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5.0 out of 5 stars Be still my pounding heart...
This goes into my favorite of Bujold's books (and they're all great) along with _Barrayar_, and _Mirror Dance_. A great book for anyone just starting to read about Miles or those who are continuing the saga from earlier books. A book you'll want ot read again and again! It has a great complex plot, deep and unique characters who will get you attached, a bit of romance,...
Published on July 7 2003 by Empyreal

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit slow
Fans of Bujold's Miles Vorkosigan saga will probably enjoy the personal growth of the series' hero in "Memory." Miles, cashiered from his beloved military for lying about a serious incident precipitated by one of his seizures - an aftereffect of his cryo-resurrection - falls into a depression on his home world, the rigidly class-conscious Barrayar.
And...
Published on June 4 2004 by Lynn Harnett


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit slow, June 4 2004
By 
Lynn Harnett (Marathon, FL USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Memory (Hardcover)
Fans of Bujold's Miles Vorkosigan saga will probably enjoy the personal growth of the series' hero in "Memory." Miles, cashiered from his beloved military for lying about a serious incident precipitated by one of his seizures - an aftereffect of his cryo-resurrection - falls into a depression on his home world, the rigidly class-conscious Barrayar.
And then nothing much happens for the next 200 pages, until the precise and unflappable Simon Illyan, head of Imperial Security, begins acting peculiar.
Miles' self-appointed task is to get to the bottom of what has happened to Simon and who is responsible.
Bujold invests her characters with plenty of wit and charm, and Miles' investigation uses standard mystery techniques against a space-opera background, but the solution to the mystery will be obvious to most at least a hundred pages before Miles gets it.
Nevertheless, this is an enjoyable read and Miles reaches a major new turning point in his career before it's over.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Be still my pounding heart..., July 7 2003
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
This goes into my favorite of Bujold's books (and they're all great) along with _Barrayar_, and _Mirror Dance_. A great book for anyone just starting to read about Miles or those who are continuing the saga from earlier books. A book you'll want ot read again and again! It has a great complex plot, deep and unique characters who will get you attached, a bit of romance, and a great who dunnit mystery!
The suspense is just... outstanding. It's one of those books where you'll stay up all night attempting to finish it, and when you can't you'll allow yourself a few hours sleep before you begin your mission anew. So suspenseful you'll want to flip ahead just to ease the pounding of your heart.
It's also deep. Like Bujold's earlier books, it's not just about plot. It's about each character striving with his/her own demons and discovering new things about him/herself. Both Miles and Illyan are thrown down further than they thought they could go and have to find that they can go on, even if it hurts.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Be still my pounding heart..., July 7 2003
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
This goes into my favorite of Bujold's books (and they're all great) along with _Barrayar_, and _Mirror Dance_. A great book for anyone just starting to read about Miles or those who are continuing the saga from earlier books. A book you'll want ot read again and again! It has a great complex plot, deep and unique characters who will get you attached, a bit of romance, and a great who dunnit mystery!
The suspense is just... outstanding. It's one of those books where you'll stay up all night attempting to finish it, and when you can't you'll allow yourself a few hours sleep before you begin your mission anew. So suspenseful you'll want to flip ahead just to ease the pounding of your heart.
It's also deep. Like Bujold's earlier books, it's not just about plot. It's about each character striving with his/her own demons and discovering new things about him/herself. Both Miles and Illyan are thrown down further than they thought they could go and have to find that they can go on, even if it hurts.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Miles grows up, Jan. 29 2003
By 
K. Newman "krazykmcd" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
Following his death in 'Mirror Dance', Miles finds that there are complications to his recovery - complications that lead to near-disaster on a Dendarii mission. Rather than revealing all to Simon Illyan, Miles attempts a cover up. Found out, he is released from military service. The 'little admiral' must now cease to exist.
It is time for Lord Vorkosigan to come into his own, as a crisis develops over the life of Simon Illyan, as Simon's memory chip appears to go into meltdown. Miles is forced to take drastic action, with the aid of the Emperor, action which ultimately leads to his redemption. And finally Lord Vorkosigan gets a little of the respect that is due to him for his service.
Much less action in this book than previously in the series, the main point of interest aside from trying to work out who if anyone is the baddie here, is the internalisation of Mile's struggle to integrate Admiral Naismmith and Lord Vorkosigan into 'Miles'. The battle is internal and at one hilarious point also external. It is something very different from the previous books in the series, and clearly key to the next phase in Miles' life. He really comes into his own here, and the conflict is ultimately resolved peacefully, if not without losses.
A great addition to the series, if a little slower paced and with less external action than usual. It's about time Miles matured - it will be interesting to see where he goes next.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great story, a step above her others, Nov. 12 2002
By 
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
I've read all the Vorkosigan books and there's always been enough going on to raise them above simple space opera fluff. So many authors that write multiple books with the same characters can't manage to keep them fresh. But Miles continues to evolve and grow. I think this book will be more meaningful to people who have read the others but it's much better than her first couple of books, so I'm not sure what to recommend as a starting point. Barrayar maybe which won a Hugo.
I've been a fan of these since grade school (I'm 14 now) but this book amazed me so I just had to give it a review. If you read for characters read these books. This one in particular is a deeply character-based story and I was surprised I liked it so much. I usually like things with more action but I was riveted as I watched Miles screw himself over. It was just so utterly human. So many authors don't get how to make their characters human but Bujold is a master of this. When her characters mess up you cringe. When they triumph you cheer. Her ability to evoke that much passion in me is what makes me give this 5 stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good lord, can this woman write a damn good story!, Oct. 15 2002
By 
Dussan (Baltimore, MD United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
I like my heroes tall dark, handsome. Namely because I am tall, dark, and relatively handsome (or so my mother and various siblings assure me).
I hate short characters. I like to envision myself as the hero of the book, and I can't do that with a dwarfish disfigured hunchback, therefore I dont' like reading about them.
I change my mind.
If you have not read any of the previous Vorkosigan adventures then start with Cordelias Honor, and then pick up Warrior's Apprentice to start the Miles adventures.
For the veterans of the hyperactive dwarfs' previous adventures here is the skinny on this one.
After awaking from cryo-revival, Miles is suffering from some continuous medical problems. After a Dendarii mission, that ends with one little wrinkle ( a damn funny one too!), Miles is recalled home to Barrayar to face the music.
Much of the book deals with Miles' coming to grips with his life without "Admiral Naismith". He struggles to find himself, while at the same time uncover the mystery behind Simon Illyan's damaged memory chip.
While Miles is growing as a character and not an extension of "The Little Admiral", several supporting characters, really come in to there own light. Namely Simon Illyan.
This is a great book, light on action but oh so good a read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A New Career for Miles, July 3 2002
By 
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
The first half of the book deals with Miles' old life as Admiral Naismith becoming a memory: he has to re-invent himself (again). Tragic circumstances - his former mentor's loss of memory - open up an unusual opportunity for our hero: to become an Imperial auditor. To quote from the book: "imperial with capital imp".
So the book becomes a mystery with Miles as the investigator and - naturally - his cousin Ivan as the sidekick. And it is a great story with all the colorful, romantic background of Barrayar.
If "Mirror Dance" was the very dark but brilliant story about his clone-brother becoming Lord Mark, then this is Miles' turn to really become Lord Vorkossigan, new suite and kitchen-staff included. There is also romance in the book, but it mostly evades Miles - well, at least the emperor is happy ...
A mystery, romance, a search for oneself - it's all there in this book. I regard it as one of the best of this brilliant series. To read it before "Komarr" (and consequently "A Civil Campaign") is recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Most Excellent "Memory", July 2 2002
By 
Paul (New Orleans) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
"Memory" is a major transition novel in the Vorkosigan Saga, with Ms. Bujold asking her characters to face questions about identity. This is an outstanding work of fiction, and "Memory" works well as a stand alone novel, but it can be seen as the second half of an adventure begun in "Brothers in Arms" and also as the start of a story which will continue into "Komarr" and conclude in "A Civil Campaign."
The Vorkosigan Saga follows the adventures of Miles Vorkosigan, starting with the early stories of how Miles' mother and father met. Miles is only 4'9" tall, and was born with brittle bones, the reult of a poison gas attack on his parents while his mother was pregnant with him. Miles is the heir to one of the 60 Counts on his home planet of Barrayar, a planet which places great pride on military (and therefore physical) skill. Circumstances resulted in a 17 year-old Miles creating a mercenary unit, the Dendarii Mercenaries, of which Miles assumed command, in the persona of Admiral Naismith.
In the world of Barrayar, Miles is Lieutenant Vorkosigan, publicly a mere galactic courier for Imperial Security (ImpSec). But Miles is also Lord Vorkosigan, heir to his father, Count Vorkosigan, future ruler of one of 60 Districts on Barrayar, foster brother to the Emperor himself. But out in the galaxy, Miles has the persona of Admiral Naismith, commander of over 5,000 people and a fleet of warships.
In "Memory", events conspire against Miles, who has always managed to overcome his physical defects by sheer will-power, forcing him to lose his positions as both Admiral Naismith and Lieutenant Vorkosigan. Miles is forced to ask himself "Who is Miles Vorkosigan? Is he Lord Vorkosigan, Admiral Naismith or Lieutenant Vorkosigan? Or perhaps he's someone more.
Simon Ilyan, feared head of ImpSec (and whom Miles had called Uncle Simon until he entered the Imperial military academy), is also forced to find out who he is. Ilyan had a memory chip installed in his brain on the orders of the past emperor, giving him perfect recall. But if a chip containing 40 years of memories goes haywire, is it the man or the chip that has been responsible for Simon Ilyan's legendary success?
"Memory" is an outstanding work of fiction. Ms. Bujold is a master wordcrafter, and her novels are always a delight. "Memory" and the rest of the Vorkosigan Saga cannot be highly recommended enough.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Introspective look at Miles, Feb. 4 2002
By 
David Roy (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
While Mirror Dance is still the best Vorkosigan book so far, Memory is almost up there. After having explored Miles' brother Mark's character so vividly in Mirror Dance, Bujold turns to her main character in Memory, bringing Miles to a turning point in his life and showing what makes him tick. She does this by having Miles go through a crisis of conscience that ends up blowing up in his face.
After what happened to him in Mirror Dance, Miles goes through some introspection about the way his career has gone. What he does puts him at odds with Simon Illyan, the head of Imperial Security. The results from this send Miles on a downward mental spiral. While all of this is going on, a plot against Simon presents itself, and Miles has to figure out what's going on. Seeing how Miles deals with all of this is one of the best things about the book. The last couple of Bujold books have shown a great maturity in writing style that I really like.
A couple of reviewers have mentioned how predictable the Simon plot is. I have to agree, but I would say that it's beside the point. The reason for this novel is not the plot against Simon, but how Miles deals with it, and how he incorporates it into his dealing with his other issues. It doesn't matter that the plot is predictable, because the only reason it is there is to showcase Miles and his thought processes. In handling this dilemma, Miles makes great strides in his maturity. He's gone past the daring-do of his Admiral Naismith persona and become a much more well-rounded person. He discovers that he's been denying his real self as Miles Vorkosigan, and burying it in Admiral Naismith.
It's a great treat to read this book and see how Miles progresses. He comes out of the book a much better person than he went into it as. I really like the way the character has progressed. I also like the way Bujold has refused to leave Miles a static character. Too many series fall into that trap of never having major changes to the lead character. Miles is still incredibly interesting, but he's not the same man who started the series.
I would not recommend starting your reading of the Miles series with Memory. It references every single book and story that Miles has starred in so far. Everything is explained well enough for the first time reader, but I think you'd get more enjoyment out of it if you've read the previous books. However, Memory is a standout in the series, and should definitely be read by any Bujold fan. I'm enjoying my run through this series (though I'm taking a break now before moving on to Komarr), and that's certainly a great way to be exposed to the saga. I heartily recommend doing it that way. Buy them all!
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5.0 out of 5 stars 8 stars, actually, Jan. 3 2001
This review is from: Memory (Mass Market Paperback)
I began the Miles saga with Memory, and although I did not understand several allusions at the beginning of the book, the story rolled along anyway, building momentum. I CARED what happened to this aging adolescent (the story begins just shy of his 30th birthday.) Miles has managed to finaglehis way through repeated scams, and in this book, the scams all catch up with him at once. One thinks of "coming of age" stories as happening in the late teens and early 20's, and of learning to relate to others. Instead, Miles must deal with a deep split in his identity, and forge, quite literally, a psychic INTEGRITY. And at the same time, he must decide whether a crime has been committed against his former mentor, and if so, what to do about it. Memory worked for me on every level. I've laughed and cried through it and the other Miles books 5 times since July, when I began reading them. Yes, the allusions make more sense now that I know who the other characters are and what the history is. But this is Miles's story, and my GOD, what a story it is! A must read!
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