Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic Work On the UFO Controversy, Nov. 3 2000
By 
Trent K. Rollow (Seal Beach, CA United States) - See all my reviews
Vallee is a true visionary in the UFO field, asking the big questions and nearly always taking the larger view. That UFOs and the "contacts" they make will humans do not fit well into the current picture of interstellar Space Brothers, based purely on observational evidence is a view that most, if not all, UFO buffs will initially reject. However, a careful reading of this book reveals Vallee's painstaking thoroughness in investigating a baffling phenomenon- a phenomenon of contradiction and deception.
The deception goes further than the oft-contradictory message of the aliens: many on Earth are willing messengers of deception as well. The information gap caused by scientific, military, and governmental refusal to seriously consider the phenomenon's true nature have caused all manner of charletons and manipulators to fill the vacuum created by the willful refusal to acknowledge the reality of UFO incidents.
Many of Vallee's fears have already come to pass- the leaders of the Heaven's Gate suicide cult are chronicled nearly twenty years before their mass death. Vallee's observation that whoever is able to eventually control the UFO phenomena may well be coming true before our eyes, yet tragically most are unwilling to see the truth objectively.
This is a complex book that really needs careful reading more than once. If you do this, you'll never look at the UFO phenomena in the same way again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Getting the visitors we deserve., Feb. 23 2001
Don't be put off by the fatuous and juvenile comic-book type illustration which adorns the jacket of 'Messengers of Deception.' This is a serious book, and Jacques Vallee is that rarity among scientists, one who is prepared to brave the scorn of his more timid colleagues by giving the subject of UFOs the serious consideration it deserves. The new point-of-view he brings to this subject is startling.
For Vallee, UFOs are real, and the people who claim to have seen them and even to have been abducted by their occupants are, for the most part, serious and responsible persons who are telling the truth. But as to just what UFOs are and where their occupants come from, Vallee honestly admits that he doesn't know. He does not, however, think that they are spaceships carrying "Space Brothers" from an advanced galactic civilization who have come here to miraculously resolve all human problems, and to help us clean up the mess that we have made of the planet and our lives. But he is seriously concerned that so many people, and not just UFO cultists, are beginning to embrace such a naive and simplistic salvationist belief. In this belief he detects the beginnings of a religious movement which could end up sweeping away existing institutions and lead to very grim consequences for mankind, not the least of which would be the loss of all freedoms.
People to day are tired of the lies and coverups and corruption of government. They are tired of the arrogance and hypocrisy and evasions of official science. They are tired of the wastefulness of the military. They are tired of the depredations of big business. They are ready for change, and many would be only too happy if a tall, handsome, and golden-haired "Space Brother" were to land on earth with the message: "Follow me, and all will be well."
In his thorough investigation of the UFO phenomenon, Vallee seems to detect a pattern. UFOs have made complete fools of our governments, which seem to have nothing meaningful to say about them; of our military, which cannot catch them; and of official science, which cannot provide any explanation of the advanced science at work behind them. All three authorities are furiously pretending that UFOs do not exist, while desperately wishing they would go away. It is, Vallee feels, almost as if we were being conditioned by UFOs to despise earthly authorities of every kind, and to ready ourselves to embrace a new Alien leader or 'Messiah.' But where would this 'Messiah' have come from?
For Vallee, the occupants of UFOs, although they might be Aliens, could just as well be humans, humans who have somehow acquired an advanced technology, humans pretending to be Aliens who are following an agenda created by a secret cabal of "Manipulators." The ultimate aim of these "Manipulators" would presumably be to topple the existing world order and take control themselves, an act not without precedent. If the Christianity of the ancient world, a religion of despised cultists and the uneducated lower orders, could sweep away the Classical world of Greece and Rome, destroy its finest achievements in thought and art and science, and plunge the world into a barbarism from which it has not yet completely emerged, what is there to prevent a new cult, the cult of an Alien and miracle-working Messiah, from doing the same?
'Messengers of Deception' seems to me to be a book that everyone should be reading. The UFOs have not gone away. And Vallee clearly demonstrates that the UFO cultists he has studied, people who "believe" that UFO occupants are good guys, benign Aliens who are here to help us, tend in their thinking to be naive, racist (alien blood is superior), fascist, puritanical, and hostile to human freedom. The dangers of their belief system should be obvious to anyone, and Vallee feels that the continuing refusal of official science to undertake an honest and serious investigation of the UFO phenomenon can only serve to increase the dangers.
Vallee's thesis is, to say the least, startling, and I haven't really been able to do it justice here. He is a well-qualified, thoroughly objective and sensible person, and he has brought forward much interesting evidence to support his case. His book is thoroughly researched, well-written, well-illustrated, and well-documented, and, apart from certain rather abstract theoretical speculations towards the end, is both gripping and easy to read.
UFOs are real. Their occupants are real. But are their occupants Aliens? Or human "Manipulators"? Or an alliance of Alien and human "Manipulators?" Who knows? But whatever they are, it is doubtful that they hold quite such a high opinion of humans as cultists would have us believe. Perhaps, as Jacques Vallee says, "we will get the visitors we deserve."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Messengers of Deception: UFO Contacts and Cults
Messengers of Deception: UFO Contacts and Cults by Jacques Vallee (Paperback - June 1 2008)
CDN$ 18.21 CDN$ 17.84
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews