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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny, Funny, Funny
The humour of Brendan O'Carroll is unmatched. I found this book on a shelf while visiting my sister-in-law. It was a very dogged eared copy as she told me she often rereads it. After reading it I can see why. O'Carroll paints a very realistic picture how life must have been living in Dublin's "Jarro" during the 60's. I highly recommend it to everyone.
Published on Nov. 24 2011 by JDenny41

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Quaint Walk Down An Irish Lane
At times the humor felt forced, the first chapter especially. Yet, by mid book, I was laughing along side the girls as if I was taking the driving instruction myself. The ending was too contrived. I longed for a little less fantasy. Over all, it was an easy read, and entertaining.
Published on April 19 2003 by W.S. Koterba


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Funny, Funny, Funny, Nov. 24 2011
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
The humour of Brendan O'Carroll is unmatched. I found this book on a shelf while visiting my sister-in-law. It was a very dogged eared copy as she told me she often rereads it. After reading it I can see why. O'Carroll paints a very realistic picture how life must have been living in Dublin's "Jarro" during the 60's. I highly recommend it to everyone.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Mammy, May 2 2013
By 
Helen - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Mammy (Kindle Edition)
You me laugh and you made me cry both in happiness and sadness thanks, nice to read the early times of the brown family.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Mammy, Jan. 30 2013
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This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
This is exactly the kind of book I enjoy reading , great descriptions of the characters and life at that time
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A bit o' the Irish for ye reading, June 16 2004
By 
CincinnatiPOV "Bibliophile" (Cincinnati, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
Legend has it that if you capture a leprechaun, he will bring you good luck. Brendan O'Carroll must have had the luck of the wee people with him when he wrote The Mammy, a truly hilarious book.
O'Carroll, who acted in the film Angela's Ashes, wrote The Mammy as the first in an upcoming series of three. His debut novel hits its mark with every joke and captures the essence of working-class Ireland.
The series centers on a widowed mother, Agnes Browne, and her seven children, all living in Dublin, Ireland in the 1960s. Her youngest son, a toddler, speaks little but repeats every curse word he hears. Her oldest son tries to seduce girls with licorice and finds himself plagued by a number of puberty-related problems.
The Mammy opens with what could be a heartbreaking scene of loss and sorrow: the death of Browne's husband. But with apt amounts of Irish wit, O'Carroll turns the funeral scene into a hilarious escapade that leaves Browne cursing her late spouse.
The funeral parties get backed up entering the cemetery, so Browne loses track of which coffin belongs to her husband. Without realizing it, she follows the wrong body and is surprised when she sees another woman crying by the gravesite. Without a second's thought, Browne assumes the grieving woman is her late husband's mistress and mutters "'Yeh dirty bastard" under her breath.
Another comical scene ensues when Browne attacks a nun with a cucumber and ends up in court - all because of a pair of knickers. The tale itself is nearly as funny as when Browne has to explain it to the judge. Soon, her only daughter takes the stand and, with a little Irish luck, Browne wins the case.
In The Mammy, Agnes Browne becomes an every-woman, the ultimate mother and friend. She manages her children (a wild brood), helps her friend through cancer and handles her husband's death with grace. And through O'Carroll's imaginative writing, just about everything Browne does is funny.
In the end, the book itself becomes a little treasure lying at the end of an Irish rainbow.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Mammy, April 19 2004
By 
Mike Wall (East Lyme CT) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
The Browne family of Ireland is a big family one that has seven count them seven children six boys and one little girl. Than unexpectedly there father who they called Redser died. He left his wife now a widow behind with seven children and pretty much no money. In a way these brought these Browne kids together they would watch each others back they had a saying in the book "if you messed with one Browne you messed with seven". It also shows how the mother took the death of her husband. Because now not only did she have to raise seven kids on her own, she had to be the mother and the father to seven little children. The way I rate books is if the book is so good that it makes you never want to put it down. With this book I got that it was a great book one of the best I have ever read. In a rating of 1-5 with five being the best I would rate this book a four and a half, just is a great book and I would recommend this book to anyone who like a good book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful story balancing sorrow with joy, Jan. 25 2004
By 
C. Stephans - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
The Mammy is an eloquently written story about a family in Dublin, Ireland. The book is entertaining and moving. It is lighthearted at times and at other times it deals with serious matters such as death, sickness and religion. There are several laugh-out-loud moments when the author brilliantly captures the closeness of friends who share tragedy and exhiliration. The several children in the story offer a spectrum of personalities and clash and interact entertainingly. The story is full of wit and insight into human behavior, especially the love between mother and children.
I have given this book and its sequels as gifts to the delight of several friends. And I recommend it for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story, Oct. 29 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
I happened upon this book by accident but it was a wonderful surprise! As the granddaughter of an Irish immigrant I saw alot of my grandmother and mother in this story. It inspired me to read the next four novels in the series, as well as learn more about Irish history. Has become one of my favorite novels to date.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A light, entertaining read, Oct. 4 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
Highly enjoyable tale of an Irish widow and her seven children. It is both funny and heartwarming and I look forward to reading the next two installments in Brendan O'Carroll's trilogy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Come Ye Back Agnes Browne, July 12 2003
By 
shoutgrace "savedbyhisgrace" (Charleston, WV United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
Brendan O'Carroll appeared in the film 'The Van' and 'Angela's Ashes' now author of 'The Mammy' the #1 bestseller in Ireland that started it all-the Agnes Browne trilogy. First came 'The Mammy,' followed after 'The Chisellers' and later they made her 'The Granny.' The best trilogy since 'The Godfather.' Well, just as good anyway. It's the funny, laugh-out-loud story set in 1967 Dublin, about Agnes and her lively brood of seven kids-Mark, Francis, Rory, Dermot, Trevor, Simon and Cathy. Agnes husband Redser has died. But being a single parent hasn't got her defeated. Not even the troubles with her daughter, Cathy's tyrannical teacher. Or the amorous advances of the French proprietor of a local pizza shop. Not even the medical crisis of her best friend, Marion Monks. Agnes supports the family by going to Moore Street at five every morning and set up her produce stall. There all the women meet to gossip, buy and sell. All the humor and humanness has an aroma of Irishness that rises above the clamour of daily business. Out of the average day Agnes makes everyone's day special.

There in the Jarro becomes a moving and tender portrait of working-class life in 1960s Dublin. To the fatherless Browne clan, Agnes is more to them than just a beloved neighborhood character. She's just about anything there is to be. The pages of 'The Mammy' have all the hiliarity of Paul Roach and the charm of Dickens. There are page-to-page funny accounts like Agnes educating the "facts of life" to her eldest son, Mark. Marks awareness of his changing self had me tickled Irish pink. The one of the man in the James Bond movie with the three nipples. The one about P.J. and Dolly Foley had me laughing through the whole Chapter 8. The story is an Irish "Leave It to Beaver" meets "The Waltons." I can't tell you how much I really loved reading this book. I loved the ending when the two Browne boys arranged a meeting with Cliff "Harry" Richard for their mammy on Christmas Day. It just goes to show in a sad and busy world that someone's dream can come true. When you read about Agnes Browne, you will be captivated by her strength and wittiness like you always known her as your next door neighbor. 'The Mammy' will warm your heart and put a little Irish jig in your soul. Slainté y'all!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Agnes Browne Trilogy:The Mammy, The Chisllers,The Granny, May 13 2003
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This review is from: The Mammy (Paperback)
Good-by Frank McCourt! Hello Agnes Browne! Agnes Browne lives life--finding joy in winning at the bingo parlor, having a cider with her best friend Marian after a day at her market stand, and going home to share a cup of tea after dinner with her family.
Through the lives of her seven children the reader experiences a wide range of emotions with Agnes from joy and sadness. From Mark, the success story to Francis (Frankie) and Dermont the constant worries of her life, Agnes loves each of them.
The AGNES BROWNE TRILOGY is a must read book! Super!
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The Mammy
The Mammy by Brendan O'Carroll (Hardcover - Sept. 2000)
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