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5.0 out of 5 stars Intersting
People are strange. They say how the character was so self-absorbed and how she didnt care about anyone else. Duh. Depression. Hello? Get anything out of the book?
Its a good book. Its the way someone felt. All the negative reviews need to realize that these are her thoughts when she was depressed. Not perfectly edited so that she looks better.
Published on Jan. 2 2004 by Bunny Lane

versus
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Umm....Borderline Personality Disorder?
From the break up to the attention-seeking suicide attempts and the trying to make herself depressed, it is only clear that this girl had or maybe still has borderline personality disorder.
I read the book when I was 16 and I loved it because I thought I could now put what I felt into words and finally get help. But the truth is, this book only makes you crave for...
Published on Dec 27 2005


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5.0 out of 5 stars Intersting, Jan. 2 2004
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
People are strange. They say how the character was so self-absorbed and how she didnt care about anyone else. Duh. Depression. Hello? Get anything out of the book?
Its a good book. Its the way someone felt. All the negative reviews need to realize that these are her thoughts when she was depressed. Not perfectly edited so that she looks better.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Umm....Borderline Personality Disorder?, Dec 27 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
From the break up to the attention-seeking suicide attempts and the trying to make herself depressed, it is only clear that this girl had or maybe still has borderline personality disorder.
I read the book when I was 16 and I loved it because I thought I could now put what I felt into words and finally get help. But the truth is, this book only makes you crave for more and more drama in your life and I only got worse and ended up attempting suicide(several times) and following a very similar path to elizabeth.
It's a shame and it's sad but it's true.
I have borderline personality disorder(BPD).
I am a lot better now to be able to see clearly into the kind of effect this book has had on me.
I used to love the author for writing the book but now that I'm older, I see it for what it really is: a book you can only get worse from(if you have BPD or even depression).
Also, I 'd like to add that some people might despise those who act the way the author did (by not wanting to get better from her depressed state of mind and attempting suicide as a cry for help and to look 'cool' or be accepted) but that's what BPD is all about: impulsivity and making irrational decisions, confusion, chaos.
You really have to live it to understand it.
1 star because it is a downer (which is the part that may go unnoticed to many).
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5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended, July 12 2010
By 
K. Braun (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
I found this a valuable read. Wurtzel is an eloquent writer who doesn't hesitate to portray herself as she must have seemed in reality - sometimes whiny and high maintenance. She shares her personal experiences, which I found easy to relate to.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing., Feb. 22 2009
By 
K Wilson (Vancouver, BC) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
There are some interesting revelations in Prozac Nation, but most of it comes across as more whiny and self-absorbed than anything. There are many books out there that offer better depictions of depression. The title is also misleading, as the entire book centers only around the author's own experiences and it isn't until the epilogue that she even tries to make a comment on our "Prozac nation".
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you are depressed, Dec 27 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
This book was very well written. It really describes depression and how a depressed person might feel.
Although, I might not recommend it for depressed teens as it may give them some bad ideas on how to 'deal' with their depression.
The end however can make you glad you never committed suicide.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Somewhat Been There; Somewhat Done That, July 10 2004
By 
Kenneth E. Wright (Kyoto, Japan) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
No one, not even for a single instant, can look out at the world through the eyes of someone else's mind. Yet, Wurtzel tries to bring us into hers and show us what it's like to view the world from a mind suffering from hereditary (probably manic-)depression. And since she is trying to show us what it's like INSIDE her mind, is it any wonder that her mostly stream-of-consciousness narrative tends to be self-centered? Who of us in the privacy of our minds is NOT self-centered? After all, we are all fated to be only ourselves 24/7 for our entire lives. And constantly suffering, as Wurtzel does from severe bouts of depression, interspersed with irrational frenzies, is it any wonder that Wurtzel does NOT seem to notice the affects her behavior is having on those close to her, such as her mother? (Yet Wurtzel still dedicates her book, "For my mom, lovingly.")

The hardcover edition of this book came out in 1995. Some of us love it; some of us hate it; some of us don't know what to make of it. But at 269 reader reviews and still counting on this Web page alone, it looks like this book is going to keep disturbing us for quite some time in the future -- particularly now that it's been made into a movie.

I understand approximately ten percent of us suffer from some form of chronic depression, including me -- not to anywhere near the extent Wurtzel does, but enough to understand where she's coming from. Why doesn't she act like a "normal" person? Because she can't understand the mind of a "normal" person anymore than a "normal" person can understand hers. If she could change her mind to that of a "normal" person, don't you think she would? Indeed, isn't that her motive for taking Prozac in the first place?
And since we're dealing with a person's mind here, not a novel, I think it is precisely this inability for any of us to truly be able to occupy another person's mind that is leading to all the controversy. No, this read is not particularly fun, but then neither is being a manic-depressive. Yes, it's often repetitive and at times boring, but so is life. And she does try to give us a bit of humor mixed in with all her problems
Although I recommend this book for everyone due to the insights it can give on how some of us look out at the world, I particularly recommend it for those �gnormal�h people, such as Wurtzel�fs mother, who find themselves either having to bring up, or married to, or have some other such close relationship to someone suffering from depression. Note that the hardest part of her entire day is simply getting out of bed. Note how her mind is stuck in overdrive and almost out of control. Note that while she is just barely functional, she wishes at times she could cross over the line into sheer insanity, be institutionalized, and be done with it. Note the sudden flashes of fear for no reason. And note the state of her mind when she tries to �gescape�h from all her problems (from herself, really) by suddenly flying off to a London she has never been to -- and discovers immediately, of course, that she�fs just put herself in an even worse situation. Yeah, I can understand where all this is coming from; and a �gnormal�h person after reading this book will at least gain a better idea.
Ironically, my only disappointment about this book is its misleading title. It is NOT about Prozac since she doesn�ft start taking it until the end of the main book. It IS about being �gYoung and Depressed in America�h. But I had hoped to find out more about this supposed wonder drug and what it feels like to be on it. Interestingly, though, in the Epilogue written some eight years later, she writes that while the Prozac did seems to help her sudden mood swings, after several years on it, her old problems started creeping up on her again. Drugs can help people like her, but not cure them. She is stuck with being herself for the rest of her life. Just like the rest of us. For better or for worse.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A new favorite, June 20 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
I thought this book was beautiful and touching and have no doubt that I will pick it up and read it again sometime very soon. However, I am not surprised that many readers found this book to be somewhat tedious or immature, or that they had difficulty identifying with the author.
As someone who has been through depression, I related to this book on so many levels. The feelings expressed and the thought processes were so familiar that I often found myself thinking about things in my life that I had tried to desperately to forget. I am someone from the same area, someone who has been to the same hospitals, someone who has felt and done the same types of things. Now, I am about to graduate from law school and am excited about the future. My journey to this point has been long and arduous, as I am sure the author's will continue to be.
For readers who have never felt the way the author has felt, I can understand their lack of ability to relate. However, to call what she is feeling immature or whiney is a close-minded view that I think you all should be somewhat ashamed of. Yes, many of these events happened when the author was young, respectively, but I think that it takes a certain amount of age and experience to understand why you feel the way you feel and to put it into proper perspective. To the readers who did not enjoy the book: I think you need to wake up and understand the realities of the world. Not understanding this book or enjoying it shows me that you still cannot grasp the idea that someone can be depressed, for a long time, for no particlar reason. Shame on you.
This book was a very quick read, with beautiful language. The author articulates feelings that so many of us have felt but been unable to express. Prozac Nation is definitely one of my new favorite books.
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3.0 out of 5 stars One Person's Descent into Despair, June 18 2004
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This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
First of all, let me begin by stating that the title of this book can be a little misleading. This is, after all, a memoir, and should not be taken as an all-encompassing generalized statement as to the state of teenagers and young adults today. This is one woman's account of her bouts with depression. Furthermore, the majority of this book is not directly related to the drug Prozac itself, as the bulk of this memoir takes place during the mid-80's, when anti-depressants weren't nearly as prevalent as they are today. Thus, the book is more a reflection of the gradual shift towards the drug dependence of one single person than on the actual state of drug use itself.
Though this book offers little insight into the malady and it's treatment, Elizabeth Wurtzel writes of her own personal experiences with depression throughout college in a somewhat compelling and intriguing way. The book doesn't set out to make any real mind-altering points, or change anyone's opinion in any way, it merely tells "only a small personal tale of one person's mental [anguish]."
The author does, however, try to make it known that there were clear events in her life that led up to her feelings and emotions, as opposed to some sort of chemical imbalance. Eventually, these emotions took complete control over her mental state, and the author could no longer function as a normal, more rational person might.
Though the narratives can get rather irritating at times, making Elizabeth Wurtzel out to be a whiny, overly-dramatic, spoiled college girl, the reader can't help but feel a little bit of compassion and sympathy for what the author experienced. Throughout all of this turmoil, Ms. Wurtzel did manage to get herself into and through college, winning many awards along the way. With an incredible support team of people who stood by her throughout an incredibly dramatic period of her life, she was able to overcome her depression. When things went well for her, she lived a normal, happy life. When things were on the downhill, the bouts of depression reared their ugly little heads. Though Prozac and lithium, and before that Mellaril, did provide some relief and assistance, it was, and is, ultimately, what goes on in the author's life that alters her state of mind.
Overall, this was an interesting book to read. It isn't some great piece of literature that will be remembered for years to come, and it certainly isn't mind-altering in any way, shape, or form, but it does provide an interesting account of one person's descent into a suffocating, dismal way of life. Elizabeth Wurtzel has been compared to Sylvia Plath on more than one occasion. Though her prose isn't quite as sophisticated, and her narratives tend to be slightly more gratingly exasperating, I would tend to agree with that analogy.
The film version, starring Cristina Ricci and Anne Heche was due out in theaters sometime in 2003, but that never came to fruition. It is currently slated for a straight to video release sometime in late 2004.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Get Real, June 18 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
Throughout the book the author pays to go to therapy, whines and complains to anyone who will listen, repeatedly gets people to help her in any way she wants, and now we are paying HER $14.00 a pop to hear her complain to us. I feel for anyone who is depressed, I have been depressed myself, but I didn't feel better after reading a book about it. Check out Rat Race Relaxer: Your Potential & The Maze of Life by JoAnna Carey, it has uplifting stories and practical, easy to implement tips to help readers feel better about themselves.
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4.0 out of 5 stars a pleasant book, June 12 2004
By 
anika (Las Vegas, NV USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Prozac Nation (Paperback)
i enjoyed this book so much. some parts throughout the book were a little dry but that's with like every book. a good read. i didn't want it to end.
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Prozac Nation
Prozac Nation by Elizabeth Wurtzel (Paperback - April 11 2002)
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