicken, miso, cod liver oil, honey, etc. are all associated with good health and long life. Unfortunately, simply buying "good" food in a supermarket is not enough. For example, you can buy honey, but unless you eat raw honey without pesticide and herbicide ingredients, you are wasting your time and money. Non-organic yogurt filled with sugar and other material has little or no nutrient value. Milk collected from abnormal cows and homogenized and ultra pasturized contains no healthful organisms, including the bacteria in the pus "modern" cows secret.
Perhaps the worst thing those on a weight-loss diet can hear is that many of the so-called "low-fat" and other lo-cal foods may actually cause you to gain weight. Some of the chemicals in convenience foods actually inhibit the thyroid. I received this book as a Christmas gift, but if I didn't already own it, I'd buy it.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Read & Cookbook, May 18 2002
By 
Stephen Byrnes (Honolulu, HI United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
This book is much more than a cookbook--it is a nutritional handbook and virtual encyclopedia of food history and food facts. The first 80 pages of the book concern themselves with nutrition basics. The sections on fats, proteins, and carbohydrates are accurate, well-referenced, and needed in today's fat-phobic world. Fallon and Enig (who is a well-known lipid biochemist) dispel the many myths about saturated fats and animal foods.
Recipes for every imaginable dish and drink are given, from appetizers and sauces to fermented fruits/vegetables and beverages. And it was SO nice to see a chapter on preparing wild game and organ meats--nutritious foods that have virtually disappeared from our modern diets (to our decided detriment). The substantial section on vegetables provides detailed nutritional info on each entry, as well as 2-3 tasty recipes.
One caveat: some of the recipes take a lot of work if you want to do them the way Fallon and Enig recommend. For example, they suggest soaking and then drying and grinding your own grains to make flour. Obviously, not everyone has time to do this. I wish there was more emphasis on alternatives for busy people such as myself. Nevertheless, there are still lots of simpler recipes to make and they are tasty and delicious.
The Resources section in the back is excellent and handy for people wanting to get started.
A word to the detractors below:
(1) Indians DO have very high rates of coronary artery disease, even the vegetarian ones, so vegetarianism is NOT a protection against this condition (J Indian Med Assoc 2000 Nov;98(11):694-5, 697-702).
(2) The claims that vegetarians live longer than omnivores (on a healthy diet) are also not supported by available data (R Smith and E Pinckney. Diet, Blood Cholesterol, and Coronary Heart Disease: A Critical Review of the Literature--vol. 2. (Vector Enterprises; CA)., 1991).
(3) The idea that eating animal protein causes calcium loss has been disproven many times over ((a) J Nutr, 1986, 116:316-319; (b) Amer J Clin Nutr, 1983, 924-929; c) J Nutr, 1988, 118(6):657-60; (d) Amer J Clin Nutr, 1999, 69:1:147-52; (e) J Bone & Min Res, 2000, 15:2504-2512; (f) Calcif Tiss Int, 1996, 58:320-5.
(4) The idea that eating a lot of butter or ghee (or other animal fats) contributes to or causes heart disease is false ( Lancet, 1994, 344:1195; (b) Science 2001 Mar 30 291:5513 2536-45).
(5) The idea that eating meat or animal fats contributes or causes various cancers is a popular idea that is not supported by available evidence (The Lancet, 1999, 353:686-7; (b) Aust J Nutr Diet, 1997, 54(4):S1-S44.
I'm wondering if these acrid reviewers bothered to read the book or check its many references.
Also, a few reviewers commented feeling sick after eating some of the recipes. This is usually indicative of digestive weakness and may call for digestive enzymes or fermented foods before a meal to stimulate digestive juice flow. The book does suggest eating some fermented food either right before or with with a meal to facilitate digestion. Again, I'm wondering if the critics have bothered to read the book in any detail. Nausea shortly after eating can also mean that the meal has too much fat in it. Either the people made the recipe wrong or they cannot tolerate higher amounts of fats at one time and need to cut back.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended, BUT With One Caveat, Feb. 15 2003
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
Nourishing Traditions is marketed as a cookbook, but the first 80 pages of this book contain a comprehensive debunking of many nutritional myths that have become annoyingly pervasive. Even if you never use a single recipe from the book, these first 80 pages, and the numerous information snippets that feature on virtually every page of the recipe section of the book, are worth their weight in gold, and more than justify the purchase price. Sally Fallon and Mary Enig have done an excellent job of emphasizing how nutrient-depleted, additive-laden processed foods, and not saturated fat, protein or cholesterol, are the true dietary villains.
There is however, one caveat I would issue to readers of this book. Fallon is an enthusiastic advocate of raw milk, citing the destruction of enzymes that occur during milk pasteurization. I totally agree that we should eat a significant portion of our food raw, but the frequent detection of Salmonella, Brucella, Escheria Coli, Corynebacteria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Listeria, Mycobacteria, Campylobacter and Yersinia in raw milk samples should convince all but the most foolhardy to look elsewhere for raw sources of food enzymes.
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51 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning achievement; THE essential food guide/bible, June 24 2004
By 
Niel Rishoi (Livonia, MI USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
Let's face it - our foods have changed. And not for the better. In the long span of history, the last 100 years has wrought some devastating transformations in how food is handled, prepared, and, most insidiously - processed. Our genes are basically used to food that for millenia, was relatively pure, wholesome, unaltered and uncorrupted. So, since the turn of the century, matters began to shift. As manufacturing and processing became more sophisticated, food began to undergo a drastic change. Not having any longer to butcher our own beef, harvest our own vegetables and grains, make our own fats, we could rely on "companies" to start doing it for us. And what did we get in return? Fats (perhaps most disturbingly) are chemically altered and hydrogenated, turning them into dangerous poisons (just READ how margarine is made - it will incite one big colossal "yuck"); animals are mass produced in inhumane warehouses; are fed poor diets and get injected with god knows what; grains and vegetables are grown in sterile, pesticide-laden soils; refined, devitalized sugar and flour is in everything; we're offered and forced everything from hydrogenated fats to high-fructose corn syrup to MSG to plastic sugars. And guess what? This is the sickest, fattest time Americans live in. Heart disease, cancer, obesity, degenerative diseases, are at an all-time high. We have antibiotics, anti-imflammatories to conquer bacterial threats, but even those are getting increasingly less effective through overuse. We have needed the vaccines, antibiotics to treat and cure things like polio, smallpox, measles and a host of other killer diseases, but in return, we have heart disease, cancer, degenerative and neurological dysfunctions in its place. As this exhaustively researched and documented book illustrates, the culprits for this state of affairs is definitely tied to the devastating changes wrought in our foods. Though the medical establishment has found a way to treat diseases, it has ignored many of the current causes of those diseases in the first place.
This book offers a method, a return, so to speak, to a time when food was consumed in its purest state. Ironically, that's a difficult thing to do; only through specialty stores and suppliers can we get naturally raised food. Someone once said: "If God made it, then it's good; if man made it, beware." Most of the food - as cheaply and quickly made as possible - offered in supermarkets is nutritionally worthless, being as it is, refined, processed, laden with questionable chemicals and riddled with substances that have no place in our bodies. The sobering fact remains: most food conglomerates simply don't care about consumers' health.
Sally Fallon, along with Mary G. Enig, have done an astonishing, thorough and painstaking job in spelling out all that one needs to know regarding all manner of information about food. The writing is clear, easy to understand, and concise. The passion and near-missionary fervor with which they have pursued their topic is inspiring and infectious. The breadth of their research and work cannot be overestimated. The scope, level of information, exposés and hardcore truths these women offer is mesmerizing: one is fixated by what they know and the surprising, irrefutable facts that are detailed (by the way, the sidebars in the recipe sections of anecdotes, information and lore are fascinating). Fallon and Enig take on some of the most powerful and ruthless institutions in existence, and effectively challenge claims and biased studies. They even sniff out evidence of lies and corruption. It may in fact be the singular most important body of work on food contained in a single volume. In particular, one needs to pay attention to the information regarding the matter of fats. Enig, a PhD in lipid chemistry, plainly details how fats in today's food supply has wrought health havoc, what to avoid (polyunsaturates and hydrogenated fats are a menace), what is good, and how to go about using them correctly.
Many reviewers in this forum have complained of how complicated it is to take the time to properly prepare many of the foods and recipes Fallon offers. That may be so, but the time invested is worth it. As we as consumers are made more aware of how things must be done, it may be that we simply have no choice ~~ if we are to achieve the best of health ~~ to make the proper preparation of food a top priority once again. Some of the suggestions regarding raw foods is controversial, and not everyone will be convinced, but they make a strong case, nevertheless.
Some of the advice, as well is a bit too severe: Fallon encourages the total elimination of all caffeines, and that includes teas and coffees. No proof has been made that tea and coffee are harmful (unless of course, like anything, it is consumed in excess). Sometimes the book makes absolutely no allowances for an alternate method; some of the advice is eye-opening (like not cooking garlic in oil; sure it will burn if fried in high heat, but it can be sauteed gently. And, everyone KNOWS that refrigeration spoils the taste of tomatoes) In addition, not everyone will welcome the urging of a total abdication from anything even remotely bad for you - why not a white flour, white sugar cake once, twice a year? Despite this, it WAS necessary for Fallon and Enig to overcompensate in the manner they did, for this kind of information is sorely needed; one simply should read it thoroughly, then make their own choices to suit individual needs.
This book will not please vegans and vegetarians, who will be doing a virtual "foul" howl at the convincing scientific argument that we need animal fats and animal based foods. I will never consider vegetarianism after reading this book. Fallon makes a most eloquent plea for the bounty of animals we have been offered.

It is so easy to get carried away by the nutritional information, that it may be easy to overlook the marvelous, inventive and tantalizing recipes. Again, the scope, selection and research on these recipes is amazing...they are numerous, varied, and appetizing. Nearly every cultural cuisine is covered in some small or large part, and are clearly detailed. Most of all, if one relishes culinary challenges, there are some intriguing one as such offered here.
This marvelous volome may be the most valuable nutritional guide one should own. Most of all, it may be the most comprehensive, ground-breaking cookbook ever written ~~ as well as the most nutritionally crucial.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars more than just a cookbook, Jan. 19 2004
By 
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
This cookbook is based on the research of Weston A. Price and on the experience of many different cultures around the world for thousands, if not tens of thousands, of years.
A series of health problems and frustration with allopathic medicine launched me on a huge nutritional research mission several years ago. The area of nutrition is such a jungle of contradiction, wishful thinking, bad research, lies, deceit, and subtrefuge that I almost gave up. I stumbled on Price's research by accident through my discovery of how coconut oil had been so thoroughly lied about in the last thirty years. (It is actually an extremely healthy oil.) What won me over was that his research method and the time in history he did his research constitute the best situation for studying diet we have available.
The research of Weston A. Price is unique and important for many reasons, chief among which is the fact that he was able to study people of many races and traditions still eating the diets that had kept their populations healthy for centuries. He and others who followed his research also investigated these same groups of people when some adopted more processed foods from the Western diet, foods that Price called the "displacing foods of commerce." It would not be possible to do this research today, due to the prevalence of denatured commercial foods all over the world.
This is a great cookbook for getting back to the empirical wisdom of thousands of years of human experience if not millions of years of evolutionary experience. This book has wonderful articles and excerpts from studies and other books in the margins that will help educate you while you cook. It is also a good read just for the information.
It is now my standard wedding gift for young couples. I recommend it without hesitation. I also recommend Price's book, Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, Mary Enig's book, Know Your Fats, and Ronald Schmid's book, Traditional Foods Are Your Best Medicine. These will expand your understanding of what kept our ancestors alive and healthy, and help cut through the fads and disinformation.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it or hate it, this book will make you THINK, May 18 2003
By 
Elizabeth (Montezuma, NM, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
This book, along with Life Without Bread, has seriously changed my life for the better--I have more energy, clearer skin, lower weight, healthier tissue and fewer mood swings ever since I adjusted my diet and methods of food preparation, using many ideas from this book. I am not surprised that this book receives both rave and harsh reviews. Falon herself is a Diet Dictocrat, and what she advocates is radical because it goes against what most of us have been taught about nutrition and about being healthy. However, even if one doesn't adopt her dietary advice (even though I want to, I simply cannot follow it to the letter), just reading the margin notes is highly entertaining and informative. She has an amazing bibliography and some pretty fun facts for anyone interested in food. For example, I love the list of additives commonly found in both commercial ice cream and rubber cement, plastics, etc. I love her diatribe against the processed food industry. I have adopted many of the guidelines and tried most of the recipes. Her technique with soaking and roasting nuts is wonderful, as are some of her gourmet desserts (none of which contain processed white sugar). Her fish recipes are great. I recommend this book--but use it as a book, not as a Bible.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new way of life, Sept. 29 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
None of the ideas in this book are new. In fact, that's the point of the book: there are a lot of old ideas that we have forgotten! Since reading this book our lives are completely different, and our attitudes toward food are completely different, and in fact, I've seen the same changes in the lives of other people I've recommended the book to.
In our family, it is no longer strange to see jars of milk on the counter turning into kefir, or small-beer bubbling away. Our food rarely comes out of cans or packages, and there is a supply of jerky and dried fruit and roasted nuts for snacks and travelling. People who visit think we are really into "gourmet" foods, and indeed, it's gotten so I like our food better than most of the restaurant food. But our health is much better, and our life calmer, somehow.
I'd totally recommend this book for anyone who wants to understand "food" in a more global, historical context. There are some ideas that you will probably want to research further -- the recipes here are "easy and basic" but for things like making sauerkraut and fermented vegies there are all kinds of extras you can learn (and hundreds of recipes floating around).
There are also ideas that will seem shocking at first -- well, lots of the ideas will seem shocking at first -- and you don't need to try all of them unless you want to. The idea of leaving cabbage out at room temperature in a sealed jar seemed like a recipe for botulism to me! But what was amazing to me was that as I researched, I found that the most "shocking" concepts were actually just "normal life" 100 years ago or so. Which goes to show how far we have come from our roots!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The answers are waiting in the pages of this book, Sept. 11 2002
By 
M. Leet "creative-juices" (CT United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
It can be VERY challenging to be a good consumer of today's widely-varied "expert" nutrition advice. The government says "this"; the latest health guru tells you "that"....after a while, it all gets so tiresome. Yet, I kept on looking for what felt right - That's what Sally & Mary's book was, when I first picked it up. There was so much that just seemed so right!!!!
What really proved at least one concept in this book true was the information about fat being **GOOD** for weight-loss and maintenance (should I repeat that?) and my personal experience of this LONG BEFORE I'd ever heard the term "Atkins", or found Sally Fallon and Mary Enig. For over 1 year I had a diet highly restrictive of sugar, and vinegar-containing foods (ie; ketchup, mayo, pre-made salad dressings), and yeasted foods. To be successful on this diet which I perceived to be very restrictive, I increased my fat intake by AT LEAST 40% (in order to make otherwise "boring" food enjoyable). I put butter or extra-virgin olive oil on everything I could. Lo-and-behold, I lost 40 pounds. I kept telling everyone around me, "I'm eating so much fat! How is this possible?". Everyone thought I was just mis-judging my intake. Sally and Mary explain how this unexpected weight loss occurred.
That is just one very small example of why this book should be on every health-concious person's reading list. Okay, so it's not supportive of vegetarianism - believe it or not, there could be good reason for that. It also goes into what kind of dairy can be healthy; The immunity-supporting benefits of homemade soups; Why traditional food-preservation methods are worth re-awakening ourselves to; The health-sustaining properties of traditionally fermented foods (meaning no tofu made with short-cut methods!), and OH-so-much more! You'll be amazed at their "take" on canola oil, and soy "fake foods".
I give this book 5 stars because it absolutely deserves it. You could spend the rest of your life deciphering thousands of resources before finding the remarkably well-researched information in this volume. $$$ is pittance when you think about what you probably spend on health insurance in a month!
Good luck and good health!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great addition to any household, March 5 2007
By 
Rachelle Benoit (London, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats (Paperback)
This book has -a lot- of information to digest about the foods we eat today and the things we should and shouldn't have in our diets. Some of the information startling (especially if this is your first venture into the area of proper nutrition), some of it is just plain common-sense. Although dry at times, the book is a really good read and I highly recommend it. I had a lot of health problems growing up and I am still struggling with a few, but after making some changes in my diet on my own and further changes based on the recommendations in the book, I have found my health to be greatly improved over what it was. Most people I talk to go on and on about how they could never give up certain foods (be it junk food as we know it, or "junk" food as stated in this book) and, before being in a situation where I didn't have access to these items (in fact, couldn't get access to them), I probably would have agreed with them. However, I found that once I necessarily went through a couple of weeks without refined sugar, without caffeine, without other processed and refined foods, the cravings for them stopped completely and my health started to improve by leaps and bounds. While spouting the importance of animal fats and other animal products in the human diet, this book would prove equally useful to strict vegetarians for the equal emphasis put on grains, the proper way to prepare them and the importance of fermented foods. It is much more than a "cookbook" and I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in healthy living.

That said, I can't help my skeptical nature and my love of learning on my own and could not take all Fallon says at face value. While much of it is very true, I find that some of the statements made are "too far on the opposite side of the spectrum." One such comment that I have been doing a lot of personal research on is concerning the nutritive value of Spirulina, something I was introduced to and which "cured" my anemia where other remedies tried did not. It is still a great book and a valuable resource of knowledge, I would just recommend that it not be the end to your research and/or quest to a healthier diet.
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