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5.0 out of 5 stars Get started & do wholistic magical cooking!!!
This is such an informative book. Recipes galore. Having read so many books on whole foods cooking, I rate this one the absolute best. Simple & concise. I just felt like doing more cooking and felt truly inspired on a creative level. To make my own brew. Which is hard to find in any cookbook w/out pics. But what I really liked most was that the author credited her...
Published on Nov. 24 2002 by Nilsa Martinez

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3.0 out of 5 stars This was informative, but some of the recipes....
I like this book because it gave me a good introduction to macrobiotics. Along with an extremely helpful glossary, there is a list of vendors who have catalogs for uncommon items.
So, why did I give it three stars? Two reasons:
1. Some of the recipes made me wonder if they had tried them before they put them in the book. I figured that every cookbook is...
Published on Aug. 23 1998


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5.0 out of 5 stars Get started & do wholistic magical cooking!!!, Nov. 24 2002
By 
Nilsa Martinez (Staten Island, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
This is such an informative book. Recipes galore. Having read so many books on whole foods cooking, I rate this one the absolute best. Simple & concise. I just felt like doing more cooking and felt truly inspired on a creative level. To make my own brew. Which is hard to find in any cookbook w/out pics. But what I really liked most was that the author credited her sources. Just about unheard of in most cookbooks. I like knowing where some of these recipes come from so that I can check the sources myself & see whatever modifications may have been made for american taste buds. Many recipes in American cookbooks are modified presicely because authors are afraid of revealing the ethnic origins of some of their recipes. Thinking that the American public is not hep enough. I stay clear of those books. Give me diversity in my plate. I like sauce & spices, I can modify it myself thank you very much. Additionally, so many cookbooks are written w/out crediting their sources. Also I liked that most of the recipes are not only good tasting but healing as well. I started using more obscure herbs & roots because of the info in this book ie. burdock root for blood strengthening. I especially enjoyed the kimpira and the vitality stew. Cook those bones for calcium & get healthy w/out the pills & supplements from these vitamin shops. Pop a vitamin, na, I'd rather eat my way to health.
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4.0 out of 5 stars This book has some wonderful recipes....., June 7 2002
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
I'm transitioning into a macrobiotic lifestyle and this book looked interesting to me, so I bought it. I really like each recipe I've tried.
However, even though the author opens her book with a chapter entitled, "What is macrobiotics?" this book is not pure macrobiotics. Many recipes call for ingredients which should probably be avoided by newcomers to the practice. On the flip side, this book does seem like a good transitionary book for those desiring to try a more macrobiotic diet while still eating many foods which are familiar.
To the author's credit, the word "macrobiotic" doesn't appear on either the front or back cover, so obviously she isn't making a claim to be die-hard macrobiotic. While some recipes are 100% macrobiotic, some others which are not may be altered to make them so, if desired.
The beginning of the book describes many of the unusual and unfamiliar ingredients needed, items like kuzu, agar-agar, arame, hiziki, mochi, and shoyu, among others. Menu and shopping suggestions are given as well.
I'm not vegetarian but I imagine this book being a valuable addition to a vegetarian's cookbook library. Just skip the chapter on fish.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good whole foods cookbook, July 20 2001
By 
Deb Nam-Krane "dnkboston" (Boston, MA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
This cookbook is the solution for those "health-seekers" who want to eat by the rules (more fiber, more whole grains, less refined sugar, more vegetables). Many of the recipes are delicious, and it's nice to make something that tastes good but that won't give you pangs of food-guilt later.
A few caveats: 1. This is not a pure vegetarian cookbook. She has a whole section on fish. The author does not eat fish herself, but wanted to more fully represent the macrobiotic philosophy. 2. This doesn't give a good look at the full spectrum of macrobiotics. I'm not an expert by any stretch, but from what I've read of some of the other macrobiotics founders, this seemed very incomplete. She seems to concentrate primarily on the yin-yang principle (in her next book she talks about the elements), but doesn't give a comprehensive overview of how those can affect certain conditions. Also, as another reviewer pointed out, she includes a lot of ingredients most macrobiotics shun (chocolate, garlic, etc.) She seems to bend the rules a lot when it comes to desserts. 3. Having said that, when the author thinks a rule is important, she runs with it. Don't even think of eating raw vegetables or fruits, any white flour, or certain vegetables, like tomatoes.
All in all, I thought this cookbook was a valuable addition to my collection, but I didn't think it was a very good lifestyle guideline.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just delicious & easy to follow recipes, Feb. 10 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
I love this cookbook, which I have been using for about 3 weeks now, nearly everyday! The recipes are very easy for me to follow. I have been vegetarian or vegan for many years with some breaks, so many of these ingredients are familiar to me, but some are new, too. The main thing that I love about Christina's style is her sense of flavor & fun...my husband is Italian-American, & loves to cook, too, I'm Irish-American, & learned alot of Italian cooking from his family, in addition to my own vegetarian foods. This is really the first time my husband has 'fallen in love' with so many whole foods dishes. We have enjoyed nearly every recipe I've made from this book. This book is jam-packed with recipes & ideas-- it could be overwhelming, but as we love to cook, it is an adventure in pleasurable good health. I've been losing weight, which I needed to, also, without even trying. I have nearly no cravings for things I previously was tempted by which were unhealthy, because I love the food we eat at mealtimes so much. Thank you Christina!
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3.0 out of 5 stars This was informative, but some of the recipes...., Aug. 23 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
I like this book because it gave me a good introduction to macrobiotics. Along with an extremely helpful glossary, there is a list of vendors who have catalogs for uncommon items.
So, why did I give it three stars? Two reasons:
1. Some of the recipes made me wonder if they had tried them before they put them in the book. I figured that every cookbook is bound to have a couple of bad recipes, but I would say less than half of the recipes had a good taste and maybe a handful were recipes I would cook again.
2. The consistency was off on a lot of the recipes that were supposed to be like dough. Actually, all of the dough-like recipes I have tried have been too runny. That goes for cookies, bread, and pancakes.
I would not recommend the sourdough or South of the Border Salad. Those were the two you could not pay me to eat again. Good items included the Oriental Noodle Salad with Cashews, Penne With Black Beans & Mango, Baked Beans With Miso & Apple Butter. I am very new to this macrobiotic thing and I could be wrong, but aren't tropical fruits a no-no (penne referred to above)? And again with those Baked Beans, add more beans or you will have soup - and a very runny soup at that.
I would recommend this book if you are patient, adventurous & just starting in on macrobiotics. If you are looking to improve your cookbook collection, however, I would think twice.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The most informative, educational cookbook I've ever read!, May 4 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
Wow! Not since reading Confessions of a Kamikaze Cowboy by Dirk Benedict has a book about nutrition (in the case of Cooking the Whole Foods Way, a Cookbook!) changed my life so completely!. I've been a vegetariian since 1993, but had always believed marcobiotics was "pushing it" a little. I was so wrong! Christina Pirello has eliminated all fears of unfamiliar and unknown foods. She doesn't simply give you recipes; she tells you what the ingredients will do for your health and (finally!) explains WHY some foods are not good for you and some are! Exactly what do carrots do for your health? What makes mushrooms good for you? What vegetable grows through rock--not around it? How can an onion help satisfy a craving for sweets? Why do we crave certain foods? Why is garlic a healthier choice for meat-eaters than for vegetarians? How does food influence your mood? Learn to take control of your life and become healthier and happier for it! Don't want to be vegetaria? That's okay. Christina Pirello isn't trying to turn you into one. She's just giving carnivores and omnivores a chance to balance the meat in their diets. If you are vegetarian, you just may end up macrobiotic. Funny, that's not as scary a thought as it was before I read this book!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not a lot of macrobiotic detail, but delicious nevertheless, June 6 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
This is a very, very good book if you're trying to add vegetables, reduce meat/dairy, or just eat healthier. She limits added sugars to brown rice syrup, barley malt, and the occasional maple syrup, although she's open about not really wanting to use maple syrup. Recipes are pretty comprehensive, everything from sauces to desserts. Information on how to organize a meal is limited, however; you have to search through the recipes to find one that might be suitable for breakfast, and her menus look like five-course meals. As for the macrobiotic issue (in which I'm !not! an expert), she gives the basics of macrobiotics and admits that some of the foods she includes are not usually part of macro cooking. She also doesn't include a lot of detail about macrobiotics, so I was left scratching my head at some of the recipes (I thought in macrobiotics you weren't supposed to eat foods not native to the area?). But if you're not aiming for a strict macrobiotic diet, this is a great book!
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1.0 out of 5 stars Well, OK for macrobiotics, I guess..., May 7 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
Somewhere in this long title should appear the word "macrobiotic" so that people who are not interested could avoid buying the book!
Macrobiotic food is boring and even though often it has no meat or dairy, it is by no means similar to the lush and mouthwatering vegetarian or vegan food.
The book is huge so I thought I would get a bit from my money and I tried several of the recipes... to results from mildly disastrous to really bad. I've been a vegetarian for more than 15 years and can usually cook to the applause of meat-eating friends so I don't think the fault was mine...
As someone else said, if you a vegetarian and looking for a book with lots of recipes... don't bother with this one. My advice: buy any book from the Moosewood restaurant (just type "Moosewood" in the book search, Amazon has most of them), they're huge, creative and delicious and the recipes are flawless.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Just...okay, Nov. 7 2002
By 
Lauren Zalewski (Asbury, NJ USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
I bought this book a few years ago, just because I was trying to adapt a more healthy lifestyle, and for the immense amount of recipes in the book (a lot!).
I really don't see how Christina could have possibly tried all of these recipes! The several that I've tried have seemed relatively tasteless and almost inedible! The only reason why I'm giving it 3 stars is because the entire beginning section has some wonderful explanations on macrobiotics and a glossary of some different ingredients that most cooks wouldn't know on their own.
As for the recipes, I can honestly say that in my ever growing repertoire of vegan cookbooks, I very rarely refer to this one. If you're looking to go macrobiotic, maybe it would be useful, but if you're a vegan/vegetarian looking at this book because of the number of recipes....don't bother.
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4.0 out of 5 stars creative, inspiring reciepts that help you eat healthy., Oct. 8 1999
By 
This review is from: Cooking The Whole Foods Way (Paperback)
I love this book for it's way of introducing nutrition and ancient healing wisdom into the lives of the modern family. Whenever I am feeling unable to creat a meal with what's in the fridge Chirstina's book has a reciept to do it. She's is building a bridge between taist buds and healthy eating. My family likes most of the things I fix and I feel good knowing I am helping them be well. The only thing I don't like about the book is that it can be hard to find a reciept that I've enjoyed if I forget to mark it. There are so many reciepts that they seem to get lost. There is no list of reciept names and the index isn't as thorough as I'd like. But, if your interested in a diet with good food and gormet taist this book can take you there, it's a must!
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Cooking The Whole Foods Way
Cooking The Whole Foods Way by Christina Pirello (Paperback - March 1 1997)
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