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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, but title is misleading
This is a really good book. But it is not all about Vince McMahon. It is about wrestling in general, the whole WWF, WCW, Eric Bischoff, the Monday Night Wars. I would have loved to read more behind the scenes stuff w/ McMahon. I don't know why the author named the book what he did, he should have made the title more general. I mean they do talk about Vince, his...
Published on May 27 2004 by Michael Minutaglio

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3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting?
It is tricky to write a review about this book. As one reviewer pointed out already, this book is not specifically about Vince McMahon, 'really'. In fact, a big portion of the book gives you a pretty decent run through of how pro wrestling turned from a local thing to an international thing - sort of a 'pre-WWF history course' type of deal.

The authors do offer...
Published on Aug. 10 2010 by Mperor


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, but title is misleading, May 27 2004
By 
Michael Minutaglio (Staten Island, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment (Paperback)
This is a really good book. But it is not all about Vince McMahon. It is about wrestling in general, the whole WWF, WCW, Eric Bischoff, the Monday Night Wars. I would have loved to read more behind the scenes stuff w/ McMahon. I don't know why the author named the book what he did, he should have made the title more general. I mean they do talk about Vince, his steroid trial, and the way he took over most of the wrestling world. But there are chapters full of info not involving Vince at all. But it is still very entertaining. I liked hearing why Ted Turner bought WCW, Dusty Rhodes almost destroying it with too many "Dusty finishes", how Vince put on Pay Per Views and even a free Royal Rumble on at the same time WCW shows were run, trying to destroy them (I didn't know that!!), the theory behind Goldust and how he started the new direction of the WWF, Brian Pillmans Loose Cannon personality actully being a gimmick Bischoff created, his death and how Mcmahon treated it, among other stuff.
The main problem I had was the author talked about certain wrestlers by their real name, not stage name, and it made me a little confussed, I had to keep going back to see who they were talking about (I ended up reading about this guy I didnt know who it was, then realized it was Ole Anderson). And the Steroid trial, although informative, was a little too informative, too many names of attorneys and watchdogs mentioned. Other than those two tiny things, plus the title being misleading, I really found this book to be very good. Any wrestling fan should pick it up.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting?, Aug. 10 2010
By 
This review is from: Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment (Paperback)
It is tricky to write a review about this book. As one reviewer pointed out already, this book is not specifically about Vince McMahon, 'really'. In fact, a big portion of the book gives you a pretty decent run through of how pro wrestling turned from a local thing to an international thing - sort of a 'pre-WWF history course' type of deal.

The authors do offer a lot of details on various events that transpired, included lawsuits, corporate battles between networks, advertisers, and Vince and his team. It also spent quite an amount of time discussing substance avuses, be it alcohol, drugs or steroids by some of the wrestlers.

There is a fairly succinct but good enough account of the infamous Monday Nights War, and one can get a relatively good sense of what happened, how it happened, and why it ended the way it did.

Overall, the read was satisfactory, as it really gave you a perspective that a modern day WWE fan may not have about the WWE's inner workings, as well as early days.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as Bad as Some People Claim, June 8 2004
By 
"fahrmeier" (Cincinnati, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment (Paperback)
During the first 10 pages of Sex, Lies and Headlocks I learned more about wrestling history than I had in my first 10 years of watching.
This book is an informative retrospective on the history of television wrestling. Is it a biography of Vince McMahon like it claims? Not quite but what it is even more fascinating.
Shaun Assael and Mike Moeneyham have researched their book tremendously, talking to and reading material by some of the foremost authorities in this sport.
Have they left some stuff out? Of course they did, but it the book is less than 300 pages.
Is Vince portrayed as almost evil? Yes, but let's be honest folks, Vince McMahon is not exactly the white angel of professional wrestling. Honestly, no one should expect any wrestling promoter to be painted purely because, professional wrestling is historically a con artists game.
Some will claim that this book is innaccurate and mixed up but the only time that was really a problem for this reader isn't until around the last third of this book when the book inexplicably goes from May of 1998 to November of 1997. After the initial confusion though you do realize what is going on. This book does have tangents but no more tangents than Wrestlecrap, which is almost universally praised.
If you are interested in learning wrestling history this book is a must to at least learn some, and peak your interest to learn more about the subjects discussed.
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1.0 out of 5 stars A Mess of Contradictions and Just a Bad Book, March 21 2004
By 
J. Kersh "poetdoc" (Jackson, Mississippi) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Other reviewers have mentioned the many factual errors in Sex, Lies and Headlocks, so those aren't worth rehashing. However, these apparently novice writers can't decide on a point of view - in one section they're cheering the WWE's or WCW's ratings dominance, the next they're presenting the actions of L. Brent Bozell as if his assertions had some basis in reality. And why is WCW even mentioned outside its role as a competitor? The book is subtitled "The real story of VINCE MCMAHON AND WORLD WRESTLING ENTERTAINMENT." Full chapters are devoted to Eric Bischoff and WCW, presumably to lengthen an already-brief book with plenty of fact-checking problems.
What's more, there is no information here that can't be found in the WWE's own video, The Monday Night Wars, or on WWE Confidential. This "real" story is the same as the one the WWE tells, begging the question, "Why say this again?"
Finally, this book is poorly written and badly edited, lending another level of amateurism to its writers and their publisher. Did no one line-edit this book? If they did, they can take one of my writing classes, as long as they don't expect to do well.
Sex, Lies and Headlocks is a pitiful excuse for a book on anything, much less a book on wrestling or a "tell-all." I regret wasting my money on this piece of unmitigated garbage, and its "writers" should be ashamed of themselves. The world needs far, far fewer books like this one.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Facts wrong., Feb. 24 2004
By 
Jason L. Pemberton (Peoria IL) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment (Paperback)
This book is well written, but not a lot of research was done. It's written like fiction. Andre the Giant did not retire in 1987, as this book states. He won the world title in 88, and the tag titles in 1990.
Sloppy facts and enough made up info and verbiage make this book a no go.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Another journalist's crusade against wrestling, Feb. 8 2004
By 
D. Goldberg "Dave Goldberg" (Long Branch, NJ) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is not a book that does any justice for professional wrestling in the least. It is written by yet another one of these elitist journalists who has a disdain for wrestling. Just to give you an idea of the quality of this book, look at the cover; Vince McMahon's head is placed on Scott Hall's body in some kind juvenile attempt to take a shot at McMahon. On top of that, like most of these pro wrestling haters in the newsroom, it is not factually written, because they don't watch the shows and therefore they don't know much about the topic. Plus they are so insensed on ripping apart Vince McMahon they just plainly don't care, which they show in this heartless, thoughtless diatribe about the wrestling business.
There is not all good in wrestling, but books such as Wrestlecrap, Tributes and the Top 100 cover the hard topics in a tasteful method. The reason is because these books are written by individuals who understand and respect the wrestling business. These elitist journalists make me sick. If you want to learn about wrestling, please don't buy this book, it is just a journalist's hateful look at professional wrestling and we don't need books like this associated with professional wrestling. Just a plainly awful book all the way!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Was this really researched well?, Nov. 26 2003
By A Customer
The major concern I have is whether or not some rarely known facts were thoroughly researched. My concern comes from the fact that there were many inaccuracies in the book that I knew for a fact were wrong. For instance, the Rick Steamboat-Randy Savage WMIII match that Assael claims went nearly an hour, was actually a fifteen minute affair. Assael also writes that Lex Luger slammed Yokozuna on "July 4, 1995" just prior to his shocking appearance on Nitro. Problem was, the bodyslam actually took place July 4, 1993 - big difference. If he can't get this stuff right - which is can be found very easily in any old PWI Almanac - how can we trust him to know what was going on in meetings with Vince McMahon and Ted Turner held behind closed doors?
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4.0 out of 5 stars The "Real" Story?, Oct. 16 2003
This book has a bad tendency to jump around a lot in history, going from one year to the next without any clear transitions, so in one page, you'll be talking about Bruno and Gorgeous George (Wagner), then the next, talking about Marc Mero and Sable.
Putting that aside, it is a very enjoyable read, not terribly accurate in places, and often attributing personality traits to people mentioned within the book that seem inconsistent with what has been previously established. If you're looking for a National Enquirer type feel to the book, you won't find it here. Mr. Assael and Mr. Mooneyham attempt to paint a historical look at how the World Wrestling Federation became the global power that it is currently.
Again, not terribly accurate in places, from what has been established previously by such notable people as Dave Meltzer, Mike Champman, and other wrestling personalities. However, aside from all that, it is still very entertaining and enlightening, but it lacks scope. It seems that the main purpose is to bring us from Vince Sr.'s Capitol Wrestling to the WWF's purchase of WCW in 2001 with as little detail as possible in between.
A worthwhile purchase, but not an essential item. Wait until it becomes a remainder item, and get it for under $10.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read, Aug. 16 2003
By 
John Alapick (Harveys Lake, PA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Sex, Lies, And Headlocks is a very good account of the rise, fall, and the late 90's emergence of Vince McMahon and the WWE. It is a very interesting read, not only discussing the WWE, but also discussing what was going with their competition (AWA, UWF, and NWA which later became WCW). Many of the early chapters focus on their mainstream crossover in the '80s, which turns out to be a pleasant surprise. The information regarding Vince's competition, particularly WCW, is very insightful reading. The book also gives heavy attention to Vince's more trying times, such as the failures of the WBF and XFL and especially the early '90s steroid trials. His constant friction with the USA network is also very well chronicled. It also goes into detail of his earlier risk-taking ventures such as his involvement in Evel Knievel's jump over Snake River Canyon and his early days working as an announcer when his father Vince Sr. was still running the WWE. Occasionally, the book tends to go off of its chronological path, making it a tad hard to follow, but it's still hard to put down once you start reading. Definitely worth checking out, especially to WWE fans who began watching in the late '90s who are interested in how Vince McMahon and the WWE became what they are today.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Title is misleading, July 29 2003
By 
Joe (Monsey, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This is billed as, "The Real Story of Vince McMahon and the World Wrestling Federation", but this book is REALLY about the hisotry of the television development of the WWF, WCW, and NWA. The book is primarliy about how wrestling gained exposure through cable television and how the WWF and WCW eventually became giants through television and how WCW "overtook" the WWF in the ratings, and then going back to second fiddle to their eventual demise.
It's fairly easy reading. I finished this in two days.
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Sex, Lies, and Headlocks: The Real Story of Vince McMahon and World Wrestling Entertainment
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