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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good addition to the discussion of Indigenous Peoples Methodologies
Research is Ceremony is a good overview of applying Indigenous Methodologies. An Indigenous Methodology can use the standard formats; what makes it Indigenous is the way in which it is used and interpreted when applied. Some may criticise, seeking some "alternative" way. Sorry, no magic bullets here. This is a straight up reflection on how research can be done in a...
Published on Nov. 27 2010 by Michael J. Lane

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4 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self-refuting, confused, and meaningless
I am not quite sure what the purpose of this book is. The author explicitly states that he believes that he no longer needs to justify "indigenous research methods" to the "dominant system". Instead, the book seems devoted to outlining an ideology without explaining why anyone else should believe it. There is no explanation of the advantages that indigenous research...
Published on Nov. 14 2010 by Gabriel Hurley


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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good addition to the discussion of Indigenous Peoples Methodologies, Nov. 27 2010
By 
Michael J. Lane (Olympia Washington) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods (Paperback)
Research is Ceremony is a good overview of applying Indigenous Methodologies. An Indigenous Methodology can use the standard formats; what makes it Indigenous is the way in which it is used and interpreted when applied. Some may criticise, seeking some "alternative" way. Sorry, no magic bullets here. This is a straight up reflection on how research can be done in a way that is relective of Indigenous values and value systems.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Previous review dominant group perspective, Feb. 8 2014
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Jennifer Bankier (Halifax, Nova Scotia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods (Paperback)
G. Hurley's previous review states "The author explicitly states that he believes that he no longer needs to justify "indigenous research methods" to the "dominant system". Instead, the book seems devoted to outlining an ideology without explaining why anyone else should believe it. " The author's first sentence explains the second sentence, but Ms. Hurley fails to acknowledge this. The author is writing for people who already believe there should be indigenous methods already, not for those (probably from dominant European backgrounds) who must be persuaded. This is a legitimate choice. Indigenous-oriented authors should not have to spend their scarce writing time and space accounting for themselves to those with other perspectives, but should be able to discuss possible perspectives with members of their own research community.
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4 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Self-refuting, confused, and meaningless, Nov. 14 2010
This review is from: Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods (Paperback)
I am not quite sure what the purpose of this book is. The author explicitly states that he believes that he no longer needs to justify "indigenous research methods" to the "dominant system". Instead, the book seems devoted to outlining an ideology without explaining why anyone else should believe it. There is no explanation of the advantages that indigenous research methods might bring.

The entire methodolgy, says Shawn Wilson, is based on the idea that "there is no one definite reality but rather different sets of relationships that make up Indigenous ontology" (73). Despite the fact that he realises that this is a controversial statement, he does not justify, defend, or attempt to prove this statement in any way. Indeed, the very fact that he is making a singular pronnouncement about reality (that there are, in reality, multiple realities) betrays his argument.

Even the book's title is misleading. There is not a single research method espoused in the entire book. What are social research methods? Surveys, interviews, focus groups, etc. Shawn Wilson does not introduce any 'new' research methods that could be used as alternatives to these methods offered by what he calls the "dominant system". All he offers is unsubstantiated ad-hoc theorizing.
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Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods
Research Is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods by Shawn Wilson (Paperback - April 1 2009)
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