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5.0 out of 5 stars The BEST books ever!!
I originally bought this book on "accident" at a used book store. Something to read that looked interesting... once I had picked it up I COULDNT put it down. It really makes you want to know what happens on the next page. I was disappointed when it was over... I didn’t realize that it was the first(I cant believe my luck) of many. And the thing is every book that...
Published on Nov. 3 2006 by Maxine Mccurdy

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3.0 out of 5 stars The discription and art is the only magic here
It was the cover art that first caught my eye, it was beautiful. This book is very descriptive but at the same time it can also be very boring. This is not the stories fault no, not by any means the story itself is in depth and descriptive. I loved the story when I finally found the time to finish it.
My main complant is about the main character "Lerris" I found...
Published on Jan. 8 2003 by General Pete


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5.0 out of 5 stars The BEST books ever!!, Nov. 3 2006
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Maxine Mccurdy (Toronto Canada) - See all my reviews
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I originally bought this book on "accident" at a used book store. Something to read that looked interesting... once I had picked it up I COULDNT put it down. It really makes you want to know what happens on the next page. I was disappointed when it was over... I didn’t realize that it was the first(I cant believe my luck) of many. And the thing is every book that comes after it is just as good... i find myself reading until the wee hours of the morning EVERY time i pick up one of these books. They are Defiantly my new favorite series. And if you like fantasy at all you should at least try the first one. I don’t think you will be disappointed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars First Person Narration Very Interesting, Feb. 23 2004
By 
J. Granville (Denver, Colorado, United States of America) - See all my reviews
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In The Magic of Recluce, by L.E. Modesitt, Jr., there was one startling thing about how it was written that certainly shocked me at first, and for good reason. This was that it was all written in the first person narrative style. A long while ago, I had read another book in the first person style, and I thought it was great. The Magic of Recluce certainly does not disappoint. It is a great book that I highly enjoyed, and I think that Modesitt is a great writer, and the first person narration only adds to that. It not only put you right in the action by putting you behind the character's senses and feelings but also gave you a far more intimate knowledge of the character than even third person omniscient is capable of. That was truly a defining feature of the book, and I highly enjoyed reading that. In fact, I probably would have enjoyed reading the book had the plot been junk but the first person narration was kept firmly intact. Further, it was something unique in a rather run-of-the-mill time for the excellent genre of fantasy. It was finally something different, both in its great plot and its superb use of the first person style of writing. All things considered, the book was excellent on its own rights, and Modesitt did a great job making use of a unique and often overlooked literary device in excellent ways. A wonderful start to what should be an excellent series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars First Person Narration Very Interesting, Feb. 23 2004
By 
J. Granville (Denver, Colorado, United States of America) - See all my reviews
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In The Towers of the Sunset by L.E. Modesitt, Jr., there was one thing that really leapt out at me from the absolute beginning: the book was written in the present tense. Obviously, my first reaction was one of confusion. It was strange seeing a book written so after I had been so long reading traditional novels in the past tense. It kept throwing me off to be reading it like that for the first twenty-five pages or so. But soon I developed a keen liking for it. I thought that using the present tense made the book much more exciting, putting you in the action instead of making the reader a bored spectator to the book. I truly admire Modesitt for going out on a limb like this. I think that it takes a lot of guts for an author to do something like this, especially in today's overly confined and narrow-minded society. Also, it did a great job of making this book stand out above all others. I read this book a while ago, but it's still vivid in my memory due to its radical and noteworthy style of writing. Chances are that I will remember this book for years to come, both as the absolutely excellent narrative that it was and the exquisite and daring foray into the present tense. Overall, this was a truly excellent book that I would recommend without any hesitation.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Charmed, again., Dec 1 2003
I picked up this book 11 years ago (1992) after having read most of TSRs Dragonlance and Forgotten Realms offerings. It was not what I expected. Unevenly paced, but compelling and real, this novel drew me along and helped me deal with some of my real life issues.
Although I lost track of the series after the second volume (so many books so little time) I had such fond memories that I read it again (2003), and still found it enjoyable, with some caveats:
- As other reviewers have mentioned, Modesitt spreads onomatopoeia a little too thick.
- In places the grammar is so bad that it interrupts the flow of the story, though that may be evidence of a clumsy editor and not the fault of this seasoned author.

- When he deals with secondary characters' plotlines he shifts entirely out of the story's first person past tense mode into third person present tense - very distracting to some readers.
- Although large portions of the book are devoted to describing woodwork there are only three woods mentioned in the book: lorken, oak and pine. Of these three only one is ever used as a building material. That's just plain sloppy research, unless I'm missing some deeper symbolism in his use of three colours of oak: white, red and black...
- Some portions of the book appear to have been "cut and pasted", with identical descriptive passages appearing in several different contexts.
The book's emphasis on independent thought, hard work, and honesty, and its exploration of themes of the balance between order and chaos, and good and evil make it an excellent coming of age story.
Strongly recommended for readers aged 16-20.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Best, June 17 2003
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This book explores so many different aspects of Nodesitts world it isnt funny some would think the book is slow but in reality he is just trying to clrify everything. So in hte end if you are up for a captavating book that will hook you into another series give it a try.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A promising but slow start on an epic series, May 6 2003
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C. Campagna "apocalyptic hunter" (Montreal, Quebec Canada) - See all my reviews
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When the real action starts only at the 400th page or so, you know that all the pages before that are about fleshing out the characters. This novel is not a fantasy novel like the others.
First, if you don't like to read about woodworking techniques, forget this book. Even so, Modesitt order theory had to start somewhere. You should have seen my carpenter friend when I explained to him why the wood grains of his cabinet were not ordered.
I would have like the author to explain more what is happening when Lerris manipulate order forces. He creates shields and increase order but how is that achieved in physical terms? I guess it is more detailed in the sequel which I started reading yesterday.
You can see that Modesitt has thought hard about what makes this world works and with more that 8 books following this one, I am sure he has no shortage of imagination.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Original!, March 12 2003
By 
Pro - original magic system. Order vs. Chaos and how those two "powers" exist with one another
Con - every now and again the author switches tenses with certain characters which throws off the flow of the story. Like feeling a spider crawling on you and you brush it away because it is irritating but you still have some chills and goosebumps afterwards. Meaning it is liveable but you don't want to feel it again. This I've read is the biggest complaint with book 2...so I'm going to avoid that book
Pro - I didn't know what to expect...just as the main character doesn't have a "real" clue as to what he is to do next, neither did I as the reader. This was handled well, kept the suspense and kept me guessing
Con - Like others have mentioned the emulating of sounds got old. At first it was funny, then cute, then irritating, then I just ignored the sounds because it was boring.
Pro - I didn't want the story to end!! Story, characters, and the world created were all very enjoyable. Can't ask for much more than that.
Pro -
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3.0 out of 5 stars The discription and art is the only magic here, Jan. 8 2003
It was the cover art that first caught my eye, it was beautiful. This book is very descriptive but at the same time it can also be very boring. This is not the stories fault no, not by any means the story itself is in depth and descriptive. I loved the story when I finally found the time to finish it.
My main complant is about the main character "Lerris" I found him to be an annoying dork. This again is not his fault I probably would be as boring as Lerris had I grown up in a land as self righteous as Recluce.
It seemed to me like whenever the story threatened to pick up speed or become interesting such as the conflict between the White wizards and the Grey Wizards Lerris would start whining about how bored he was with everything. We have to endure 300 pages of him listening impatiently to his teachers. I mean if he can do it better then everyone else why doesn't he shut up and movie the story along.
My Impression-The story is good and other books in this serise are indeed excellent(I started I reverse order) but if I have to deal with "Lerris" for another book I think I will skip "towers at sunset". The Villians were fleshed out and all charecter were taken as far as they could go. It was refeshing to see a practical approach to magic
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5.0 out of 5 stars For those with eyes to see., Dec 31 2002
By 
R. V. Prooyen "qx" (South Melbourne, Victoria Australia) - See all my reviews
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Okay,this could be one of Modesitt's most captivating and thoughtful works since "The Ecolitan Operation". I don't usually pick up books with castles, horses and swordsmen on the cover, but this one correctly uses those archetypes as the vehicle for exploring the realm of mental potential; even today, in the third millenium.
Not much swashbuckling there for those who have no eyes to see with yet, but the work is an absolute relief and a chilling wake-up call for those who have real questions. ;o) A handbook for operating the mind. Sort of reminds me of Roger Zelazny's lessons with his Hell-Rides through chaos, although more detailed, this ride is real. Fine job, Order-Master Modesitt. I've sent for "The Towers of Sunset".
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4.0 out of 5 stars Slow start, marvelous finish, Dec 31 2002
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First off, let me just say that it took me 3 tries to finish this book all because of the really slow beginning. The first 100 pages or so is a lot of background info on the setting and main characters of the novel. But once you get through this part and understand how the world of Recluce revolves around black and white magic, the action begins and the book turns into a very interesting read. Lots of action and suspense. It kind of reminds me of how you feel when you're playing a really good rpg game. Overall a good adventure for those who are patient with the slow beginning.
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The Magic of Recluce
The Magic of Recluce by L. E. Modesitt (Library Binding - June 12 2008)
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