Customer Reviews


61 Reviews
5 star:
 (35)
4 star:
 (11)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Erotic, Sensual, and Intimate conclusion of a Mystery.......
This is the story of Gabriel a proprietor of a house of pleasure(the house of Gabriel). Gabriel is a former male prostitute who has become successful in the seedy world of prostitution but is haunted by is childhood poverty, his whoring, and being raped.
He is caught up in the search for the man who raped him and the mystery of the woman (Victoria) who sold her...
Published on Aug. 13 2003 by girldiver

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Don't read this unless you've read The Lover first
I get very disappointed when authors include characters from other stories but don't explain these previous characters or other story properly in their current story, and assume the reader has read the previous book. I was confused during the first half of the book just trying to piece together Michael's and Gabriel's relationship. I had no idea what happened to Michael,...
Published on Dec 10 2003


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Erotic, Sensual, and Intimate conclusion of a Mystery......., Aug. 13 2003
By 
girldiver "Enjoy!" (tangled up in blue.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
This is the story of Gabriel a proprietor of a house of pleasure(the house of Gabriel). Gabriel is a former male prostitute who has become successful in the seedy world of prostitution but is haunted by is childhood poverty, his whoring, and being raped.
He is caught up in the search for the man who raped him and the mystery of the woman (Victoria) who sold her virginity to him. Victoria is a woman of former position and education who has through poor circumstances ended up on the streets with only her virginity as her sole most valuble possession and sells it to Gabriel so she may survive.
This story is intertwind with several other plots that I could write for days so you should read the book and experience them for yourself. You won't get bored I didn't. I read this book in two days and hated for it to end.
You journey with Gabriel and Victoria as the mystery of both Gabriel and Victoria unviels it's self.
this is a wonderful intimate book full of sensual and erotic pleasure but like Robin Schones writing style extremely personal and intimate. It's like being in the room with the characters.....A fly on the wall. You can almost feel the silk of the bed sheets and smell the perfume the characters use.
If you liked 'The Lover' you will enjoy the story of the Angel Gabriel.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Don't read this unless you've read The Lover first, Dec 10 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
I get very disappointed when authors include characters from other stories but don't explain these previous characters or other story properly in their current story, and assume the reader has read the previous book. I was confused during the first half of the book just trying to piece together Michael's and Gabriel's relationship. I had no idea what happened to Michael, but it seemed to be very crucial to understanding Gabriel and "Gabriel's Woman". I had no real history about Gabriel's relationship with Micheal or what really happened that precipated the situation with the "first" & "second" man.
Though I'm familiar with Schone's erotic writing style, it was hard to accept Victoria getting anally raped during only her 2nd sexual experience with Gabriel. The phrase "a boy who wanted to be an angel" also begins to grate after the 20th time it's written and begins to lose it's meaning.
The story was decent (when I knew what was going on) and I loved the ending, but parts did seem to drag, and though filled with erotic setting, I didn't get as wrapped up in it as I did in The Tutor.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars A rehash of the Lover, and not for the faint-hearted, June 16 2003
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
Where I found Michael sexy in her previous book The Lover, I did not really like Gabriel at all. I can see he has had a hard life, but that is no excuse for what he does-he is driven solely by revenge. Angry, mistrustful, and most certainly capable of betraying anyone and everyone, Victoria is thrust into his clutches and treated apallingly.
Also appalling in the book are sentences like 'Gabriel could even make rape pleasureable' as he does exactly that to her in a back door scene which would make any reader of romance cringe, and even himself cringes as he tried to doctor her tuch after he is done with her!
Aslo cringeworthy: the graphically detailed description of his last female lover, and what he did to her (fisted). There is also the lesbian modiste who fits her for dresses and does the most fascinating things with a tape measure and a feather. There is substantial same sex content in this book considering it is supposed to be a romance. Those who also are not interested in voyeurism in a brothel would like to give his book a miss.
His explanation for why he is like that and the reasons for it do not make sense at all. The timetable and explanations are all wrong. That and the appallingly weak ending, are just a few more let downs in this generally bleak and grim book.
Gabriel's only redeeming feature was his friendship for Michael and even that is basically destroyed, or given a sexual component which make Gabriel even more selfish than he already is.
I can't see anyone as tame as Victoria redeeming a man like him, nor would she really want to. Redeeming him by allowing him full sexual licence to treat her like a sex object does not really ring true. Sorry, but there is a difference between consensual sex and sensuality, and exploring boundaries, and the exploitation of every human being in this book. It is erotica, certainly, if you like that sort of thing, but not romance. A happy ever after ending for this couple or Michael and Anne? I don't think so!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely Fabulous, Oct. 27 2002
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
Most of the other reviewers have summarized the plot quite well, with the ex-governess Victoria putting her virginity on the auction block at an exclusive men's club, known as the "House of Gabriel", and her subsequent unexpected sexual awakening. Gabriel, a man completely walled off by choice from his own sexuality, has become a sort of "voyeur" in his house of prostitution until Victoria comes into his life under suspicous circumstances. If you are looking for a sweet love story, this is not the book for you. The sex is hot, explicit, touches on the homoerotic and may be too much for some readers to handle . Mostly, the storyline is a mesh of the erotic/romance genre and is a sequel to Schone's previous work, "The Lover". I actually enjoyed "Gabriel's Woman" more than "The Lover", for I felt there was a bit more of a plot and I enjoyed the mystery/suspence aspects. The veiled references to the "second man" may be confusing to readers who haven't read "The Lover", and this is my biggest complaint about the novel.
The relationship that develops between Gabriel and Victoria is something quite refreshing and unusual. Victoria is a virgin who once is awakened, becomes a tigress. This is the one aspect of Schone's novels' I have found a bit repetitive, as does her constant mention of the length of the man's penis size. The relationship shifts then into different sexual realms. However, it is the breaking down of all of Gabriel's sexual walls that make this novel so interesting and different from my usual romance fare. Gabriel's variety of inner demons made me literally cry.
The "friendship" between Michael, the protaganist in "The Lover" and Gabriel seems to be hotly debated. For me, this was not homesexual, but there were shades of homoerotocism. The very existence of this is the essence of Gabriel's torment, so if anything, it really gave me something to ponder after I read this novel. By the end of the book, in my opinion, it is my conclusion they are friends who love each other, but there is a fine line btween homo and heterosexuality both men have resolved.
I am shocked at readers who did not see the love between Gabriel and Victoria. Considering all the changes in Gabriel's life after he became involved with Victoria, and how he became able to recieve love and touch from another human being, their love was clear to me. I'd love to see more of them in Schone's future works. I've read all her novels/novellas and her growth as a novelist is wonderful.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars 2nd book in the series. Very erotic!, Sept. 22 2002
By 
Brenda Condit "satinskper" (Albuquerque, NM USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
Wow was my first reaction to reading this story. I have enjoyed all of Robin's books but I think this one was the best so far. This is the sequel to THE LOVER which was Gabriel's friend Michael's story. Now while that one was exciting and thrilling this one surpasses it by a mile. I stayed up all night reading this because I couldn't put it down.
Gabriel is a tormented man. He is a former high priced [prostitute] but not for women but for men. He hated it. He only did it to get wealthy enough to find the men who had raped him so long ago. He has found one but the other is still at large. He now owns a famous house of sex. Where the rich come to act out thier every fantasy. On the reopening night a innocent 34 year old terroized woman, Victoria, shows up to sell the only she has left of value, her virginity, to the highest bidder. Victoria was a governess who was dismissed by a jealous woman and now after six months without work is desperate. She captures Gabriel's attention and knows that she is the key to his revenge. She is also the key to his salvation. Soon they find that they cannot ignore thier passions. The love scenes in this are so well written that the reader will blush with both embarassment and longing for more.
The story takes exciting turns that keep the reader on thier toes. ... is just around the corner and when its revealed its a suprise.
I really think that Robin has outdone herself on this book. She tackles taboo subjects with ease and makes the characters truely human faults and all. I would recommend reading THE LOVER first to get the full story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Flawed but fascinating..., July 22 2002
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
This was the first erotic romance that I bought, based on a recommendation from the site All About Romance and a reviewer I respect. I was not disappointed in the read, although it is not the kind of read I typically enjoy.
Those of you familiar with Schone can skip this review, since this is geared more for newcomers like me. What works in this book is the psychology, the motivations of the protagonists Gabriel and Victoria (both with traumatic childhoods, both with secret desires that have gone unfulfilled, and both with a legacy of shame and suffering). Gabriel is more in need of therapy than is Victoria, but this is late Victorian England. So instead of therapy, they have sex over three days and become intimate in other ways. Victoria is the more daring in that she takes tremendous risks to get close to Gabriel both physically and emotionally. Gabriel takes his own risks in trying to find a mysterious villain (called "the second man" in this book) who is out to destroy him and everyone he loves.
I cannot say much more without spoiling the book. The book starts unconventionally enough with Victoria offering to sell her virginity for a specified sum at a high-class brothel, and thus catches Gabriel's attention. Gabriel is a former prostitute who has serviced men since his childhood, and who has reinvented himself more than once. Victoria is a former governess dismissed from her last position and reduced to bartering her virtue for the means of survival. Or is she? By the end of the book, we find out a lot more about the pasts of these protagonists, and about how pleasure can be used as a form of intimidation, a form of torture, and above all, a form of vengeance.
Gabriel's emotions have been warped by his previous experiences. As a romance, this would not rate very highly since the romance, as it is, comes very late and is unconventional. This is a story about two people who need each other to survive emotionally, not about two people who love each other. (I would have to give it a 3.8 as a romance).
As a psychological thriller and a work of erotica, this is very nearly perfect. If I redefine romance to mean the story of a relationship of two human beings (and the assorted baggage they bring with them to the relationship), this works far better. I am not sure however, that I am ready to call it a romance. Schone's writing has pushed her into an entirely new genre, perhaps to be called the "erotic thriller".
Rating = 4.3 (deductions reflect the problems of classifying it as a romance)
Recommended = Very Highly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars longtime reader of erotic romance, June 19 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
When the cover of the book claims "erotic romance" I expect to see both elements, and for twelve bucks I should have returned this to the bookstore for a refund. Fool me, I loaned it out so my friend could see what's she's not missing and I don't care if I get the book back or not. Regardless of how long we've waited to see Gabriel, the end result is his story is too intensive in all the wrong areas, bogging down what time should have been spent on a developing relationship. It's hard to tolerate all the pages of useless plot twists when there's very little genuine affection between a man and woman. The harsher shock elements and painful sex turned me off to any more titles by this author. I'm staying clear as well of any more like this with this publisher, until such time someone wakes up and smells the roses. What happened to tender emotions of love between two people? I've never liked harsh and unfeeling. And because I loved Shone's early books, I feel a great loss and I see here I'm not the only one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars absolutely amazing, Feb. 10 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
When I started this book, I had no idea of the depths that Robin Schone would take me to. I was going to put off reading it until I read The Lover, the book that comes before Gabriel's Woman, but I decided to just read the first chapter. I started to read it and I couldn't stop. The story is unlike any I've ever read. Every so often I come across a romance novel that tugs at the heart strings a little bit, but this one wrenched my heart out. It was so beautifully told, and tears were streaming down my face as I read of Gabriel's pain and love. This is not a book for the faint of heart. It is very dark, and Schone has written it so that the reader is left in the dark regarding many aspects of Gabriel's past. She addresses many serious issues that I have never come across in any books, romance or otherwise. The emotion of this book is very real. I have read other reviews that state that there is no real emotion between Gabriel and Victoria, that the sex scenes are clinical, and that Victoria is nothing but a "receptacle" for Gabriel's pain, but I think that those reviewers couldn't be any more wrong. If they believe that somehow Gabriel and Victoria could have progressed in their relationship without exorcising Gabriel's demons, then they must have just been skimming through the book looking for titillating sex scenes to read. I would have to say, though, that the most beautiful part of this book is the relationship between Gabriel and Michael (from The Lover). In this pair, Schone has created a love that very few people could possibly understand, a love that could easily be misconstrued as homosexuality. For readers who see it as such, I suggest reading the book again, this time with an open mind and a willingness to see something beautiful and rare, and not about sex. If you can handle a romance that has not only a plot, but the most intricate character development of the hero that has ever been written, then I highly recommend this book. If not, then you'd best go back to reading the Harlequin books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Great sequel to The Lover; brooding, dark and erotic, Feb. 10 2002
By 
Dr W. Richards "wmr-uk" (Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
If, like me, you were intrigued by Gabriel in The Lover, and his relationship with Michael, you'll want to read this book. Gabriel, remember, is the other angel; the boy who grew up with Michael, whom Michael taught to read, and who in the end killed 'the first man' to save Michael's life.
Now, Gabriel is back, running the House of Gabriel - a whorehouse, to be blunt, where both male and female prostitutes operate - and waiting, knowing that the second man will come for him, to finish what was started earlier. He's protecting Michael and Anne in the best way he knows, with guards posted to be aware of any danger, and he's doing his best to draw the second man to himself - after which one of them will die.
Until one evening a woman, covered from head to toe in a shapeless cloak, comes into the House and offers her virginity for sale - for the same price that Gabriel himself was once sold for. He knows that the second man is involved here, and that this woman must be in on it; so he buys her and tries to get her to tell him the truth. However, after a while he realises that she's also an innocent pawn - which means that her life is in danger. He must hold her prisoner to save her life.
Gabriel, because of his past experiences, hates to be touched. Victoria, because of her background, her age (she's a 34-year-old spinster) and the fact that she's been living on the streets for the past six months, needs to feel wanted - he bid for her virginity, but makes it clear that he has no intention of taking it. She has also, over the last few months, been receiving anonymous letters which awakened her sexuality, making her want to experience passion between a man and a woman.
So, feeling rejected and not understanding Gabriel's rejection of her, she sets out to seduce him.
The love scenes in this book are erotic; they're also rough, raw and blunt. They're not for the timid; if you prefer your sex dressed up in pretty phrases in Harlequin books, you won't enjoy this. There's also some violence here and there, which is understandable given that a dangerous psychopath is out to kill Gabriel and will gladly kill anyone else who gets in the way. But very quickly Gabriel and Victoria come to depend on each other, and we see that Gabriel would protect her with his life. She's come to mean as much to him as Michael.
My one problem with Schone is that she leaves a lot to the reader's imagination. I'm not incapable of drawing my own conclusions about things, but I'm a big fan of introspection - especially in books about brooding, tortured heroes such as Gabriel. So I'd have liked more insight into the characters' psyches, motives, intentions, fears and so on.
As far as Gabriel's relationship with Michael is concerned, there is clearly a homosexual past of some kind - the reader who thought it was implied but not intended didn't read the two books closely enough! Gabriel clearly has conflicted feelings about Michael, however; he associates homosexual love with the shame he felt when he had to admit that he enjoyed what the second man did to him, and so he's not at ease with his feelings for Michael. That was the one big disappointment for me: the two clearly do love each other - though not to the exclusion of Anne and Victoria - but the fact that Gabriel found it so hard to kiss Michael, at a point when it could have saved their lives, seemed wrong to me. (Okay, I wanted them to kiss, anyway!)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars No Real Passion, Jan. 31 2002
By 
Passionate (Miramar, FL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gabriels Woman (Paperback)
And by that I mean no real passion between the hero and heroine, although there are plenty of sex scenes, and passion seems to exist between Gabriel and Michael.
Gabriel, who we first met in The Lover, now gets his own story. Like Michael, he is a former male prostitute. He now owns the House of Gabriel, and is constantly on his guard, awaiting "the second man"--trust me, you don't get much more insight than that until the last chapter. Gabriel's "love" interest is Victoria, a destitute young woman who decides to lose her virginity to the renowned prostitute. Just a couple of hitches--Gabriel does not allow ANYONE to touch him and, even if he did, did Victoria get sent to him by his nemesis?

I have read all of Ms. Schone's books, and aside from The Lady's Tutor (which belongs on EVERYONE's top ten list), each one has progessively gotten darker and more clinical than the last. Although I rushed out and bought The Lover in its first week, I did not write a review for it because to this day I cannot decide if I like it or hate it. What originally attracted me to her work was that the heroine was an older, more assertive character. She was average-looking, and no ingenue. In other words, she was unlike 95% of all female romance characters, and a refreshing change.
Since that first book however, Schone's heroines have mostly been virgins, and instead of dealing with and conquering their personal issues, they tend to just get sucked into the hero's pathos. In this book, for instance, Victoria needs to lose her virginity in order to avoid unwanted attentions; and although she is a gentlewoman, she has to work for a living because she has been cast out by her father. But almost immediately upon meeting Gabriel, all her issues get put on the back burner, and she decides that she must make it her mission in life to seduce him and help him deal with his emotional baggage. For most of the book, she is just an outlet for Gabriel's hurt and a tool to be used against him. What happened to the mature, complex women, Robin????
As I read Gabriel's Woman, the words "cold" and "clinical" came to mind often and, judging from the reviews here, I was not alone. Graphic sex scenes abound, and avid fans of authors like Thea Devine or Susan Johnson will love Schone's books. For those of us who prefer more plot development and sex scenes that reflect the characters' passion for one another, it is better to check this book out from the local library. The sex scenes are mainly used as a catharsis for Gabriel, and are calculated and mechanical instead of passionate and spontaneous. What is also a turn off, as some other reviewers have mentioned, is that many of the encounters seem to be uncomfortable or downright painful for Victoria. In most of them, her achieving sexual pleasure seems implausible as well as an afterthought.
In addition, Schone has adopted the style of giving the reader esoteric glimpses into the hero's conflict with the villain, and of not actually spelling it out until the end. While this is an interesting and ingenious concept, the passages are written in such a cryptic manner that they only make one feel left out, since the heroine and the reader are the only ones who don't know what is going on. I spent so much time trying to decipher Gabriel's past and defining different characters' roles in it that I continuously got pulled out of the story, which is never a good thing.
Usually when I look back on a romance novel, I can pinpoint the exact moment when each character fell in love with the other. I could not do so here; these two characters seem to be together because they have no other options, and although there is compassion, I could not really detect any love or need between Gabriel and Victoria.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Gabriels Woman
Gabriels Woman by Robin Schone (Paperback - Sept. 1 2001)
CDN$ 21.00 CDN$ 19.95
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews