Customer Reviews


16 Reviews
5 star:
 (13)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I wish it were required reading at every level of education., Oct. 13 2001
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
Studs Terkel wanted to write a book about working for a living. So he sat down with a grocery store cashier and interviewed her about her job. He didn't ask very many questions; he just turned on a tape recorder and let her pour her heart out. She explained what she did for a living, how and why she came to do it, what she liked and disliked about her job. She talked about the little dramas and boredom that filled her working hours and the toll it took on her private life. When she was finished talking she had created a vivid "snapshot" with words of what it's like to work as a grocery store cashier.
Then Studs interviewed a bartender, a teacher, a pro athlete and dozens of other people from dozens of professions. They each created in their own words unique self-portraits of themselves at work. The book Working is like an art gallery filled with these detailed self-portraits.
And just like strolling through an art gallery looking at paintings will give you a feel for the visions of a variety of artists, reading Working will give you a taste of the flavor of the working lives of it's subjects.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Follow your Dreams, Dec 18 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
This is a great book. It shows how real people feel about the job that they perform by interviewing them. Terkel describes his legacy of taped interviews this way: "It's the ordinary people, so called, who have things that they wanted to say all their lives, so this is something of a treasury I'd say." You read about it all, from waiters to teachers, from people who play sports to the people who work in offices. You learn that in order to be happy in life you must follow your dream and not do something based on status or salary. Many times people are being deprived of the potential joys in work when we are trained to focus too much on status and salary. Its better to wake up every morning looking forward to working than living a life full of regrets.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Do We Do The Things We Do?, Dec 18 2002
By 
"nannabananna21" (Los Angeles, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
First of all this book was absolutely fabulous. It makes you stop and think about the way that you treat the average working class person. That may help you EVERYDAY yet, some never stop to awknowledge them. Think about it? When was the last time that you said thank you to the Bagger at the local grocery store, or the guy at the gas station? How about the last time that you said hello to the person at the drive-through window? The postman? Have you ever thought of writing a letter to a company that has brought you products since you were a little child? These people help us continue with our everyday lives, yet we do not awknowledge them, thank them, or commend them on a job that would get done if they were not there. Instead we look down upon them, our kids do not want to become them, yet thousands of people go to work everyday loathing their jobs, because they never seem to get a pat on the back, a smile, or a simple thanks. This book has made me want to go back in time and thank every person that is apart of the working claas, that has ever helped me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "dangerous" social critique, Oct. 24 2001
By 
Barbara R. Saunders "Writer" (San Francisco, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
I feel compelled to respond to brothersjudddotcom.
Nowhere in Terkel's book do I get the notion that he believes people "don't want to work." I imagine Terkel loves his own work. The subject of the book is the way that most jobs (even "good" jobs) have become dehumanizing. Robotizing.
One of his interviewees, a filmmaker, comments on an "educational film" she saw, one intended to inspire "ghetto kids" to pursue their dreams. She remarks that the "most (financially) successful" subject in the film, a businessman, spoke about his money and his possessions while a "less successful" sculptor led a tour of his studio and spoke about his actual work. She says that she feel people are being deprived of the potential joys in work when we are trained to focus too much on status and salary.
He also interviews actor Rip Torn, who laments that actors are expected to be "shills" to tailor their performances to the selling of products. For example, Torn tells a story about being required to smoke cigarettes rather than cigars in a particular role. Historically, the character would not have smoked cigarettes; the sponsor was a cigarette company. Torn felt that both his art and his intelligence, as well as that of the audience, were sold out by this demand.
Far from being "badly dated," Terkel's critique is monstrously accurate today. Now, as contrasted with the 1970s, in many families, both parents "devote" 10+ hours to power games at work at the expense of family time, personal health, community, etc.
I believe that Terkel believes meaningful work to be essential to the human spirit. Problem is, as amount of work increases, meaning seems to be decreasing.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars America Speaks, June 13 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
What is America? A funny-shaped badge on a map? Britney Spears, McDonalds, Nike, and the Statue of Liberty? The Declaration of Independence? The New York Yankees?
It's the people that make America America. How well do you know what the average person thinks and feels about work and values and life in general?
Studs Terkel's Working is the closest you can get to seeing the soul of America. In a penetrating series of interviews, you are taken inside the lives of the ordinary American-and you discover how extraordinary each and every life is.
All classes of people from all types of professions (from the washroom attendant to the international executive to the prostitute) and all different personalities are here. And if you don't like it? Tough! It's truth. The interviews are straightforward and candid, often shocking and rarely dull, revealing all the best and worst of human striving. What more do you want?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice Find, Jan. 25 2003
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
I found this book sitting tattered on a bookshelf while staying at a bed and breakfast in Tennessee. I could not put this book down and would recommend it to anyone who feels alone when issues come up regarding work and how it affects their lives. Although written in the early 70's, this book speaks of many issues that confront workers today.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We see what we want to see, July 27 2003
By 
Scott R (Seattle, WA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
Working has been my favorite book - likely the book that had the most implicit impact on the way I think - for many years. I pick it up every year and read a random section, put it back down, and pick it up again. Real stories, genuinely collected.
The comments are interesting - everyone interprets what Terkel gathered in a way that meets their own worldview. Not too surprising, but read it yourself, and draw your own conclusions - maybe even new ones.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Moving Oral Narrative, Jan. 18 2001
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
Studs Terkel is a master at getting people to open up, and careful to include several interviewees whose gripes help reinforce his liberal agenda. We hear a stockbroker, trucker, priest, hooker, teller, cops, teachers, autoworkers, and many others discuss their livelihoods. Readers come away appreciating the unique challenges of each job, and the powerlessness that afflicts many employees. These interviews occurred primarily in Chicago during the early 1970's, when the workplace featured fewer women and more jobs in heavy industry. We meet Mike, a steelworker annoyed by his lack of skills who senses that his union job may vanish - as occurred a few years later when US Steel shut their Chicago South Works. Barbara is a young advertising executive forced to deal with a level of office sexism one hopes is now passé. Ex-railroaders Bill and Louis each lament the shriveling of their once-vital industry from separate perches as retiree and washroom attendant. "Working" has many similar, compelling tales. The book may be slightly dated, but it remains a highly informative read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very readable contemporary history., May 31 2000
By 
S Smyth (Belfast, Co Antrim United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
The drugstore owner, the hooker, the ex-stockbroker and steel worker, the nurse, the school teacher, etc., all these people have committed their working life's experience to tape from which Studs Terkel then puts this great book together. And whilst the stories are all fascinating, they do seem to suffer from a kind of homogeneous quality, as if, no matter who the interviewee is, the characters' voices all seem to sound like the same person, only the details determining their sex or experience, adding any differentiation. A minor point, I know, but it tends to veil the individuals beneath a worn down resignedness of whether their experiences were good, bad, or so, so.
I was alerted to this book when reading a Stephen King article about banned books in American colleges, this being one of them, after a school kid used it as the basis for a homework exercise and his mother threw a fit over it. I can't see why myself, but there you are.
Working, is nearly thirty years old now. Nonetheless, its just as relevant today as when Studs Terkel wrote it. And fine reading it is, too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Engrossing, moving, insightful first-person narratives, Oct. 6 2000
This review is from: Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do (Paperback)
I had always meant to read "Working," but had never gotten around to it. Then I picked up another book loosely based on it ("Gig"), so decided to get the original "Working" as well.
"Working" is moving and brilliant and a million times better than "Gig." Somehow, Terkel lets the people do their own talking, but it's never monotonous, never repetitive, and they always have profound things to say. Reading these people tell their stories is mesmerizing. Terkel steps in just the right amount, organizing the stories into themes (sometimes very creative ones), but never drowning out his interviewees' voices.
Although "Working" came out in 1972, it feels surprisingly recent. The world of work hasn't changed all that much in thirty years. Still relevant, still entertaining, still thought-provoking. And the professions are indexed in the back, so one needn't read them in order.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day And How They Feel About What They Do
CDN$ 21.95 CDN$ 15.85
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews