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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You must read this book
If you only read one memoir this year, make it A House in the Sky by Amanda Lindhout and Sara Corbett.

Amanda Lindhout is from Alberta, Canada. As a young child living in a turbulent household, she collected and cashed in bottles. And what did she spend her money on? Old National Geographic magazines. Amanda escaped into the pages,dreaming of one day visiting...
Published 12 months ago by Luanne Ollivier

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Yawn
While I found the basis of the story touching, and something which should be shared in order to recognize and rectify issues in countries such as Somalia, which are battling with unstable governments and militia forces, I found Amanda's book to be quite boring at times. There were only a few moments in which I felt eager to continue reading, but otherwise, I had to drag...
Published 5 months ago by Tori Turner


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You must read this book, Sept. 17 2013
By 
Luanne Ollivier - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)   
If you only read one memoir this year, make it A House in the Sky by Amanda Lindhout and Sara Corbett.

Amanda Lindhout is from Alberta, Canada. As a young child living in a turbulent household, she collected and cashed in bottles. And what did she spend her money on? Old National Geographic magazines. Amanda escaped into the pages,dreaming of one day visiting the exotic places pictured.

At nineteen she has saved enough money from waitressing to make those dreams a reality. Her first trip abroad is to Venezuela.

"I had seen this place in the magazine, and now we were here, lost in it. It was a small truth affirmed. And it was all I needed to keep going."

Lindhout repeats the cycle, earning, then travelling. She visits most of Latin America, India, Burma, Ethiopia, Syria, Pakistan, Sudan and dozens more. Her joy in exploring and experiencing new places and people is tangible. But, each trip she takes is a little further off the beaten path. And finally, she's travelling to some of the most war torn countries in the world.

In Kabul, Afghanistan she begins a career as a fledgling freelance /journalist/photojournalist - with no formal training, associations or contacts. With some success under her belt, she heads next to Baghdad, Iraq to work as a reporter for Iran's Press TV. Moving on from there she decides to head to Mogadishu, Somalia in 2008 - bigger stories might help her career take off faster. She wonders if an old flame, Nigel Brennan, an Aussie photographer wants to join her. He does.......and four days after their arrival in Somalia, they are kidnapped by insurgents from an Islamic fundamentalist group. And, they are held.... for 460 days.

"It was here, finally, that I started to believe this story would be one I'd never get to tell, that I would become an erasure, an eddy in a river pulled suddenly flat. I began to feel certain that, hidden inside Somalia, inside this unknowable and stricken place, we would never be found."

A House in the Sky is Amanda's recounting of those 460 days. She is beaten, starved, chained up, kept in the dark, raped and tortured. These are the facts.

"There are parts of my story that I may one day be able to recover and heal from, and, to whatever degree possible, forget about them and move on. But there are parts of my story that are so horrific that once they are shared, other people's minds will keep them alive."

How she survives is a story that had me tearing up, putting the book down and walking away from it so many times. It's a difficult read, but is such a testament to the human spirit and will.

Amanda names each of the houses they are held in - Bomb-Making House, Electric House, Tacky House and more. But it is the House in the Sky that had me freely sobbing - at the worst of times she builds a house in her mind, filled with the people she loves and the memories she treasures, the future she dreams of.

"I was safe and protected. It was where all the voices that normally tore through my head expressing fear and wishing for death went silent, until there was only one left speaking . It was a calmer, stronger voice, one that to me felt divine. It said, 'See? You are okay, Amanda. It's only your body that's suffering, and you are not your body. The rest of you is fine.' "

The journey to their release is gut-wrenching, incredibly powerful and impossible to put down. I stopped many times to look at the smiling author picture of Amanda on the back, wondering how in the world she survived. Survived and forgave. And as I turned the last page, I just sat. Sat and thought. This is a book that will stay with you, long after that last page. Read an excerpt of A House in the Sky.

Amanda Lindhout is the founder of the Global Enrichment Foundation - "a non -profit organization that supports development, aid and education initiatives in Somalia and Kenya
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulously written account, Sept. 7 2013
By 
J. Jenkins (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A House in the Sky (Hardcover)
I had been following the story of Amanda since the initial kidnapping in Somalia many years ago and the ordeals she was forced to undergo as dimly reported in national newspapers. It was horrifyingly fascinating due to, what we must admit to straightaway, the great physical beauty of Amanda, and the desolation of being captive in Somalia, said to be the most dangerous place on earth, which even aid groups like medecins sans frontiers had abandoned. Equally shocking was the idea that ordinary folks (her family) would have to raise a million dollars as ransom without the help of government or she would be killed. So I definitely jumped on the book when I saw it was finally out because I wanted to hear 'her side' of this big news story, especially the big question: why be so foolish to travel into Somalia? And how bad did it get, really?

The book does a great job of explaining her motivations, based on her free-spirited backpacker days obsessed with travel and seeing the world (and in fact these early chapters are really beautiful for those who like me are highly interested in travel too), thereafter the appeal of freelance journalism arises to fund her travels, which, due to its lack of success in for ex. Baghdad, led to the idea of venturing into Somalia which was underrepresented in journalism for obvious reasons.

Equally powerful is the understanding she brings both to her situation, her self-awareness of the mistake she had made, the situation inside Somalia, and the islamicism of her captors combined with their immaturity (mostly teenagers) and the absolutely soul-breaking experience of being captive for 15 months, thinking so often that death was a minute away.

What was a pleasant surprise to me was how beautifully well-written the book was. There is little of the purple prose or wallowing in emotional discharges that could have drowned such a memoir, everything is actually very lightly but beautifully described no matter the intensity of the feelings. Several pages I reread due to their great literary beauty.

Of course, the fact that her soul didn't break, she continued to have hope in the goodnesss of people, will make this book highly appealing to the general public. For myself I'm thankful I came to understand the reasons behind the bizarreness of this experience and entered fully into the mind of such a kidnap victim, made worse by the fact she was a female in a house full of teenage males, and experiences that are so extreme it's hard to believe they really happened.

It was so well-written truly I couldn't put it down when I started it and stayed awake until the early hours to finish it. The narrative is like a runaway train in its momentum, each time something happens you can't wait to see what happens next. I've never read a book that deserved more to be made into a movie.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Stumbles and Strengths of One Woman, Oct. 16 2013
By 
Cheryl Schenk (Alberta, Canada) - See all my reviews
This book was an eye opener. It led me into places I have never seen and most certainly do not understand.

I commend Ms. Lindhout on leading us through the drama and terror of her days and months of confinement, in her attempt to help us understand her adventurous spirit and the situation she found herself in. Though I often questioned her naivety and the decisions to put herself in harms way, I applaud her bravery and reasoning during her captivity.

Fear, anger, sadness, and horror, my emotions were tripping over each other as I turned the pages of this memoir.

I would recommend this book, if for no other reason, than to better understand the world we live in and what is happening out there, and how vulnerable we can be when we intrude into the lives of others who see us through very different eyes.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read, Nov. 1 2013
This review is from: A House in the Sky (Hardcover)
Having lived in Red Deer, AB during this time, I followed Amanda's story closely, wishing and praying for her quick release. That's not to say there weren't doubts as the longer it dragged on, the less likely it appeared she would be freed. But to see how the community came together to raise funds for her release was heartwarming.

I found her book to be very well written and very blunt. I found myself gasping to catch my breath as she and Nigel made their escape; running through the streets of godknowswhere, hoping to reach freedom. How she endured being held captive for that long is truly amazing. It shows her character and resiliency in making a bad situation bearable.

It truly is a book you'll find hard to put down once you start it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read - A Compelling Story, Oct. 7 2013
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Amanda's writing makes this read - dare I say - enjoyable. I realize that sounds odd, given the subject matter, but it is true. She is candid and transparent. I followed the situation while Amanda and Nigel were in captivity, growing more anxious as the days went by. I prayed for her and worried about her. Reading her story helped me understand what she went through and gives me tremendous respect for the work she is doing now.
I hope she will write more!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Our spiritual nature, Sept. 27 2013
By 
Dan S. Johnston (Alberta, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: A House in the Sky (Hardcover)
I initially had a lot of judgement toward Amanda, going into such a dangerous place. If it was so dangerous for American soldiers (Blackhawk Down), what on earth was an attractive, Western, white woman thinking when going into Somalia? I would have the same judgement on anyone going into such a place - man or woman.

My initial curiosity in her book however had to do with talk of her out of body experience. I wanted to know more about that.

What I hadn't counted on was her powerful, instinctive drive to purposely manage her survival and give herself a future, from within her own mind. Very powerful. Many people would simply have given up and taken their own life to get out of their circumstance. And she certainly had her opportunities. This speaks to the great strength of our spiritual nature that we rarely associate with.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very timely, Oct. 8 2013
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This review is from: A House in the Sky (Hardcover)
It was eerie how soon after I read the book that the terrorist group raided the mall in Nairobi. I thought how very very fortunate she was not to have been handed over to Al Shabaab. I hope a lot of people read this book to help awake them to the very real threat of Islam No matter how much you want to dress it up, the Koran does say to kill the infidel.
I don't think she should castigate herself for her choices, How is she different than any of the great explorers of the past.
I truly loved the book. I hope it is advertised well as I think everyone in Canada should read it. I hope I can meet her some day.$500 one night in tips. Wow.
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4.0 out of 5 stars More Bookish Thoughts..., Aug. 20 2014
By 
Reader Writer Runner (Victoria, BC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: A House in the Sky (Hardcover)
Dark, dank spaces haunt Amanda Lindhout. As a child in small-town Alberta, she lived in a squalid basement apartment where her mother often suffered beatings at the hands of her boyfriend. With pocket change procured from collecting bottles, Lindhout found escape perusing copies of National Geographic she bought from the local thrift shop and dreaming of seeing exotic destinations. Years later, after much travel, Lindhout found herself incarcerated in another nightmarish room, this one in Somalia. "A House in the Sky" recounts her harrowing, 15-month captivity filled with beatings, rape and torture. It proves an extremely difficult and emotional read, but one that ultimately rewards its audience with wisdom and hope.

With talented wordsmith Sara Corbett, Lindhout has released a clear and powerful memoir. Though parts of the first 100 pages contain youthful platitudes and tedious biographical information, the story goes great guns when Lindhout turns 19. Most fascinating may be her description of the mental strategies she used to cope during her imprisonment and her elucidation of the dynamics between herself, Brennan, and their teenaged jihadist guards. After converting to Islam with hopes of receiving better treatment, she and Brennan were physically separated and Lindhout deeply resented the fact that Brennan, as a man, had greater freedom while she was left shackled in a windowless room.

A chapter describing Lindhout and Brennan’s bold, Shawshank Redemption-style escape leaves the reader breathless but even more profound is Lindhout's post-trauma mindset. She has managed to forgive her captors and considers the dire circumstances faced by millions of Somalis the story’s real tragedy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars House in the Sky, Sept. 11 2014
The start of the book was a bit slow.

But once the author started her travels it became very interesting - the dangers, the discomforts, the courage for a woman to go on such a venture - and yes, also the
beauty and intrigue of the places she had visited. Was very informative about the various countries she visited and the people she met.

The book was spellbinding and gripping. Hard to put down. Had much admiration for the author's deportment and courage and attitude through all her tribulations, distress and
deprivation she was subjected to.

Elizabeth
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Yawn, April 20 2014
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This review is from: A House in the Sky (Hardcover)
While I found the basis of the story touching, and something which should be shared in order to recognize and rectify issues in countries such as Somalia, which are battling with unstable governments and militia forces, I found Amanda's book to be quite boring at times. There were only a few moments in which I felt eager to continue reading, but otherwise, I had to drag myself through the novel, and found myself doing a quick read over a page just to reach the end of the book. I am happy both Amanda and Nigel are safe, and my heart goes out to the women living in such poor conditions.
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A House in the Sky
A House in the Sky by Sara Corbett (Hardcover - Sept. 3 2013)
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