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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be. Here. Now.
In the current age of anxiety, Pema Chödrön is both a refreshing and challenging voice. Basically, she encourages us to see problems as spiritual opportunities. Instead of trying to run from discomfort, she advocates staying put and learning about ourselves. Instead of habitually reaching for whatever palliative gives relief -- always temporary -- she suggests...
Published on Nov. 16 2002 by Ronald Scheer

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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More esoteric than "When Things Fall Apart"
I love Pema Chodron's work. "When Things Fall Apart" has become a bible of sorts for me. I keep reading it over and over again, underlining more of it each time. Her recent "The Places That Scare You" is far less tangible, somewhat more esoteric, more traditional in the sense of feeling more removed from our everyday reality. It just doesn't cut to the bone like her...
Published on Nov. 9 2002 by Connie Rose


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Be. Here. Now., Nov. 16 2002
By 
Ronald Scheer "rockysquirrel" (Los Angeles) - See all my reviews
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In the current age of anxiety, Pema Chödrön is both a refreshing and challenging voice. Basically, she encourages us to see problems as spiritual opportunities. Instead of trying to run from discomfort, she advocates staying put and learning about ourselves. Instead of habitually reaching for whatever palliative gives relief -- always temporary -- she suggests feeling and observing our discomforts, becoming more fully present in our lives, learning how to be truly here now. Only through this process, she says, can we experience the deep joy of being alive.
This is a great companion volume to her book "When Things Fall Apart." It elaborates on themes introduced there, describing several practices of Tibetan Buddhism, some ancient and long forgotten, which help us not only cope with anxiety but use it to overcome fearfulness. This is an important spiritual effort because while we typically think of hate as the enemy of love, it is really fear that makes love difficult. Fear immobilizes us, makes us pull the covers over our heads, and isolates us from others.
Chödrön, a student of Chögyam Trungpa, encourages the consistent practice of meditation. And she discounts the usual results-driven expectations people associate with it, pointing out that as we confront our true selves in meditation, it often becomes more and more difficult, not easier. And for those who have found meditation fiercely frustrating, as I have, she has alternatives. The practice of "tonglen" is one simple spiritual ritual that can be done anywhere, anytime, providing a dramatic and freeing shift in emotional perspective. Learning not to let disappointment, anger, and hurt trigger our personal melodramas, which sap our energy, we can find our way to greater equanimity and become a less destructive presence in the world.
I strongly recommend this book as a welcome spiritual tonic in troubled times, whether that trouble originates elsewhere or from within. As with her other books, you can read and reread it, each time discovering much to learn and reflect on -- and in her words, "this is news you can use."
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Profound, practical guide to attaining wisdom, April 20 2002
By 
"aregulardad" (Milwaukee, WI USA) - See all my reviews
I've read this book three times in two weeks. I read so many books about wisdom. The Four Agreements (not so good), meditation by Jack Kornfeld books, Nietzche, Don't Sweat the Small Stuff. I've read Pema Chodron's previous books, and those didn't speak to me as deeply as this one does. I don't read just to pass the time. I read to find wisdom. This book contains deep wisdom.
The author lays out ways to analyze ourselves, our emotions and our thoughts. She discusses how we as humans react to our thoughts and pain. Her book analyzes the causes and roots of suffering. She then asks "why do must people suffer in such a similar way?". Decades of acquired wisdom are then offered.
The causes and roots of suffering are our fleeing from pain, running for comfort. Fleeing without knowing why, fleeing without knowing where we are going. The descriptions of human behaivor are spot on accurate. This describes so many Western philosophers, political reformers, talented artists, and many people who are looking to find 'the one true way'.
After laying out the causes of suffering, she distills her understanding of human behaivor, and gives us ways to approach these problems. Practical, approachable ways that you can build on over time. This isn't a set of principles of "Look at the world with happiness, and you too will be happy", or a collection of trite sayings to convince yourself "You're good enough, you're smart enough, and doggone it, people like you". Slogans don't allow us to analyze and understand the root causes of our pain and suffering. This book lays out those causes. And it lays out ways we can study suffering, and use our efforts to transform our lives from unsure, troubled beings to people who have a firm grasp of themselves. This self understanding leads to lots of confidence. And she uses a scientific method for this analysis.
There are two books i read over and over. "Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind", which i've been learning from regularly for 4 years. And now this one.
Suzuki Roshi said 'We are always looking for something, without knowing what we are doing'. We are looking for happiness. This book studies what is happiness, what is suffering, why is it so temporal, and what can i do about attaining it.
And it helps us understand what we are doing.
May you benefit from this wisdom as much as I have.

"Science is best defined as a careful, disciplined, logical search for knowledge about any and all aspects of the universe, obtained by examination of the best available evidence and always subject to correction and improvement upon discovery of better evidence. What's left is magic. And it doesn't work."
--James Randi
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A discourse on the First Noble Truth, March 1 2002
By 
Donald A. Smith "donaldalan" (Sewickley, PA United States) - See all my reviews
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Pema's book emphasizes the First Noble Truth of Buddhism: that there is suffering. Her main message seems to be that in order for us to be fully human and fully awake, we need to be fearless in our willingness to confront painful feelings, and we need to allow ourselves to fully empathize with others' suffering as well. We will thereby develop a compassionate and open heart.
To tell the truth, I found the book rather unsatisfying, almost depressing, because of its over-emphasis on the need for a stoic, warrior mentality. (Perhaps I'm not spiritually advanced enough to face these hard truths.) Come on, Ms. Chodron! Have you forgotten the Third Noble Truth (that there is an end to suffering)? What happened to joy, peace, serenity, love, and nirvana? Isn't the cessation of suffering the entire aim of Buddhism?
Western religions like Judaism, Christianity and Islam promise a lot to the true believer: protection, guidance and salvation by a loving God. Vedanta promises even more: union with God and pure bliss. Buddhism is rather different. It says that the cause of suffering is our own cravings, and that it is up to us to liberate ourselves from suffering. But even within Buddhism, there is a spectrum of beliefs and practices. For example, Tibetan Buddhists tend to have a more devotional and ritualistic religion, with more emphasis on positive spiritual attainment.
With a somber book like Chodron's, Buddhism is going to be hard sell in the marketplace of religions. But I have to admit: the religion (stripped of some of its metaphysical baggage, e.g., reincarnation) makes more sense from a scientific, humanistic point of view.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, Feb. 26 2002
By A Customer
This book is a good one, and as challenging as one would expect. Practical, down to earth, funny, and honest. No dogma. The author is a compassionate person and it comes through in her writing. Pema Chodron, like another of my favorite authors, Taro Gold, simply invites us to think deeply. Also read 'Open Your Mind, Open Your Life: A Book of Eastern Wisdom' by Taro Gold. Excellent!
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4.0 out of 5 stars ADVICE FOR TIMES OF CRISIS ?, March 11 2009
By 
terrie schauer (Montreal, Canada) - See all my reviews
Buddhist nun Pema Chodrön wrote this great book about techniques for mentally surviving and living gracefully in difficult times. With the appocalyptic messages about "crisis" flying hard and fast at the moment, Chodrön's words of advice might not be a bad addition to the bookshelf!

The Places that Scare You is all about learning fearlessness in the face of the things that are frightening. Cultivating compassion and accepting the impermanence of things are just some of the lessons Chodrön draws from the Shambala Buddhist tradition. She writes also about how important it is to take life with equinimity -- that is, accepting the pleasant with the unpleasant and letting all forms of experience arrise in our existence.

No matter how good we are at living, explains Chodrön, we aren't able to avoid what we don't like and keep only what we do like. Seeking pleasure and avoiding pain is the type of behavior at the root of human suffering. Furthermore, simple human reality implies taking the good with the bad.

Chodron's writing is simple, cutting and at times, a bit bleak. But her advice is to the point and very useful. If this is the first book of hers you're considering, go ahead. Her voice will remain with you.

Terrie
- wayofthewarriorqueen.com
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5.0 out of 5 stars All her books are wonderful.........., July 22 2003
This is the second copy of this book I have bought, since I gave one copy to the local library because it is so wonderful. The whole book is overflowing with wise, gentle advise or wisdom as I prefer to call it. So many of the Chapters have added value to my life. Especially The Facts of Life which reminds us that life is fluid and never static so learn how to go with the flow and not have you canoe capsize. Or Learning to Stay when one is more apt to want to run away from a challenge. Finding the Ability to Rejoice was an excellent chapter because we humans, especially we Americans are all to apt to be self-centered and looking for what we think we want that we fail to see just how blessed and happy we really are.
The Chapter on the Three Kinds Of Laziness is one most Americans need to read. The first kind of laziness the author shares is based on our tendency to want to avoid inconveniences. Second kind is loss of the heart, or the "poor me" habit. The third kind is the "couldn't care less" type which is often related to resentment. Or giving the world the obscene finger gesture. It's either the world owes me something and I'm not getting it or the idea that because we aren't getting what we think we want we get mad and basically say screw the world and we shut ourselves off from others.
When the Going Gets Rough is also a great chapter because its a good kick in the pants reminder that life is both glorious high peaks where we can savour everything we see, as well as valleys with bogs and tough terrain, which if we would just stop complaining and instead become more observant, could provide wonderful life changing experiences just as great as the mountain top.
In fact I am reminded of how the most successful and happy people often love the process of getting the success more than the success and in fact once they obtain success in something they aren't prone to sit on their buttocks but are quick to seek a new challenge that will provide more life changing and positive lessons.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Facing the Places That Scare Us, Dec 28 2001
By A Customer
Pema Chodron's latest book, "The Places That Scare You," was released just before the world experienced the embodiment of all the places that scare us: the inconceivable catastrophic events of September 11 and their aftermath. Of course, we must not pass over the monumental suffering cause by these events. However, the real message of September 11 is to point out the insecurity that constantly lies beneath the surface of our existence, the groundlessness that we fear and either try to ignore or to flee. Fear ordinarily shuts down our hearts and minds; it makes our world smaller. But when we begin to relate to our fear fully and properly, the vulnerability that we ourselves experience is transformed into genuine caring for others and for our world. In her book, Pema presents various tools for facing up to fear as a springboard for giving birth to bodhichitta, the awakened heart of love and compassion. These include mindfulness meditation, training in the four limitless ones (loving-kindness, compassion, joy, and equanimity), and the practice of tonglen (exchanging ourselves for others). For people interested in learning more about tonglen, Pema has written another book called "Tonglen: The Path of Transformation," which is available from Vajradhatu Publications.
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5.0 out of 5 stars OPEN YOUR HEART AND YOU RELEASE SUFFERING!, Sept. 18 2001
By 
Sandra D. Peters "Seagull Books" (Prince Edward Island, Canada) - See all my reviews
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Pema Chodron, a Tibetan Buddhis nun, is the one inspirational person you would choose to have with you when your world falls apart. Being a follower of Buddhist Philosophies for many years, I have found inner peace, strength, love and fulfillment through my beliefs. Each one of us must find "enlightenment" from whatever source we alone believe in, but for me, personally, Buddhism has been the answer. As the author reminds us, "Loving kindness comes from opening ourselves to vulnerability."
Meditation, mindfulness and practices such as "tonglen" (taking in the pain and suffering of others while sending out happiness) can be key tools in ridding ourselves of negativity, anxiety and fear. Each of us has within us the power to overcome that which causes us fear. Chodron explains how we can use these tools to overcome almost any obstacle or challenge.
Another book by the same author which is highly recommended is "When Things Fall Apart." Both offer excellent words of wisdom and advice and both are deserving of a five-star rating. Chodron is a teacher, a sage, an inspirationalist, a mentor and a prime example of one who is good, compassionate, understanding, kind and loving.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "May we lead the life of a warrior.", Aug. 25 2001
By 
G. Merritt - See all my reviews
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"I offer this guide on the training of the compassionate warrior," Pema Chodron writes in the Prologue of her newest book. "May it help move us toward the places that scare us. May it inform our lives and help us to die with no regrets" (p. 2). Chodron is a Buddhist nun, and the resident teacher at Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia. Chogyam Trungpa was her teacher. When Chodron was about six years old, an old woman told her, "Little girl, don't you go letting life harden your heart" (p. 3). Chodron offers this "pith instruction" as the central teaching of her this book. She writes, "we can let the circumstances of our lives harden us so that we become increasingly resentful and afraid, or we can let them soften us and make us kinder and more open to what scares us. We always have this choice" (p. 3).
Chodron quotes Albert Einstein, who observed "a human being . . . experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings, as something separate from the rest--a kind of optical delusion of consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening the circle of understanding and compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty" (p. 9). To escape this prison, Chodron encourages us to live life with an enlightened heart and mind ("bodhichitta"), and by analogy, with the "rawness of a broken heart" (p. 4). "This genuine heart of sadness can teach us great compassion. It can humble us when we're arrogant and soften us when we are unkind. It awakens us when we prefer to sleep and pierces through our indifference. This continual ache of the heart is a blessing that when accepted fully can be shared with all" (p. 4). "Each of us has a variety of habitual tactics for avoiding life as it is" (p. 15), Chodron writes. She teaches us that through the heart practices of sitting meditation (the "natural seat" and "home ground" of bodhichitta training, p. 23), loving-kindness, compassion, tonglen, joy, and equanimity, wherever we are, we can train as a bodhichitta warrior. "Bodhisattva training encourages us to have a passionate involvement with life," Chodron says, "regarding no emotion or action as unworthy of our love and compassion, regarding no person or situation as unacceptable" (p. 115).
"Warriors-in-training need someone to guide them," Chodron says, "a master warrior, a teacher, a spiritual friend, someone who knows the territory well and can help them find their way" (p. 113). For some people, reading this book along with Chodron's previous books, START WHERE YOU ARE and WHEN THINGS FALL APART, may be enough. Chodron is a wise teacher. Rather than praising these three books all day, I'll conclude by saying this book is sure to become one of the most trusted dharma resources on my bookshelf. ...

G. Merritt
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5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book and be less alone., Feb. 9 2002
By 
Tw Rutledge "Thom Rutledge, author of Embraci... (Nashville, Tennessee United States) - See all my reviews
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As a psychotherapist and writer dealing with fear from a psychological perspective (Embracing Fear, HarperSanFrancisco 2002), I am delighted to discover Pema Chodron, an author who both supports and challenges my beliefs from a spiritual point of view.
Chodron speaks directly and clearly to our hearts, but never fails to attend to our minds in this thoroughly enjoyable and immensely helpful book. She goes beyond teaching us what it means to be brave; she shows us how to make courage a daily practice. I am especially impressed with what Chodron has to say about the value of moving toward (rather than hiding from) what scares us. She validates what I have experienced --- professionally and personally --- time and again: that fear is a tremendous teacher.
And last but certainly not least: if an excellent sense of humor is really a sign of intelligence, this woman is brilliant.
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The Places that Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times
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