Customer Reviews


71 Reviews
5 star:
 (61)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Full-bodied recreation of the 14th century BC Egypt
The Egyptian set in the Amarna period of Ancient Egypt during the reigns of the pharaohs Amunhotep III, Akhenaten and Horemheb, covering the concluding years of the 18th dynasty of the New Kingdom (1386 - 1293 BC), an ear in Egyptian history that was marked by significant religious and political upheaval. The Egyptian is Sinuhe, a physician of unknown birth origin who was...
Published on April 18 2004 by Matthew M. Yau

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Sinuhe's story
Although this book is supposed to be one of the best books ever written by a Finn, I don't really go along with this. It's definately not a book for "all ages", more like for people ages 40->. Me, being 15, reading the book at 13, found it good but a little bit too long-winded. True, once you start you can't stop, but you won't get a good feeling after...
Published on Feb. 27 2000 by Jenni


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Full-bodied recreation of the 14th century BC Egypt, April 18 2004
By 
Matthew M. Yau "Voracious reader" (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
The Egyptian set in the Amarna period of Ancient Egypt during the reigns of the pharaohs Amunhotep III, Akhenaten and Horemheb, covering the concluding years of the 18th dynasty of the New Kingdom (1386 - 1293 BC), an ear in Egyptian history that was marked by significant religious and political upheaval. The Egyptian is Sinuhe, a physician of unknown birth origin who was wrapped and cradled in a reed boat floating down the Nile. As he narrates his life story, which transcended years of warfare, plague, and fierce battle between gods. On the outside The Egyptian delineates the history of Egypt through its inveterate religious devotion to many gods. At the core of the novel finds one man's lifelong journey through many countries, like Babylon, Crete, and Mitannia, to knowledge. Sinehu possessed such lonely idealism that motivated him to devote his life searching for something so intangible yet greater than he beyond his understanding did. He was not ready to merely worshipping the gods - in fact, he insisted on questioning traditions and thus marked him as an outsider of his own culture.
The spine of the novel concerns the ferocious contention between Aton and the Ammon. Pharoach Akhenaten sought to disestablish the old gods with a relatively unknown deity called the Aton as the Ammon, the present godly sponsor, had accumulated so much wealth and power that the Ammon priests began to rival to that of the Pharoach. In order to achieve balance of power between Ammon and the throne, Akhenaten deposed the ancient gods and established Aton as a new state divinity. No sooner had Akhenaten adopted the new deity than Sinuhe ineluctably became entangled in conflict between tradition and innovation. Sinuhe must choose between the way of the heretic Pharoach and the old corrupt system that had blinded many and robbed the freedom of Egyptians.
Miki Waltari deftly uses a prose style evocative of ancient texts that is comparable to Naguib Mahfouz's work in modern Egyptian literature. Unlike Mahfouz, Waltari's book is the first major novel set in ancient Egypt during the 18th dynasty of the New Kingdom in 14th century BC The Egyptian, comibing history, research and imagination, is a timeless re-creation of such largely forgotten era over a prodigious interval of time. The book captures the nuances of war, intrigue, power struggle, wassail, romance, horror, and lavish scnenes of violence. From Sinuhe's intransigence to worshipping false gods springs forth a tale of death and love, man's corruption, cruelty, and lust for power and the warfare between two value systems and religions that amazingly reflect our world today.
2004 (19) © MY
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!, Nov. 10 2003
By 
Kaikitsune (Tampere, Finland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
As a Finn I feel slight guilt over not having read Waltari at all before 2003. Prejudiced towards his era's Finnish authors or just against his name which for some peculiar reason represented something for "old generation" and boring, unenthusiastic way of story telling (who can claim Kalle Päätalo doesn't sound like a boring author too..). I read couple of his earlier works which haven't been translated into other languages I think and after those I was convinced that prejudice had ecclipsed the masteful story telling abilities of Mika Waltari. The Egyptian is the third Waltari book I have read. Doctor in ancient Egypt?? Written by a Finn and gotten huge success all over the world? Somewhat uncommon framework for a book and I had no idea what to expect. I did some cautious non-spoiling background digging in order to establish some sort of an idea of the book. I learned that egyptologists consider the book amazingly accurate description of the culture in that era and that Waltari had done his Egypt + surrouding areas research very well but had never visited Egypt. It is said that he didn't make notes about the facts but just remembered and understood the essence and wrote the book.
I found the story telling captivating and humour embedded in especially Kaptah's long monoloques in a dialoque with Sinuhe were hilarious. Yet this story has a lot of philosophical pondering which always fits the storyline and doesn't seem separate from the story. Hence a combination of things that make one stop to think and digest every once in a while and the entertaining and uplifting humour and tragicomedy. Simplicity and complexity of characters, cunning manipulation and clever psychology all coats the story with even more interesting aspects not to mention the adventure Sinuhe and Kaptah go through. I found the book good from page 1 all the way to the final page. What more can one want from a book?
The Egyptian has many scenes which underline the cruelty, ruthlessness, power of love, loyality and the power of fear. All these are exhibited as extremes at some point in the book. Made in 1945 after second world war had it is rather easy to understand the certain pessimism throughout the book and distrust in people's ability to change and peacefully co-exist. Waltari shows how humanity often escapes in horror when war becomes intense. Book has a lot of descriptions of vileness, ultimate cruelty, torture and complete ignorance towards human life. Waltari also brings out the concept of loyality in very extreme forms. Some female characters in this book are almost exclusively somewhat detrimental for men's mental sanity. Nefernefernefer has not only a catchy name but is also a prime example of deceiving woman whose limitless power is in her beauty and manipulation omnipotence! While she draws all will-power away from Sinuhe and seals his fate in many ways at the beginning of the book, she gets a payback later from Sinuhe but gets still the last laugh in a way that one can only smile at in disbelief.
No need for details. Just give this book a chance and you may find yourself quite immersed in it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderfull novel for patient readers only ...., Oct. 28 2003
By 
Rudolf Spoerer "dowadiddi" (Weston, FL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
First published in 1949 and now reprinted this is actually a wonderfull book defining the times of ancient Egypt through the eyes of one of the 'common' folk.
The author allows us to see the wold through the eyes of a young man, Sinuhe, who, following in the footsteps of his physician father decides to dedicate his life to furthering his knowledge and become the best physician for both the rich and the poor....
Having a very limited 'social' exposure the the wealthy our hero meets a young nymph, so beautifull and alluring she may as well have been Nefertiti herself. The reader practically squeams in anguish as we see the young Sinhue sell anything and everything, including his own parents burial tomb in order to spend even one night alone with this girl. To say that things go badly would be an understatement and so we see our hero forced to flee his homeland in search for knowledge ....
The interesting thing about this book is that we get to see the times through the eyes of a commoner rather than thruogh the eyes of the more obvious royalty of Cleopatra, King Tut or Nefertiti ..... As a reader I did find the story frustrating in that one would almost want to scream out ... no no no no you idiot, can't you see that you are being used .... but I guess thats the whole point of reading a book that allows the reader to get involved ....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Of Men and Gods, July 7 2003
By 
Patrick Shepherd "hyperpat" (San Jose, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
Thebes, the Nile, the pyramids sitting in the background: the setting for this remarkable novel of ancient Egypt. Told through the eyes of the physician Sinuhe, this is a dramatic recounting of one of the most unsettled times of this nation, as Amenhotep IV, self styled as Akhenaton, attempts to throw out all the old gods (and their associated priesthoods) and install in their place his vision of a single god, Aton, a new version of the sun god Ra.
Sinuhe is a finely drawn character. We follow him from childhood through his initiation into the priesthood and physician's school, and his first infatuation with a 'noble' lady - a lady who strips him of all his wealth, even down to selling his foster parents' home, a rude introduction to the adult world for Sinuhe. Beggared, with a price on his head, he is forced to travel to other countries, Syria, Babylon, Crete, in fact most of the 'known' world of that time. From this position, Waltari presents a comprehensive portrait of the lives of both the rich and poor, noble and slave, the various cultures and religions that held sway at that time. Throughout these travels, he maintains a very positive engagement with the maturing Sinuhe, showing how the events of his life drive him towards a philosophical viewpoint that is partially in accord with Akhenaton's vision of a brotherhood of all mankind, a man prone to a certain amount of romanticism, but more and more leavened with a sense of hard practicality. When he finally returns to Egypt and becomes enmeshed in the political swirl of events surrounding the Pharaoh, it is as a significant player, with a viewpoint that enlightens both the promise of the Pharaoh's dream and the actions that others, from Horemheb to Nefertiti, feel are necessary to save the kingdom.
Waltari has adopted a style that consistently evokes the sense of living in that time, a little distanced from the directness of most modern novels, but where the sights, the scents, the people, the attitudes, the living style of that time leap out from the page. Along the way, he presents a tremendous amount of detail that, if presented in a standard history book, would be deadly dull - but here it is a very necessary part of the engrossing story. The level of medical arts displayed by Sinuhe may surprise some people, but just about every procedure described in this book is well documented as being in use at that time. Just as detailed are his descriptions of a society where social mobility was not just possible, but common - again defying the impression many have of an Egypt that was totally caste locked. Battle techniques and weapons, city architectures, sailing prowess, trading policies, clothing, even the Egyptian mummification procedures all are carefully presented, each piece both historically accurate and necessary to the story.
A fine novel of character, a careful representation of the historical period, and a quietly underplayed depiction of one of the early battles between monotheism and polytheism which provides more than enough material for careful rumination. Not many historical novels approach this one in terms of readability, engagement, or accuracy - a book that literally makes its chosen time and place become alive.
--- Reviewed by Patrick Shepherd (hyperpat)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent historical fiction, June 18 2003
By 
J R Zullo (São Paulo, Brazil) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
We have to remember that Mika Waltari wrote his books in the 1940s, long before other writers such as Ken Follett began their carreers in historic fiction. In fact, Waltari is one of those authors that made historic fiction a popular genre of literature. His books ("The roman", "The etruscan", "Secret of the Kingdom", among others) are all based on great and accurate historic research and a central character, greatly developed and inserted in his background. One other thing that is repeated along his books is the presence, in different levels of transparency, of Christian elements (yes, even if it's ancient Egypt, as in this case).
The egyptian of the title is Sinuhe, an orphan raised by an elder couple. Sinuhe's adopted father is a physician on a poor neighboorhod in Thebes, Egypt's capital at the time (circa 1300 b.C.). Sinuhe chooses the profession of his father, but the difference is that he becomes the Pharao's physician, immersed in the court's game of deception, rivalries and connections. Sinuhe's time is the time of Pharao Amenhotep IV, who tried to change egyptian religion from polytheism to monotheism. The cult of Aton - the only god - was not well accepted by the religious class nor by the population, and the self-renamed Akhenaton (former Amenhotep) was one of the most hated rulers of all times.
Sinuhe is a believable and complete character, although developed in an old-fashioned way. In fact, the whole book, its writing style and its characters have an old aura about them. Some of the situations and dialogues are extreme, and sometimes don't ring true, but those are rare occasions. Sinuhe and his faithful servant Kaptah travel through Egypt, Syria, Crete and back to Egypt, collecting information, meeting kings, girls and enemies. Sinuhe's life is full of things happening all the time. Waltari tells Sinuhe's envolvent story through the book. He was able to blend true facts with fiction in an excellent way, stablishing himself as one of the "fathers" of historic fiction.
If you've never read Mika Waltari, "The egyptian" is a great way to begin.
Grade 9/10
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A magical historical novel, June 8 2003
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
Mika Waltari's "The Egyptian" tells us the story of one physician of ancient Egypt, Sinuhe, set against the background of the reign of the fourth pharaoh Amenhotep, whose attempt to impose monotheism on his polytheistic country was one of the strangest and most fascinating experiments of early civilization. Sinuhe is a foundling, adopted by a lowly physician, and in the tradition of ancient times, trained to follow in his adopted father's footsteps, coming of age at the same time a decisive event is about to take place: the death of the reigning pharaoh, Amenhotep III, around 1380 BC, and the accession of his son, Amenhotep IV, who styled himself Akhenaton.
Sinuhe is a loner and a wanderer, whose self-imposed exile from his native country takes him to Syria, the ancient Hittite kingdom of Hatti, and Crete, before finally returning to Egypt, at the same time that Akhenaton attempts to overthrow the reigning god Ammon and his priests, and install his own vision, Aton, the one and eternal god, in Ammon's place. As a political move, trimming Ammon's power in Egypt may have been a wise idea; the priests' power had grown so great that it was challenging that of pharaoh himself. But as a religious experiment it was a disaster, especially in a country as rigidly conservative as ancient Egypt where change of any kind was anathema. We see Akhenaton as a visionary out of touch with reality and with his people, a tragic figure doomed to failure. And we share Sinuhe's ambivalence about this enigmatic figure, intrigued by pharaoh's vision of one just god who brings equality to all mankind, but repelled by the spreading social chaos this vision brings with it, especially when it threatens his own security and the lives of those he loves.
Waltari bring us some of the people that have only existed in the pages of history books -- Akhenaton himself, his incredibly beautiful wife Nefertiti, his scheming, conniving mother Queen Taia, the boy king Tut, and Horemheb, the military general who became pharaoh after Akhenaton's death plunged the country into near anarchy. But "The Egyptian" fortunately doesn't read like a history textbook; Waltari makes ancient Egypt and his characters come vibrantly alive. And Sinuhe himself is wholly believable; a man of his own time and all time, sometimes wise, sometimes foolish in the extreme, trying to find his own place in his world, sometimes succeeding and sometimes not. Waltari is not only a great novelist but a fine historian, and he kept the background scrupulously accurate. The book is true to its time and its location, and Naomi Walford's excellent translation into English keeps the reader moving along effortlessly from the first page to the last. "The Egyptian" is Waltari's masterpiece; it's one of the best historical novels ever written.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Doesn't Grab Your Attention, It Kidnaps It!, Jan. 20 2003
By 
Nathan Hofstad (Northfield, MN USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
I first encountered this enchanting masterpiece at my local library when I was in ninth grade. But as is often the case with the most beautiful treasures we find on the road of life, I didn't realize this novel's true value when I first clapped eyes on it. Already, I was a teen in love with Ancient Egypt, and when I saw the title on the spine, that instantly caught my interest.But when I skimmed it over, I was confused. The prose was so unlike anything I'd read before and seemed to have a lot of "dead spots" which bored and alienated me. Plus, when I looked at the author's name, I thought it was Japanese, not Finnish, which made me assume "Great, I bet this book was written by some dude halfway around the globe who's never set foot in a major museum or even picked up a good, solid, book on Ancient Egypt."So I decided that I could go find a better book that wasn't some impossible puzzle to figure out. Well, to paraphrase a quote by Lord Meren, The Eyes And Ears Of Pharaoh,(and the star of a brilliant mystery series himself,)"Nathan, you have the wits of an oryx."I'm a freshman in college now, and I've had the great luck to once again, find this novel in our vast library by chance. Now, I'm much wiser. Now, I appreciate the lyrical style of the archaic writing. Now, I see how epic this book truly is.I adore didactic novels, ones that both teach as well as entertain, and are so rich with detail that you feel you're in that person's head. Many of the ones I've read however, as much as I enjoy them, have just one slim barrier between you and the full experience. It can be difficult after all, to get a reader emotionally involved.But Waltari did that and more. There were times as I read, that I felt so sorry for Sinuhe that I got teary-eyed. I consider myself a manly man, but the last fifteen pages or so dealing with the love of his life, Minea, and the cruel end she met didn't just break my heart, it shattered it.And there were occasions when I got so furious at some totally moronic thing he did, especially when I felt certain that he'd know better this time, that I wanted to shout out "You blew it again, you dumb dodo bird!" and just throw the book across my dorm room.I marveledatHoremheb'sstrength,determination,levelheadedness, and cunning. I was also dismayed at his ruthlessness, bloodlust, and sometimes cold nature.I laughed at the hilarity displayed by Sinuhe's one-eyed slave Kaptah, was amazed at how sly and wily he was, and was moved by his gentleness and loyalty.I fell madly in love with the incomparably beautiful Nefernefernefer, and still can't get the image I have of her out of my head. I'd definitely call her "my sister" and start dating right away. But beware, 'cause her body burns worse than fire, as our protaganist found out the really hard way. In fact, it would be a very good idea to listen to the song Poison by Bell Biv Devoe a few times if you want to know what Nefernefernefer's real nature is like. If I were you I'd take precautions...... As I read this book, I was right there to see the heretic king Akhenaton cultivate his religion of the Aton, and usurp the priesthood of Amun along with myriad other deities to form what he honestly thought would be the beginning of a brand new day of peace, solidarity, bliss, and advancement for Egypt. And it made me wonder if perhaps, just perhaps, the king I dismissed as a screwloose iconoclast obsessed with his batty religion wasn't such a screwloose after all.Finally, as I finished this book, I felt that I'd learned a lot, and not just about Ancient Egypt. No, it was that exsistence itself can throw us for a real loop, and we can't be certain of where our path will take us, but we must just keep trudging on.To read this novel shows that then as now, we are all human, and it's an inescapable fact that we each have powerful strengths as well as dismal weaknesses that DO affect the people around us in a very real way. At the end of our lives, some of us will have fallen by the wayside, while others will have soared as high as any eagle. But you know what? If you can look back on your life like Sinuhe and realize that you've lived your life for just the mere simple sake of it, then that's all that matters.I can't travel around like Sinuhe did, but I do know where I'm going to go after interim ends. To get my very copy of The Egyptian!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Grand Entertainment, Jan. 6 2003
By 
Paul McGrath (Sacramento, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
About 1300 years before the birth of Christ, in what was then the greatest civilization in history, the new Pharaoh, Akhnaton, decreed that all gods were false, except for one, Aton. Aton was a god of peace, he said. He was a god who believed all men were created equal, even servants, and slaves, and people with black skin. He was a god who cherished even the lowly-born. Naturally, there was a great deal of resistance to Akhnaton's new decree, and the resulting chaos brought about his downfall, and almost spelled the doom of mighty Egypt.
That fascinating bit of ancient history is the centerpiece of this great novel by Mika Waltari, but the novel is also much, much, more than this, and in fact gives us a dazzling, up-close view of the entire ancient world as it existed thirty-three centuries ago.
The story is narrated by Sinuhe, a doctor, trained in the temple of Ammon, the predominant Egyptian god of his youth. His skill and luck bring him into contact with the most powerful men of Egypt, one of whom asks him to travel through the nations of the known world, in order to determine their strengths and weaknesses. With him we visit bizarre Syria, opulent and decadent Babylon, austere and fierce Hatti, the land of the Hittites, and finally artistic Crete, with its own share of barbaric, cruel customs. All of these places are fascinating, and the author gives us loads of detail.
It is then back to Egypt, where he shares with us the Akhnaton adventure, and the political intrigue that surrounded his reign. We get to meet Horemheb, the general who succeeded him, and also, surprisingly, King Tut, who was pharaoh for only a short period of time, and who died at the age of eighteen. Sinuhe plays an integral part in the proceedings.
But his own story is quite interesting as well. His first love leads to the ruination of his family. His greatest, life-long love was a Cretan girl whom he met in Babylon. (She was the victim of a shipwreck.) And then there is the beautiful, mature saloon-owner whom he comes to love in his later life. All come to a tragic end.
The author really brings ancient Egypt to life, more so than any other novel I've read. There is the taste of the beer and wine, his description of the "black earth" of the river valley, the grandiose monuments, horrific desert chariot battles, religious rites, gods and goddesses, barbarism, unusual sexual customs, Akhnaton's new city, and the House of the Dead. It is marvelously rich.
It is also very wise. Akhnaton, for example, when told that the Hittites are massing at Egypt's northern border, suggests that Egypt disarm to show the Hittites that the they are a peace-loving people! What a fool! And how interesting that the author predicted Jimmy Carter thirty years before he came to office! (Of course, there have always been and there always will be political naifs.) Here is Sinuhe, sadly reflecting on Akhnaton's altruistic desire for equality and brotherhood among men: "Even were the time to come when there would be neither poor nor rich, yet there will always be wise and stupid, sly and simple, for so there have ever been and ever will be." Inevitably, the peace Akhnaton seeks to achieve leads to war, and the brotherhood he seeks to impose leads to civil strife.
This is a terrific, fast-moving, wise and well-written novel, loaded with interesting historical tidbits. It very much reminds me of another great novel having to do with a vanished civilization: Aztec, by Gary Jennings, which was quite popular a few years ago. Both are great, and deserve wide audiences.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A Very Fine Reconstruction of a Long Lost World!, Sept. 8 2002
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
One of the best things an historical novel can do is create a long-ago time and place for us . . . and convince us that what it has given us is how things might really have been. This THE EGYPTIAN does in spades.
The tale of an ancient Egyptian physician's life and times, this book follows the events and travels of the aptly named Sinuhe, surnamed He Who is Alone, from his mysterious birth through early childhood into young adulthood and, beyond, to the waning days of a long and troubled life. Cast out and dishonored because of youthful folly (a folly, indeed that he never seems to outgrow), Sinuhe flees the ancient Egyptian capital of Thebes and enters the wider world where he becomes a true man of that world, adventurer and sojourner, physician and spy, while, all along, offering us an up-close look at that world as it might really have been. With him, we visit ancient Babylon and Hatti (land of the Hittites), and Crete where the bull dancers plied their trade. And we are carried back and forth through Egypt and Syria as Sinuhe becomes absorbed in the great events of his day as they worked themselves out on their ancient stage.
Unfortunately, Sinuhe is also a somewhat tiresome, and even foolish, character who is not always fully sympathetic as he consistently makes doltish choices and throws away what he should hold onto for his very life. He is seemingly caught up in every roiling current the world sends his way, unable to set his own course and, inevitably, an evil fate dogs his tracks for this great failing. But he is, in the process, witness to the rise and fall of the visionary pharaoh Akhenaton and to the great wars which rocked his ancient world and which eventually precipitated the fall of the mighty civilizations of the Bronze Age.
In the end, the mood is one of sorrow and resignation in the face of existence itself, a mood that is very redolent of the spirit found in the writings of those ancient times. And so Sinuhe, named for another mythical Egyptian traveler whose story has come down to us in the archaeological records, is very much a creature of his world and that, surely, is an accomplishment for any writer of historical fiction.
This is a fine piece of historical writing and one of the better renderings of ancient Egypt and its Bronze Age world that I have found. Aside from Sinuhe's foolishness, I was a little troubled by the somewhat meandering narrative approach with lengthy dead spots and constant coincidences where the same characters consistently run into each other. But basically this was a good one and the fine narrative "ear" for time and place more than offset the book's other failings. My kind of book!
SWM
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece of Historical Fiction, Aug. 17 2002
By 
Gail Moore "avid reader" (vancouver canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Egyptian: A Novel (Paperback)
Recently read this book for the first time and I know it won't be the last, this is one of the best works of historical fiction I've ever read and a timeless piece of literature. Originally published in Finnish during the 1940's and set in ancient Egypt around the 14th century BC, it is still a story very relevant to modern times.
The main character and narrator is Sinuhe, a man born in Thebes, who has written the story of his life in Egypt and his travels to Syria, Babylon, Crete and the land of the Hittites. I especially loved the descriptions of Crete and the people who danced with the bulls. This is much more than an adventure or war novel though, Sinuhe is a deep thinker & searcher for answers about the nature of man and suffers from much inner turmoil. The greatest part of this turmoil is lived out in the battle between the spiritually motivated pharaoh and the materially minded priests and military.
If you are looking for a page turning adventure that is also really great literature don't miss this one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Egyptian: A Novel
The Egyptian: A Novel by Mika Waltari (Paperback - April 1 2002)
CDN$ 18.95 CDN$ 13.83
Usually ships in 1 to 3 months
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews