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4.0 out of 5 stars The Brooklyn Bridge, Over and Over Again
In his introduction to this collection, Stephen King recalls being a credulous youngster who believed all sorts of things--from the reality of Santa Claus to Richard Nixon's plan to get the country out of Vietnam. He is still like this, and willingly accepts the recurring disappointments in exchange for the ability to believe in a story and bring it to life. In this...
Published 17 months ago by John M. Ford

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3.0 out of 5 stars Hit or Miss
If you're a King fan, I'd read this pretty good collection of short stories. A few stories are amazing (Umney's Last Case, Crouch End, and Dolan's Cadillac to name a few), and most of them are okay-good.
There are, however, a few that made me laugh out loud at the sheer idiocy. For example: "Rainy Season," a ludicrous story about giant, fanged toads falling...
Published on May 20 2004 by Denny Gibbons


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4.0 out of 5 stars The Brooklyn Bridge, Over and Over Again, Feb. 20 2013
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
In his introduction to this collection, Stephen King recalls being a credulous youngster who believed all sorts of things--from the reality of Santa Claus to Richard Nixon's plan to get the country out of Vietnam. He is still like this, and willingly accepts the recurring disappointments in exchange for the ability to believe in a story and bring it to life. In this collection, his third following Night Shift and Skeleton Crew, King believes into existence twenty-two stories--and one nonfiction piece--intended to scare the reader "...so badly you won't be able to go to sleep without leaving the bathroom light on." Some of them deliver all too well.

Three of my favorites:

In "Dolan's Cadillac" we live through years of obsessive investigation and planning for revenge. A man traps the mob boss who ordered his wife's death and systematically covers up all evidence of his crime. Perfect.

If you could remove mankind's violent tendencies and bring about "The End of the Whole Mess" of murder and war, you would do it, right? Even if it wasn't the smartest thing to do.

In "Suffer the Little Children" we meet Miss Sidley, a teacher who has been taking care of children all of her adult life. One day her students begin acting strangely...so she takes care of them.

This book is highly recommended for Stephen King fans and readers who enjoy a well-crafted story that makes their brains squirm for a day or two after reading.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A collection of some of King's best short fiction., July 6 2004
NIGHTMARES & DREAMSCAPES is a collection of some odd, eclectic short fiction, showcasing Stephen King at his macabre best.
In "Dolan's Cadillac," a man gets revenge for his murdered wife...through hard labor and ingenious thinking. "Suffer the Little Children" is a tale for every child who had an insufferable teacher, and wanted to do something about it."The Night Flier" is a tale of obsession that leads to the ultimate horror. In "Popsy," a young boy is kidnapped...but his grandfather is on his trail, and has a few surprises up his cape. "The Moving Finger" is a macabre tale of madness...or the utmost sanity. In "You Know They Got a Hell of a Band," a young couple is about to attend an amazing rock concert...which may last for the rest of eternity. "The Ten O'Clock People" tells of two societies who live beneath normal human radar; one is benevolent, while the other is bent on world domination. "Crouch End" and "The Doctor's Case" are great examples of British fiction by an American, the latter about Sherlock Holmes. In the fantisful "The House on Maple Street," four children are about to unlock the secrets of their home. "Umney's Last Case" is a bizarre crime-noir, about the power an author has over his story, and vice versa. "Head Down" is an enchanting essay about kids and baseball.
NIGHTMARES & DREAMSCAPES. Stephen King. Need I say any more than that? A wonderful, intriquing, and entertaining collection, this book is guaranteed to occupy a welcomed place on your bookshelf. This collection goes to show why Stephen King is one of contemporary literature's best writers.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Hit or Miss, May 20 2004
By 
Denny Gibbons (Champaign, IL USA) - See all my reviews
If you're a King fan, I'd read this pretty good collection of short stories. A few stories are amazing (Umney's Last Case, Crouch End, and Dolan's Cadillac to name a few), and most of them are okay-good.
There are, however, a few that made me laugh out loud at the sheer idiocy. For example: "Rainy Season," a ludicrous story about giant, fanged toads falling out of the sky and attacking a young couple summering in a remote town; "My Pretty Pony," which is not horror or interesting at all, about some old grandfather imparting some incredibly boring wisdom on to his unfortunate grandson; and "Chattering Teeth," about a man who is saved from a homicidal hitch hiker by a pair of possessed wind-up teeth.
All in all, however, a good book and a must-read for any King fan.
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4.0 out of 5 stars King's stories provide both chills and grins, Sept. 11 2003
By 
Beth Cholette "doctor_beth" (Upstate NY USA) - See all my reviews
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This collection of stories is typical King--you may not like every single one, but you're sure to find at least one that scares you and one that makes you laugh. My favorite was "Dolan's Cadillac," a chilling tale of painstakingly-plotted revenge. Also intriguing is "The 10 O'Clock People," a must-read for every smoker who has cut back but who just can't seem to quit completely. In "Sorry, Right Number," King tries something new by writing the story in screenplay fashion; the gimmick doesn't necessarily add anything, but the plot itself is engaging nonetheless. On the scary side, l found "Night Flier" to be extremely creepy--the final scene will definitely make you want to sleep with the lights on!--and for a more light-hearted offering, there's "Clattery Teeth." Each story here is likely to have its fans; you'll have to read them all to find your own favorite.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Combination of Short Stories, Sept. 11 2003
By 
Amanda Wright (Kentucky, USA) - See all my reviews
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I recommend this to anyone out there who love steven king and/or short stories. this is an excelent collection!
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4.0 out of 5 stars crimehorrordrama, May 15 2003
i like SK particularly as a short story writer. if he has a good story he never fails then. considering his other collections, this was not as inventive as the two previous. not as matheson-like as the first. this was a great collection. a bit mixed. the end of the whole mess and umney's last case seemed to be the most inventive ones. but his other horror stories were good too. there are even some crime stories here, they are actually pretty good. although SK delivers, his collection is all in all very readworthy, his writing style good, this collection marks the sad decline of SK. some of the stories are great, true. some of the stories, however, are only good in the hands of a master. and some of the stories are completely uninteresting. it's very enjoyable, but don't expect too much.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great for teens, Dec 18 2002
By 
Aaron Marks (Oakland, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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I'm not a big Stephen King fan but Nightmares & Dreamscapes is quite good. I worked for three years as a summer camp counselor and when you have a group of 15 year old boys, they don't want to hear cheesy ghost stories or little kid stories. I read them a few of King's short stories and they LOVED them. While his Novels tend to drone on a bit too much for my taste, his short stories are just right. Some of the ones in this book are better than others, but they're all pretty good. I actually think the stories in "Night Shift" are a little better, but both books are excellent.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Master Speaks, Dec 9 2002
By A Customer
Good old fashioned horror, and when the master speaks we listen. I dug into a used copy of this after finishing "Night of the Beast," Harry Shannon's rollicking, behind-kicking pulp horror novel (the best of 2002 IMHO) and loved every story. "Dolan's Caddilac" alone is worth the price of admission. Wish King's later novels were half this good.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Something For Everyone, Sept. 28 2002
By 
sweetmolly (RICHMOND, VA USA) - See all my reviews
At 692 pages, "Nightmares & Dreamscapes" is a doorstopper of a book. I planned to read it a story at a time over a period of weeks, but as usual got hooked on King and read it straight through, right from his usual folksy introduction (each of which I am sure he writes solely for me!) to the charming little moral folktale tacked on at the end. The stories are to say the least, diverse. I would call this collection "King's Scrapbook."
"Dolan's Cadillac" highly regarded by most Amazon reviewers is very hard tech for King. Interestingly, he says in his notes that technical stuff bores him, but it had to be done for this story. I have no more interest than he does in the proper "arc of descent;" I would have been just as mindlessly satisfied if he had shot the Cadillac out of a cannon, so it's not one of my favorites.
"Clattery Teeth" I just know SK had a hoot of a time writing it. He lovingly sets the scene and characters and then puts them at the mercy of a set of not-so-funny joke teeth (that wear spats). It's 80 degrees more grotesque than the "Young Frankenstein," and I felt guilty for laughing.
"The Moving Finger" Mr. Mitla is the perfectly normal man living a perfectly normal life when one morning he goes into his bathroom, and a finger is emerging from his bathroom sink drain and tapping on the porcelain. No one can see this finger except Mr. Mitla, and he slowly goes bonkers and his entire life is in a shambles. Unlike "Clattery Teeth" this one is terrifying. See for yourself.
"My Pretty Pony" though highly acclaimed, didn't much interest me UNTIL I read in Notes that the exquisitely sensitive little boy, Clive Banning, grew up to be a hardened killer in an unpublished Richard Bachman novel. We leave Clive at 7-years old in the Pony story.
"The House on Maple Street" delighted me because children are empowered and the bad guy gets his just desserts in a most explosive fashion. I was all-around satisfied.
"Umley's Last Case" is my favorite. SK takes a spin in Raymond Chandler land. He sets the scene meticulously and the characters are perfect. I was reminded of Nathaniel West's "Day of the Locust." Then things start going askew in a very King-like way. What if the author of P.I. books decided he liked the detective's life better than his own, and decided to swap places? What would happen? Would it be too far out if the detective who has never lived outside a book set in the 1930's had to spend a week toilet training himself? (Characters in hard-boiled novels never have to go to the bathroom.)
There are 20 stories in "Nightmares & Dreamscapes." It is not as brilliantly crafted as "Everything's Eventual" nor is it as well organized as "Skeleton Crew" and "Night Shift." I don't think many readers will like ALL of the stories, but there are such a variety, that most of the readers will like SOME of the stories, and some will like MOST of the stories. Chances are everyone will find one or two that will stay with them forever.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent short stories, Aug. 16 2002
This is a very, very good collection. It ranges from the macabre to the heartfelt, from the scary to the puzzling.
There is something for everyone here, lovers of non-fiction and baseball will love "Head Down" a great little non-fiction "essay" on Little League. Admittedly, i wasn't very interested in it so skimmed it, but it's an incredibly enjoyable piece of writing, very very well written, and at times touching.
If detective novels are your thing, you'll love "The Doctor's Case" a short story about Holmes and Watson, where it is Watson who cracks the crime, not Holmes.
Then there is the rather strange story, Sorry, Right NUmber, which is not told conventionally, more in the style of a TV script, but it's another very clever story that is very enjoyable.
And you of course then have the typical horror stories, such as Chattery Teeth and The Moving Finger. Then there are more "message" stories, such as My Pretty Pony.
King's variety is remarkable. Every story touches on a different element, but they all have something in common: The fact that they are all immensely enjoyable and well written. Once again, his notes at the end make the book even more special. My personal favourites of this colelction are Chattery Teeth and The House on Maple Street.
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Nightmares and Dreamscapes
Nightmares and Dreamscapes by Stephen King (Paperback - Jan. 1 2012)
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