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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best explanation of conscious existence yet...
The review titled "Be wary of the Master..." reveals more about its writer than about Tolle. It is ultimately unimportant to me what kind of person Eckhart Tolle is. His work speaks for itself.
"The Power of Now" is the most brilliant explanation of consciousness and existence I have read to date. It is stated so simply and eloquently, and...
Published on July 13 2004 by Micaela

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A few more things....
Aloha,I apologize for not getting this in one post!Eckhart states essentially that the mind is always causing problems, is always tricking you, and that the heart and body are always telling you the truth. This is a very odd distinction to make given that the mind, heart and body are one entity. And in that oneness, each element has its share of truth and falseness. It's...
Published on May 9 2003 by John


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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best explanation of conscious existence yet..., July 13 2004
The review titled "Be wary of the Master..." reveals more about its writer than about Tolle. It is ultimately unimportant to me what kind of person Eckhart Tolle is. His work speaks for itself.
"The Power of Now" is the most brilliant explanation of consciousness and existence I have read to date. It is stated so simply and eloquently, and effectively, that, if you settle down in a quiet space before you open the book, resist the temptation to use your intellect (to rationalize, compare and contrast), and just take in what is underlying his words, you may partake of the richest experience and deepest insightful 'aha's' you've ever gotten from a piece of writing.
And do get the book: put off getting the CD or tape until you've experienced the entire book in a quiet space. You shouldn't be multi-tasking when you read or hear his words, otherwise you will shortchange your experience. Lastly, do observe his pauses. They're placed where they are for good reason. This is the moment where you let the sense of what you've read sink in more deeply.
Then you may finally 'get' how to be present, to experience the vast and powerful "being" that underlies all our busy thoughts, awaiting our conscious awareness. And then, just maybe, we can heal this world.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELLENT BOOK TO GET WHAT YOU WANT IN LIFE !!!!!, July 19 2003
By 
Pasqualina Mucci (SAINT-LEONARD, QUEBEC Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I say "excellent book to get what you want" because this book explains why we do not get what we want. It explains very clearly why we attract all kinds of negative stuff and how to change that. Finally a book with answers.
If you want to get your life back together, I strongly suggest you read this book and I promise your life will never be the same.
My intuition and gut feeling has increased tremendously and immediately without consciously doing anything.
Try it, your love it!!!!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turn off the Mind. It cannot feel the way., Feb. 20 2011
By 
This review is from: The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment (Paperback)
'The mind cannot know the tree. It only knows facts or information about the tree'

Years ago I went for hike through the mountains of British Columbia with a classmate; we were both studying International Business, which also had a range of classes on cultural sensitivity and language. The culture classes included fascinating courses on Eastern Religion. At the time, my friend had just split with his girlfriend and with little in the way of emotional support, I commented to my colleague that I'd really gotten into Buddhism since we started the class, and that it might offer some perspective. Intrigued, he humoured me. I replied, 'In Buddhism, the goal is to forget about the past and ignore about the future. The idea is, just as much as we can't control things happening in other people's lives, and we can't control whether it rains or not, we shouldn't try to control things which are uncontrollable. They say, doing so leads to suffering.If you just think about things you can affect, and influence, you'll be happy.' He nodded, thought it was interesting, and we continued hiking. Although this basic understanding reflected my earliest contact with Buddhism, it still seems valuable to me, all these years later.

In 'The Power of Now', (structured as a conversation between a patient teacher and a skeptical student) Tolle focuses most of his energy on dismantling the concept of Time. The way we think of Time (something almost no other creature on the planet could fathom), according to Tolle, is a huge cause of pain and suffering in our lives. Yes it's a book on Spirituality, and it's so densely packed with 'Wow' ideas, it probably deserves a good 2 or 3 reads.

I've always wondered, in moments of intense melancholy: why is it when we remember our youth, we seem to remember our days being jam packed with experience, and yet as we get older, the days seem so routine? We have great days and we have boring days. But sometimes I long for the 'innocence' of youth where there was magic and wonder around every corner. Is it because we now know so much (as they say, ignorance is bliss) or is it because as adults we are so wrapped up in time? Time is something we humans made up to organize past, present, future, so of course, we lose touch with the moments when we try to make reference. A 5 year old with a strict routine, and appointments, seems comical. And yet that's what we do when we enter school, and our parents urge us to begin our studies. The more 'timed' our childhoods are, the less of a carefree childhood we seem to have.

If you're regretful of something you did in the past, you're trying to control the uncontrollable. If you're anxious or fearful, you're try to change something imaginary. Only in the moment, are you strong confident, and congruent. Only in the moment can you take action.

According to Tolle, the mind that created time, and tries to categorize and understand everything (often resorting to broad generalizations and stereotypes in a vain attempt to do so), is the antithesis of Peace. Peace is attained through feeling, not thinking. In fact, the Mind cannot conceive of Peace, because it would mean ending the 'overthinking Mind.' Positive peaceful moments are like gaps in a stream of noisy thought. And what is the picture of a meditation? Sitting quietly doing nothing, eyes closed, in the lotus position. What is the monk thinking? Nothing. What is he feeling? Everything.

Tolle says the goal of 'happiness', like some heroin junkie, is misguided; rather, the Goal is to be at peace. No inner conflict, and no resistance. Imagine being so peaceful that animals and plants can sense your presence. This is not a knowable thought, but a feeling, just as much as your ears can't hear colours, and you're eyes can't taste chocolate.

And with this Peace, what can we do? Or must we completely detach from society, like hermits in the hills? Absolutely not, for this would be monumentally selfish. The greatest ambitions of generous men and women, he says, must come from a place of abundance, and a place of love. Rather than withdraw into the jungle, the enlightened ones first fix the way they see themselves, then the world, as a reflection of ourselves, changes. All the Charity in the world, has to come from a place of self-respect, of self-love. When you stop suffering, the world stops suffering.

Just as one read of this book is not enough to absorb all its insight, one 800-word essay is even less capable. If you've ever been interested in Spirituality, consider this a great place to start (regardless of your religion).

See more reviews like this on the 21tiger site.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Eckhart Tolle did it., May 26 2003
By A Customer
"This incessant mental noise prevents you from finding that realm of inner stillness..."
Eckhart goes right to the point. Clear, simple, and on target.
The noise is constantly whispering pain: the self-image in a time-dream nightmare of defenses, regrets, and anxiety.
Surrender. Completely give up. You cannot get out of concepts with more concepts. Surrender the self, stop conceptualizing. Selfing and thinking are not two different things, they are the same process.
There is another way to understand reality. There is another way to know. Concepts are not enough. Concepts get on the way. Concepts are the obstacle.
Get out of the conceptual mode, and syncronize with the concrete experiencial reality. Then you get rid of the self image, the time, the neurosis, the craziness, the mental illness.
Mindfulness. The Budha's way. Out of concepts and into reality. The same message.
We teach the conceptual nightmare to our kids. We give them concepts and, indeed, a self-image. Then we put them in competition. Low self esteem is born. Worth related to accomplishent is born. Anxiety is born. Pain is created. This is how the disease is transmitted.
Eckhart did it. What extraordinary book!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved It, July 3 2004
I started reading some of the reviews of this book, both negative and positive and got worn out. We can go on and on putting forth our opinions about the writer,the way it was written, it is too simplistic etc. etc. What I know is this. The proof of its power is in its ability to create positive change in the life of the reader. For me it was a difficult book to read and understand. I've read it many times in the last year and I still find new things to think about in it. This is a book whose ideas are meant to be lived and I've dedicated myself to trying to live it. Because of it my mental life has turned around. If it can do this for me and for some of the people that read it, then it has accomplished it's purpose. Those people who are looking for more will continue looking. I don't agree with each and every word of this book. Nevertheless, I think it is a good introduction to understanding the concept of mental stillness which was a concept completely new to me when I first picked it up. I've since read other books in this vein but continue to come back to it. For those who haven't read it, you have nothing but a little time and money to lose.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Masterpiece., April 11 2012
This review is from: The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment (Paperback)
Simply a masterpiece. If you are lucky enough to be fully opened while reading these words, glimpses of the truth the words carry are often experienced. Basically tells you the importance of living in the present moment, and why it is so hard to be present in every moment. A true gift.
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55 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Don't Climb the Signpost, July 15 2004
By 
Tolle's book is an important one... a much needed reminder that is too easy to forget. All too often people can pass entire lifetimes 'missing the moment.' One can, like the worst type of junkie, become so comfortable with-and so used to-anxiety, worry, and procrastination that to simply experience tranquility in the present becomes an impossibility. For such people, the simple and inspirational teachings that The Power of Now details can incite a revolution in one's experience of being alive. That being said, though, this book possesses flaws and confusions that must be sifted through using a keen sense of criticism (yes, this too, is an important faculty of the healthy human being).
First of all, becoming present is a practice-not a realization. I'm not sure Tolle makes this clear. Like any 'new thing' the appreciation of the present moment can seem novel and exciting but if one doesn't make it a practice and use discipline to habitualize the practice, then one will have merely another gimmick, a spiritual toy to play with for a while and then put aside. The reason why all the schools of enlightenment require masters and students and instills its practitioners with discipline and a set of methods is because nothing in life comes all at once but must be cultivated with care over a period of time. Because of this truth, I genuinely doubt Tolle's claim that after his midnight awakening he was-all-at-once-transformed, never to require further training or practice. The experience he describes at the beginning of the book might just as well be labeled a psychotic break as a religious experience. Either way, the genuine appreciation of the moment can neither be totally 'on' nor totally 'off.' It is a variable experience that can be developed but will always remain part of the organic experience of being alive. Be wary of those who seem to show no anger, no sadness, no flaw... such people are usually very good actors and nothing more. Spend time with such people, in different types of contexts, to reveal the true human being. No unidimensional personality can exist in reality. We are always part of our context and environment and no matter our training or character can be expected to occasionally fall short of others' expectations.
A guide to enlightenment, then, should teach us that enlightenment is neither a great distance away nor too near. It is thoughtful experience revealed through action and word. I have seen car mechanics who are enlightened beings when they work on cars but atrocious when with their families. I have met novelists who convey all the wisdom in the world through a pen but seem haughty and fractured in normal human conversation. And I have met spiritual 'masters' who secretly creep away to have sex for the sixth time in a day or to check their stocks on the internet. Enlightenment is a myth, and some people treat it like a commodity to purchase or sell. To live well requires the experience of the present-often-but not all the time and in all situations.
Joseph Campbell once expressed the opinion that the type of enlightenment we have become familiar with is unique to a conception of self that was once fairly common in Asia. The type of self most moderns live by, especially we very 'special' Westerners with our love for 'Individuality' and 'Self-Expression,' excludes the possibility of such an experience. Perhaps it is time, then, we drop this idea and redefine what enlightenment should mean now-and to people like us.
Use this book as a pointer and compass, not as a map. The Buddha said it best, Be Lamps Unto Yourselves. I would add-and don't hide from the dark when it comes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A few more things...., May 9 2003
By 
John "Kula Kine" (Kula, HI United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Aloha,I apologize for not getting this in one post!Eckhart states essentially that the mind is always causing problems, is always tricking you, and that the heart and body are always telling you the truth. This is a very odd distinction to make given that the mind, heart and body are one entity. And in that oneness, each element has its share of truth and falseness. It's unbalanced to soley focus on the mind as the villian.Also, Tolle states that in the years to come many women are going to experience full enlightenment during their menstration period. That whole section really left me scratching my head. In essence, if you follow his reasoning, gay women who are having their period have the greatest potential for enlightenment. Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with being a gay women having their period. Yet Tolle's reasoning about how this relates to one's potential for spiritual advancement is nothing short of very, very, very bizarre. The cover of the book contains a quote of endorsement by Deepak Chopra, one of the most prominent and blatant charlatans of the past century. Chopra passes himself off as a spiritual teacher, when in truth he is simply an editor of eastern esoteric texts. He reads them, and then reduces it down to a reader's digest version for a western audience. There's no great insight of his own. On top of that, Chopra then has turned these cliff notes of eastern mysticism into a multi-million dollar greedy business which seeks to take advantage of the spiritual vacumn found in the west. While such capitalism may be the American way, one certainly must question the sanctity of such a greedy movement as it relates to the spiritual. Shouldn't we expect more out of spiritual leaders?Also, there are numerous reports on the web about the blatant abuses by Chopra towards his staff written by ex staff members.The point being, why has Tolle featured Chopra on the cover of his book? Why feature an example of what a spiritual teacher should not become? Just to sell more copies of "The Power of Now"? One can only hope that Eckhart doesn't succomb to the greed that has toppled so many spiritual teachers. One can only hope.Ok, enough for now......
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars mind, Feb. 7 2003
By 
M. Gentry "nothing is real" (Sacramento, CA United States) - See all my reviews
I read a review that said a lot of readers hate this book. Hate seems a little strong. Who hates it? Minds hate the idea of being called a tool. If you read Power of Now with your mind, you probably won't finish it. If you do as Eckert says and not get hung up on the words, they will pass right through your mind and kindle your spirit.
The downside of the book is that it removes all excuses - now that we know, we must act. I believe that this book may usher in the "New Age" - it could be the catalyst that gives humanity the strength to raise it's consciousness. Groups may form, energy will concentrate, others will be attracted. Many spiritual teachers speak of a planetary transformation during the generation beginning in the eighties. It would indeed be a transformation if we all lived in the Now. No more madness.
This is the 261st review. I seriously doubt that many people read all the reviews. But if you get this far and still haven't decided, put another vote on the "read it" side. Savor it. Languish over it. Let it wash over you like a warm bath. Now that I think of it, get the tapes and listen to his voice. The sounds make the words vibrate, and are more likely to pass through your brain. I was going to say "read it, you won't be disappointed", but I can't since apparently many have been. It's one of those "love" "hate" things - not much neutral.
Give it a shot - what have you got to lose. Just some of your mind, that's all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look Inside Yourself For True Wealth, Dec 5 2002
By A Customer
Eckhart Tolle's book is an insightful resource for living in the moment. I especially found the chapter "You are not your mind,"
inspiring. Just by reading the possibility that I am separate from the constant positive or negative thoughts I have about myself, others or situations, I felt a sense of freedom. I am able to distingish myself from my thoughts and live my life in a sincere and authentic way. Not as a result of my mind's concept but as a direct expression of whom I am. The idea that Tolle presents of how living in the present moment I am able to discover that I am complete and perfect is also truly remarkable.
Another inspiring book about living a meaningful life is called "Working on Yourself Doesn't Work," written by Ariel & Shya Kane. Enlightenment is no longer an elusive state for a chosen few, but has become a realty for many people through insightful and practical guide books such as "The Power of Now" and "Working on Yourself Doesn't Work." I highly recommend both of these books.
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The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment
The Power of Now: A Guide to Spiritual Enlightenment by Eckhart Tolle (Paperback - Aug. 17 2004)
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