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4.6 out of 5 stars
The Japanese Kitchen: 250 Recipes in a Traditional Spirit
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on December 28, 2013
A wonderful book for those interested in preparing Japanese-style food. It is very well put together and includes all of the favourites!
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on April 16, 2013
i love this book very good condition and would recommend if you like japanesse cooking, and the book is very easy to understand.
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on August 14, 2003
I took this book with me on a year-long stay in Japan. There is literally nothing that I ate there that I couldn't find out about in this book. The lack of photographs is more than made up for by the excellent explanations and technique descriptions. I really appreciate that Ms. Shimbo gives you the Japanese and English names for the necessary ingredients - makes it much easier to shop for them at an Asian market.
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on July 27, 2003
I purchased this book after visiting a Japanese restaurant in Las Vegas (Osaka in Henderson). I had Sukiyaki and was so impressed, I wanted to try it at home. This book has many fine recipes, and yes, the Sukiyaki from this book was even better than the restaurant. Sometimes unusual ingredients are called for, but with a little patience and hunting, they can be found. I am fortunate to have a great Asian market nearby, and the staff is eager to assist me with my requests. I suggest you do the same, or find one on-line. Safeway just isn't going to carry Sweet Taro Noodles or quail eggs.
My only complaint is that there are no photos. You're on your own for presentation and techniques. But the recipes themselves are fantastic and authentic. Whether you're new to Japanese cooking or well seasoned, this book has something for you. Enjoy.
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on June 28, 2003
This is THE BOOK to have on Japanese home cooking. 250 wonderful true homestyle recipes - I'm in heaven! Not only are the recipes delicious and instructions precise, Shimbo does a good job explaining WHY certain steps must be taken - these hints are great for making anyone a better cook overall, period. My only slight complaint is the lack of photographs - but I understand the cost would have been prohibitive and would have resulted in less recipes being published, so I can live with the tradeoff. A MUST-HAVE for anyone looking to have DELICIOUS, SIMPLE, and HEALTHY food on your table! Being Asian-American, this book allows me to have comfort food I thought I'd never get again after leaving my mom's house!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 22, 2003
... that this isn't higher up on the list of popular Japanese cookbooks on this sight. I consider this book to be one of the most definitive books on the subject of Japanese cooking. The Nobu cookbook (which is the most popular) isn't Japanese so much as it is Pan-Asian, and then the other books, are all sushi books, which is strange to me seeing as, having lived in Japan, I know that Japanese people rarely eat sushi (it's expensive there too!) Hiroko Shinbo's book was given to me as a present, and I have grown to really love it. I was at first put off a little by the lack of photos, but then when I realized that it contains many of the REAL dishes that I am familiar with, I started to use it more and more. It is easy enough that anyone can cook the dishes in this book, and has all the real dishes that I remember eating in Japan.
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I was looking for a book that taught the fine art of okonomiyaki (Japanese pizza pancakes). I thought after buying this, if only it also had sushi recipes. Looking inside, I realized that an entire chapter was devoted to this purpose. It also gave miso and udon recipes, as well as the difference between oden and udon.
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I was looking for a book that taught the fine art of okonomiyaki (Japanese noodles). I thought after buying this, if only it also had sushi recipes. Looking inside, I realized that an entire chapter was devoted to this purpose. It also gave miso and udon recipes, as well as the difference between oden and udon.
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on January 10, 2003
Selected and compiled by food writer, consultant, teacher, and Japanese cuisine expert Hiroko Shimbo, The Japanese Kitchen features 250 wonderful recipes drawn from traditional Japanese kitchens. Enhanced descriptions of Japanese ingredients (including where to find them and how to choose them), as well as with helpful illustrations and clear, step-by-step preparational instructions, the recipes range from Ingen no Kurumi-miso-ae (Green Beans in Walnut-Miso Dressing); Shimeji Gohan (Rice with Shimeji Mushrooms); and Buta-miso Ramen (Ramen with Pork-and-Miso Sauce); to Suzuki no Gomamiso-yaki (Broiled Sea Bass with Sesame Seeds); Tori-nabe (Hearty Chicken Hot Pot); and Mushi Chokoreito Keiki (Light and Delightful Steamed Chocolate Cake). Informative and thoroughly "user friendly", The Japanese Kitchen is enthusiastically recommended for inclusion into multi-cultural and ethnic cookbook collections.
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on June 30, 2001
I must say that Hiroko has been my teacher and I have been assisteing in her classes in Madrid, Spain. I did really learn from her and from her book wiche is just great and wonderful, her ideas and explanations are just unique. I do really highly recommend it. She should also write books about Vietnamese and Thai cuisine.she is just great in that type of kitchen also.
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