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on November 27, 2010
Research is Ceremony is a good overview of applying Indigenous Methodologies. An Indigenous Methodology can use the standard formats; what makes it Indigenous is the way in which it is used and interpreted when applied. Some may criticise, seeking some "alternative" way. Sorry, no magic bullets here. This is a straight up reflection on how research can be done in a way that is relective of Indigenous values and value systems.
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on February 8, 2014
G. Hurley's previous review states "The author explicitly states that he believes that he no longer needs to justify "indigenous research methods" to the "dominant system". Instead, the book seems devoted to outlining an ideology without explaining why anyone else should believe it. " The author's first sentence explains the second sentence, but Ms. Hurley fails to acknowledge this. The author is writing for people who already believe there should be indigenous methods already, not for those (probably from dominant European backgrounds) who must be persuaded. This is a legitimate choice. Indigenous-oriented authors should not have to spend their scarce writing time and space accounting for themselves to those with other perspectives, but should be able to discuss possible perspectives with members of their own research community.
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on August 21, 2014
A fantastic read for anyone interested in doing research within an Indigenous paradigm.
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on April 29, 2016
This book merely puts into words what I have been offering to educational institutions for many years. It gives an understanding of Traditional Indigenous Oral Knowledge and its place in the educational system. This system of knowledge and the accumulation of it far transcends the research and accessibility of merely being labelled and credentialed as a PHD mainly because it is knowledge achieved through many years of life and living and is holistically gathered in the form of songs, spiritual works, language, ceremonies, customs, protocols, worldview, etc.
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on May 24, 2015
A thoughtful book developing an Indigenous methodology and research paradigm. Based on relationships and responsibility to relationships, community co-developed research and centred in Indigenous cultures. Thought-provoking and interesting. My qualms come with the question of how I, or anyone not living in a close-knit community with common ethnic and linguistic reference points - in other words, any urban person, could fully apply this method.
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on December 3, 2015
Generous content, caring research stories, thoughtful form, and interdisciplinary-research applicable methods. I was excited to share Shawn Wilson's Research as Ceremony book with other graduate students at university. Thank you.
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on April 19, 2015
Great condition, excellent text
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on November 14, 2010
I am not quite sure what the purpose of this book is. The author explicitly states that he believes that he no longer needs to justify "indigenous research methods" to the "dominant system". Instead, the book seems devoted to outlining an ideology without explaining why anyone else should believe it. There is no explanation of the advantages that indigenous research methods might bring.

The entire methodolgy, says Shawn Wilson, is based on the idea that "there is no one definite reality but rather different sets of relationships that make up Indigenous ontology" (73). Despite the fact that he realises that this is a controversial statement, he does not justify, defend, or attempt to prove this statement in any way. Indeed, the very fact that he is making a singular pronnouncement about reality (that there are, in reality, multiple realities) betrays his argument.

Even the book's title is misleading. There is not a single research method espoused in the entire book. What are social research methods? Surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc. Shawn Wilson does not introduce any 'new' research methods that could be used as alternatives to these methods offered by what he calls the "dominant system". All he offers is unsubstantiated ad-hoc theorizing.
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