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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books ever
This book is one of the best book Ive ever read. I've never took an interest in reading until my sister told me about the book, once I opened it I couldn't stop reading, I read the book in 2 days. For all the critics that think it's not a real story they just made it up ect... The book obviously wasn't written in the 2000's, drug use now is way different then back then,...
Published on Aug. 5 2009 by S. Stanford

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars it was ok
I started the book anxious to knowing more about this alice character but once getting into it all i was waiting for was a climax, or some point in which i would understand the reasoning behind this diary being published. i found myself disappointed at the end when nothing of value happened, surely this character or girl, made the mistakes everyone thought about risking...
Published on Nov. 27 2003 by ruby soho


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books ever, Aug. 5 2009
By 
S. Stanford (Montreal) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Go Ask Alice (Paperback)
This book is one of the best book Ive ever read. I've never took an interest in reading until my sister told me about the book, once I opened it I couldn't stop reading, I read the book in 2 days. For all the critics that think it's not a real story they just made it up ect... The book obviously wasn't written in the 2000's, drug use now is way different then back then, just because you're a drug user and your story isnt close to what was written doesnt mean it's not true.
The book overall is amazing and I think everyone should at least take a look at it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Book I Can't Stop Obsessing About...., July 21 2005
By 
This is a moving and thought-provoking look into the mind of a young girl who is gleeful to lose three pounds and angst-ridden when she eats french fries, and, in a perfect period touch, who confides her plans for a yearbook autograph party:
"I'm going to wear my new white pants suit, and I have to go now and wash my hair and put it up. It's really getting long, long, long, but if I put it up on orange juice cans I can make it have just the right amount of body and a nice large curl on the bottom. I hope we have enough cans--we've got to! We've simply got to!"
Much later in the book, of course, you'll get passages like the following, written when "Alice" was supposedly in a mental hospital:
"I can't close my eyes because the worms are still crawling on me. They are eating me. They are crawling in my nose and gnawing in my mouth and oh God... I've got to get you back in your case because the maggots are crawling off my bleeding writhing hands into your pages. I will lock you in. You will be safe."
Obviously, it has lost none of its provocative flavor or shock value.
And yet, despite all its sensationalism, this was an important book for me. God knows there weren't a lot of kids my age who could have enjoyed musing with me about it all.
"Goddamned stupid people," Alice would say, "I'd like to shove life down all their throats and then maybe they'd understand what it's all about."
And that's what I read her for, because you weren't going to get that clarity from Caddie Woodlawn or Ramona the Pest or even, God help her, Anne Frank--though I knew and loved them all.
Of course she was flawed, my Alice. She was stupid enough to mess around with too much acid, not to mention heroin. And then she could utter such patent idiocy as the following, about the guy for whom she's dealing at the high school and junior high:
"Richie is so good, good, good to me and sex with him is like lightning and rainbows and springtime.... He's going into medicine, and I have to help him any way I can. It's going to be a long hard pull but we'll make it.... I think I won't go on to college. Dad will just curl up and die, but it's more important to me to work and help Rich. As soon as I'm out of high school I'll get a full time job and we'll settle down...."
Even at eight I knew better than that, but of course Alice didn't grow up in a community of single mothers and boyfriends and step dads and the child support checks that never came. I could have sat her down with my mom and some pals for a cup of coffee and knocked that lunacy right out of her head in about fifteen minutes, but poor Alice had "straight" parents, so she didn't know better and I had to cut her some slack.
Still today, she's the big sister I never had, though she was probably the pastiche of a snarky Williams guy at Prentice-Hall in real life, patched together from a few issues of Seventeen and some chick he sat next to at a Jefferson Airplane concert. I don't care. Alice is family--even if she doesn't live here anymore. Great book! But try it for yourself! Pick up a copy. Another book I need to recommend -- very much on my mind since I purchased a "used" copy off Amazon is "The Losers' Club: Complete Restored Edition" by Richard Perez, an exceptional, highly entertaining, somewhat subversive little novel I can't stop thinking about.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Book I Can't Stop Obsessing About...., May 24 2005
By 
This is a moving and thought-provoking look into the mind of a young girl who is gleeful to lose three pounds and angst-ridden when she eats french fries, and, in a perfect period touch, who confides her plans for a yearbook autograph party:
"I'm going to wear my new white pants suit, and I have to go now and wash my hair and put it up. It's really getting long, long, long, but if I put it up on orange juice cans I can make it have just the right amount of body and a nice large curl on the bottom. I hope we have enough cans--we've got to! We've simply got to!"
Much later in the book, of course, you'll get passages like the following, written when "Alice" was supposedly in a mental hospital:
"I can't close my eyes because the worms are still crawling on me. They are eating me. They are crawling in my nose and gnawing in my mouth and oh God... I've got to get you back in your case because the maggots are crawling off my bleeding writhing hands into your pages. I will lock you in. You will be safe."
Obviously, it has lost none of its provocative flavor or shock value.
And yet, despite all its sensationalism, this was an important book for me. God knows there weren't a lot of kids my age who could have enjoyed musing with me about it all.
"Goddamned stupid people," Alice would say, "I'd like to shove life down all their throats and then maybe they'd understand what it's all about."
And that's what I read her for, because you weren't going to get that clarity from Caddie Woodlawn or Ramona the Pest or even, God help her, Anne Frank--though I knew and loved them all.
Of course she was flawed, my Alice. She was stupid enough to mess around with too much acid, not to mention heroin. And then she could utter such patent idiocy as the following, about the guy for whom she's dealing at the high school and junior high:
"Richie is so good, good, good to me and sex with him is like lightning and rainbows and springtime.... He's going into medicine, and I have to help him any way I can. It's going to be a long hard pull but we'll make it.... I think I won't go on to college. Dad will just curl up and die, but it's more important to me to work and help Rich. As soon as I'm out of high school I'll get a full time job and we'll settle down...."
Even at eight I knew better than that, but of course Alice didn't grow up in a community of single mothers and boyfriends and step dads and the child support checks that never came. I could have sat her down with my mom and some pals for a cup of coffee and knocked that lunacy right out of her head in about fifteen minutes, but poor Alice had "straight" parents, so she didn't know better and I had to cut her some slack.
Still today, she's the big sister I never had, though she was probably the pastiche of a snarky Williams guy at Prentice-Hall in real life, patched together from a few issues of Seventeen and some chick he sat next to at a Jefferson Airplane concert. I don't care. Alice is family--even if she doesn't live here anymore. Great book! But try it for yourself! Pick up a copy. Another book I need to recommend -- very much on my mind since I purchased a "used" copy off Amazon is "The Losers' Club: Complete Restored Edition" by Richard Perez, an exceptional, highly entertaining, somewhat subversive little novel I can't stop thinking about.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A MUST read, June 15 2004
By A Customer
Enter the world of a drug addict, cold, horrifying, and lurid. Enter the world of a seemingly average 15 year-old girl who stumbles upon drugs unknowingly one day at a friend's party and staggers into a world far more bloodcurdling than she ever expected. Enter the world of one frightened little girl playing a game far too complex for her feeble little mind. The anonymity of the book suggests that this girl could be anywhere, Japan, Mars, England, Tucson, and even in your neighborhood. Enter the world of Go Ask Alice.
Starting off slowly, and also rather boringly, the book begins with a younger, and nonetheless more naive Alice, an average teenager, writing about the ups and downs of everyday life, boys, and dieting, and mainly, her move out of her comfortable life in her home town to somewhere new. But this information, however superfluous it seems, is imperative to understanding the drastic changes that Alice undergoes later in the book- the change from the giddy little girl to the drained, weary young woman she becomes.
After somewhat of a struggle to meet new people and find friends in her new town, Alice spends a few weeks with her grandmother back in her old town. There she meets "Jill", and the two become fast friends, which is odd because they were never friends earlier. Alice is enthralled with Jill and her friends; she can't get enough of them. She eagerly accepts an invite to one of Jill's parties one fateful Friday night, and it is there, with a can of Coke and a little bit of a hallucinogenic called LSD, there where Alice's plunge begins.
From here, the novel is face-paced and vivacious, corresponding well with Alice's life at the moment. Upon Alice's return home, she experiments with more drugs, denying any trace of an addiction and delves herself into even more trouble, running away from home in the middle of the night, engaging in "swinger" parties, dropping out of school, and more.
At this point, the novel is very exciting, albeit somewhat hard to follow at times. But any experienced reader will have no trouble with this-Readers are fascinated with the novel just as much as Alice is fascinated with this new world she is exploring.
The end of the book is terrifying but poignant and heartbreaking, and will most certainly bring tears to the reader's eyes. As a young teenager myself, I can say with all of my heart that I will never become a drug user, especially after reading this compelling novel. It is unequivocally saddening to see how many teens fall under traps nearly identical to the one Alice falls under in the book. The book itself is not at a difficult level, and personally, I feel that it is a must that everyone, ages 12 and older, should read it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Kathleen's radical Review, June 15 2004
By A Customer
I read the fabulous book, Go Ask Alice. It is about a girl who started off as a good kid in a nice little town until she went off to a party and tried drugs. She ends up running away from home and becoming addicted. Alice turns from a great kid in a nice town to a drug addict in the slums. You follow Alice through her diary and through her life, parties, the mental institution, and even on the streets. You can't help but feel bad and mad at her at the same time. You just don't know.
Go Ask Alice is a fabulous story the really hits home for most teenagers who are pressured to do drugs. The fact that it's a true story really shows other readers and me how real it is and the consequences of doing drugs. Go Ask Alice is a wonderful story and i recomend it to any teenager who is looking for a storyto grab you in and never let you out until the final twist and the magnificant ending.
This book should be read by teenagers because it shows you hat could happen to you. This is a true story and should be taken seriously. Please read this! It is so good and you will really be missing out on something great!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Go ask Alice, May 31 2004
This book is about a unnamed girl, who they call Alice.She keeps a diary and it talks about her life, everything that she had experience during her adolescence. She talks about her experiments with boys, drugs, and losing her virginity. Alice is a troubled girl who deals with her weight gain, her parents, and school. Alice' dad had taken a teaching job at another college, and Alice's family had to move to a new town. She made friends with her neighbor Beth, and during summer she went to a summer camp. Alice was forced to move into her Grandparents house. She didn't like living there at first because she didn't have any friends, but one day she had saw an old friend, Jill who had invited her to a party. It was then that Alice had her first drug experience, and from then on she kept doing them. Alice lost her virginity to a boy named Roger, she thought she had gotten pregnant from it. She later meets a girl name Chris, who she runs away with and starts her new life. They lived in an apartment and had jobs, but Alice missed her family and she went back home. Alice falls in love with a boy names Joel, and she opens up to him.
The only thing that I could find wrong the book was the ending. The ending of the book leaves you hanging. It talks about how her life has changed for the better. It seems like the ending is going to lead up to her death or some big thing, but instead it was a slow change to her deciding not to write in it any more. The entire book was amazing and I couldn't wait to get to the end, but when I did it was a little disappointing.
One good thing about the book was how interesting it was. The way they tell her story really makes you feel for her. When she takes the drugs I found myself saying what are you thinking. The book seemed real and I could relate to it well.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Go Ask Alice, May 28 2004
By 
Danielle Chebabi (south pasadena, CA USA) - See all my reviews
A taste of reality is what you'll get once yove read Go Ask Alice the intriguing real dieary of the not so ordinary life of Alice. This book will put you in the shoes of someone who has suffered, learned, and gotten throught difficulties that changed her life and might just as well change your outlook on drugs. Reading of how one teenage girls life gets flipped upside down just because a classmate slips her some LSD through a drink at a not so innocent party,will leave some readers in shock of what happens to Alice, while others can relate to what Alice goes through. Alice deals with so many ups and downs in her life youll never know what the outcome of her next decision will be. Just reading about the crazy life of this girl makes you feel as if you've been through it yourself. This captivating diary makes you wake up to reality and realize what can happen to you when you take just the slightest amount of drugs. Turning an ordinary innocent girl into a drug addict. And just when you think Alice has gotten over her addiction to drugs her life takes another big turn making her end up in positions no one would ever want to experience.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Novel, May 19 2004
By 
Clare (Bak Middle School of the Arts, West Palm Beach, Florida) - See all my reviews
Despite some very intense scenes that had me cringing, Go Ask Alice was a fabulous non-fiction book. It is the story of a teenage girl that falls into the drug crowd at school at the delicate age of 15, and her life starts descending from there.
'Anonymous', the supposed author of the diary, documented her life very specifically and detailed. Alice, the teenager, authored a great diary. It all starts when one day she "accidentally" consumes some LSD in the Coca-Cola at a party she attended. It all goes down from there. She runs away, tries to be adult, and then falls back to the comfort of her own home. She experiences intense highs and horrible lows, one minute going to "I love life" attitude, to the next, wanting to die. Go Ask Alice made, I think, the biggest impact on me than any book has ever made. It is an excruciating story on what drugs really do to you. I wasn't planning on experimenting with drugs before I read this book, but the book definitely sealed the deal. It was horrible reading about some child, who basically ruined her life because she turned it over to drugs. She had the choice of quitting, and she did; well, she at least tried. Once you fall into the crowd, there is no coming out. After Alice came back, she tried to stay clean, but the 'druggies' would not leave her alone. Wherever she turned they threatened to give acid to her sister in the form of candy, or plant marijuana in her dads car. There is no doubt that I would recommend this book to everybody else. In my opinion, the book should be required reading in eighth or ninth grade, because that is when it matters whom you start to hang out with and whom you start to play around with. I have read other books about teens falling into drug abuse, and messing up their life, but this one was the most tragic. In various books, the story is intense and goes into great detail about the 'drug life', but everyone at the closing ends up happy, drug-free and alive. This didn't; a horrible thing happened to Alice three weeks after she stopped writing in her diary. This was real, despite people thinking that somebody wrote the book, and not thinking that it was an actual diary. If somebody did not go through this, then they must have an intensely vivid imagination, because this was real. Go Ask Alice had me feeling like I was actually there, watching her go through the hell she was going through, watching her go through the struggle and pain in her low ends, yet also the laughter and joy in her high ends. Once you start reading you don't want to stop. I like to read, don't get me wrong, but some books that are recommended, or are required to read, are just plain boring. Go Ask Alice was recommended to me by my eighth grade language arts teacher, and many friends, and I am glad that it was. It is almost addicting, you want the pages to go faster and you are able to read them quicker. For example, one scene that had me feeling for her, and pulled me into the book, was when she innocently went to go baby-sit, but the next morning ended up in a mental hospital. Somebody had planted acid on chocolate-covered peanuts that she had eaten, and they made her go crazy. This was the most intense scene in the book, and one that made me realize just how bad it is to start drugs, and just how horrible it is to have your life cut short because of them. Despite some very intense scenes that had me cringing, Go Ask Alice was a fabulous non-fiction book. It is the story of a teenage girl that falls into the drug crowd at school at the delicate age of 15, and her life starts descending from there.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Go Ask Alice- Delve into her World, May 17 2004
By 
"lkm89" (Bak Middle School of the Arts) - See all my reviews
Enter the world of a drug addict, cold, horrifying, and lurid. Enter the world of a seemingly average 15 year-old girl who stumbles upon drugs unknowingly one day at a friend's party and staggers into a world far more bloodcurdling than she ever expected. Enter the world of one frightened little girl playing a game far too complex for her feeble little mind. The anonymity of the book suggests that this girl could be anywhere, Japan, Mars, England, Tucson, and even in your neighborhood. Enter the world of Go Ask Alice.
Starting off slowly, and also rather boringly, the book begins with a younger, and nonetheless more naive Alice, an average teenager, writing about the ups and downs of everyday life, boys, and dieting, and mainly, her move out of her comfortable life in her home town to somewhere new. But this information, however superfluous it seems, is imperative to understanding the drastic changes that Alice undergoes later in the book- the change from the giddy little girl to the drained, weary young woman she becomes.
After somewhat of a struggle to meet new people and find friends in her new town, Alice spends a few weeks with her grandmother back in her old town. There she meets "Jill", and the two become fast friends, which is odd because they were never friends earlier. Alice is enthralled with Jill and her friends; she can't get enough of them. She eagerly accepts an invite to one of Jill's parties one fateful Friday night, and it is there, with a can of Coke and a little bit of a hallucinogenic called LSD, there where Alice's plunge begins.
From here, the novel is face-paced and vivacious, corresponding well with Alice's life at the moment. Upon Alice's return home, she experiments with more drugs, denying any trace of an addiction and delves herself into even more trouble, running away from home in the middle of the night, engaging in "swinger" parties, dropping out of school, and more.
At this point, the novel is very exciting, albeit somewhat hard to follow at times. But any experienced reader will have no trouble with this-Readers are fascinated with the novel just as much as Alice is fascinated with this new world she is exploring.
The end of the book is terrifying but poignant and heartbreaking, and will most certainly bring tears to the reader's eyes. As a young teenager myself, I can say with all of my heart that I will never become a drug user, especially after reading this compelling novel. It is unequivocally saddening to see how many teens fall under traps nearly identical to the one Alice falls under in the book. The book itself is not at a difficult level, and personally, I feel that it is a must that everyone, ages 12 and older, should read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Go Ask Alice- Delve into her World, May 17 2004
By 
"lkm89" (Bak Middle School of the Arts) - See all my reviews
Enter the world of a drug addict, cold, horrifying, and lurid. Enter the world of a seemingly average 15 year-old girl who stumbles upon drugs unknowingly one day at a friend's party and staggers into a world far more bloodcurdling than she ever expected. Enter the world of one frightened little girl playing a game far too complex for her feeble little mind. The anonymity of the book suggests that this girl could be anywhere, Japan, Mars, England, Tucson, and even in your neighborhood. Enter the world of Go Ask Alice.
Starting off slowly, and also rather boringly, the book begins with a younger, and nonetheless more naive Alice, an average teenager, writing about the ups and downs of everyday life, boys, and dieting, and mainly, her move out of her comfortable life in her home town to somewhere new. But this information, however superfluous it seems, is imperative to understanding the drastic changes that Alice undergoes later in the book- the change from the giddy little girl to the drained, weary young woman she becomes.
After somewhat of a struggle to meet new people and find friends in her new town, Alice spends a few weeks with her grandmother back in her old town. There she meets "Jill", and the two become fast friends, which is odd because they were never friends earlier. Alice is enthralled with Jill and her friends; she can't get enough of them. She eagerly accepts an invite to one of Jill's parties one fateful Friday night, and it is there, with a can of Coke and a little bit of a hallucinogenic called LSD, there where Alice's plunge begins.
From here, the novel is face-paced and vivacious, corresponding well with Alice's life at the moment. Upon Alice's return home, she experiments with more drugs, denying any trace of an addiction and delves herself into even more trouble, running away from home in the middle of the night, engaging in "swinger" parties, dropping out of school, and more.
At this point, the novel is very exciting, albeit somewhat hard to follow at times. But any experienced reader will have no trouble with this-Readers are fascinated with the novel just as much as Alice is fascinated with this new world she is exploring.
The end of the book is terrifying but poignant and heartbreaking, and will most certainly bring tears to the reader's eyes. As a young teenager myself, I can say with all of my heart that I will never become a drug user, especially after reading this compelling novel. It is unequivocally saddening to see how many teens fall under traps nearly identical to the one Alice falls under in the book. The book itself is not at a difficult level, and personally, I feel that it is a must that everyone, ages 12 and older, should read it.
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Go Ask Alice
Go Ask Alice by Anonymous (Paperback - Jan. 1 2006)
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