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5.0 out of 5 stars How does he do it?
What makes Roth so special? While so many other aging writers resort to rehashing older themes, descend into old fogey sentimentality, or simply fade away altogether, Roth only gets stronger. Stronger and more assured in his style and stronger in the subjects he tackles. "Operation Shylock" finds Roth once again challenging the reader's perceptions about fiction and...
Published on July 29 2003 by Daniel Fineberg

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3.0 out of 5 stars An Endless Classic
Amazing.... Philip Roth has pulled off the unthinkable. He writes a book with no ending and he gets away with it. He not only gets away with it, he does it with style. Boring at times, brilliant at others, this book works to a nerve racking frenzy, and then Roth cuts us loose. It's almost as if he gets writer's block right before the last chapter! But that remains...
Published on July 31 2000


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5.0 out of 5 stars Philip Roth's work continues to impress, Sept. 7 1999
By A Customer
My introduction to Philip Roth was Portnoy's Complaint. A wonderful book and a wonderful introduction. I am a huge fan of Roth. He is my favorite author. His early work is wonderful but over time he has worked in a more sophisticated manner and undertaken more complex issues. Reading Operation Shylock was proof of this. His use of language and the themes the book covered kept me reading late in the night on many occassions. This is not a book you can read easily or quickly. That, however, makes it worhtwile. Operation Shylock is a book you savour and contemplate long after finishing the last page.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps a great book, but not a great tape, Aug. 13 1999
By 
Brown3033@aol.com (Minneapolis. Minnesota) - See all my reviews
After hearing Opeartion Shylock on tape, the way I do most of my reading, I was puzzled about the notion of fact vs. fiction. The last words of the epilogue seem to annul the notion of confession. That is reminiscent, I'm sure to many Jews, of the words of Kol Nidre. We know that the Inquisition happened. We know the holocoust happened. But did this series of events happen or was it all made up? Now looking at the paperback I am sorting things out. The very, very long monolouges don't work well on tape. But my sense they are much better in the book form. It was a very good book, I THINK! And chapter 11 is the greatest mystery of all. I would love to hear from others.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the funniest novels I've read!, July 16 1999
By 
Jeanfrancois Lussier "JF" (Quebec, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
In an interview published in the New Yorker about 5 years ago, film critic Pauline Kael said of Operation Shylock that it was « the funniest book since Naked Lunch ». Those striking words awoke my curiosity right away, and eventually, brought me to discover this truly hilarious and brilliant book - and then, over the years, other amazing works from one of the great living novelists.
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5.0 out of 5 stars so brilliant it's scary, March 10 1999
By A Customer
While some of the Zuckerman novels, like The Counterlife, focus on ambiguities of identity, Operation Shylock carries its subject to a whole new level. Philip Roth meets Philip Roth in a story that, despite the end disclaimer (and a possible disclaimer's disclaimer, "This confession is false"), may have happened. Even at the end there's no way to be certain.

Actually, this may have been Roth's "last gasp" in the humor department, judging by his last few books, but if so, it's perhaps the funniest of them all. Some of the situations here are so absurd, the dialogue so hilarious, that one wonders what Roth could've done as a syndicated humor columnist. As it is, Roth manages to concoct scenes that are simultaneously profound, moving, and hilarious.

The best scenes, though, are the soul-searching ones, especially the remarkable trial scene in which the Roth character (or whatever) delves into his own thoughts, then into the thoughts of those around him, in a mesmerizing way. Roth is an enormously talented writer, and his ability to depict the mind of someone (or himself) is simply remarkable.

In his last few books Roth has let loose with his prose, and reading Operation Shylock is like watching a piano or violin virtuoso who is so good s/he seems to transcend us mere mortals. His ability to weave long, complex sentences that don't become obscure for a second is something few other writers in the English language have ever matched. Should've won the Pullitzer.
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5.0 out of 5 stars 5 Years later, July 22 1998
By A Customer
Five years have passed since I first read OS and time has only improved the irony. Pollard's still in Jail, Oslo is floundering and Rabin is dead. What's so funny about leaving Israel to the Palestinians.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Guile, angst, and no reprieve., April 5 1997
By A Customer
A masterpiece. Roth weaves a spellbinding thriller ridden with sardonic wit and the ironic guile of middle-aged man caught in the whirlpool of an identity crisis. Everything that Roth has believed in and explored in previous novels is brought to the test -- i.e. sexuality, politics, heritage. No sentimentality. Brutal observation of self. The man puts himself under a microscope. Lets the reader peek through the eyehole. Roth fragments himself because he is a fragmented man. Doesn't shy away from the shards. Only pokes himself with the razor points and lets himself bleed. Having spent Thanksgiving with Roth post the publication of Shylock, I can only testify that Roth is a study of opposites: cruel and generous, callous and tender, cynical and yet a "believer". In retrospect, this book should've garnered the Pulitzer. And Updike should've been shot
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Operation Shylock: A Confession
Operation Shylock: A Confession by Philip Roth (Audio Cassette - April 1993)
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