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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Show boys the money!
If you belive in using role models to acomplish your goals this will become an excellent tool. The book is packed with detective-detailed facts that are almost emabarrasing to read. But the best starts when the authors chunk these data at the second half of the book. There you will start wondering how to change your live towards making a fortune.
But not...
Published on Feb. 9 2000 by Luis Casuso

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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Save Money, Become Wealthy, Burn This Book for Heat.
I received this book as gift, and after reading it, I am glad I didn't spend any money on it. This book is a classic example of taking a few simple concepts and restating them in every imaginable form to reach a decent book length. The useful information could be summed up into a small pamphlet.
Subject matter:
The basic premise of the book is how the average...
Published on Dec 30 2001 by C. Farmer


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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Save Money, Become Wealthy, Burn This Book for Heat., Dec 30 2001
By 
C. Farmer (Missouri) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I received this book as gift, and after reading it, I am glad I didn't spend any money on it. This book is a classic example of taking a few simple concepts and restating them in every imaginable form to reach a decent book length. The useful information could be summed up into a small pamphlet.
Subject matter:
The basic premise of the book is how the average Joe and average millionaire may not be too terribly different. The author interviewed hundreds of millionaires and then analyzed the data from the interviews. They repeatedly comment about how "Mr. penny-pinching trailer park owner is far better off with $1.5 million in the bank than Mr. Doctor with a great house and lifestyle, who only has $750,000 saved up."
The authors constantly rant about how being incredibly frugal and watching every penny spent will make you wealthy. While this may be true, none of the information presented ventures far beyond common sense.
Another tactic, which I found very annoying, was that various charts and data tables were listed multiple times but in varying ways. For instance a whole page may be taken up by a table dedicated to whether or not millionaires worry about things like cancer, their children's financial future, and the stock market. Three pages later, the same table may be listed, but with percentages rather than raw data scores. There are many instances where the same information is presented in what appears to be nothing more than an attempt to lengthen the book. I found myself wanting to pound my head against the wall.
I would not recommend this book to anyone looking to make good use of his or her time. I kept reading only in hopes that there would actually be a few pearls of knowledge to be gained. In the end, I wish I had put the book down shortly after reading the great discussion about millionaires and their ancestry. I truly could care less that there is a larger proportion of millionaires from Scottish descent than from Algerian roots. How is this helpful to me??
Don't waste your time reading this book in hopes that you'll come out of it with a great insight into financial well being. It just won't happen. This book seems more like a doctoral thesis gone commercial than a truly useful guide to financial security.
Thanks for your time...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I knew the Millionaire Next Door..., Dec 13 2001
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The book is a kind of research paper. The authors are, after all, academics. They have attempted to provide a "composite" picture, based on extensive research, of the average American Millionaire. What they have found is that such an individual is difficult to identify. In general, though, they are self-employed, hard-working, thrifty, etc. They do not drive expensive cars, live in mansions on golf courses, and wear a Rolexes.

One of the biggest contradictions in the book is this: The authors have found that most millionaires will die rich. But they have also found that most people who inherit great wealth end up as good-for-nothing parasites, rarely accomplishing much in their own lives. My tongue-in-cheek analysis, then, is that these millionaires shoud try to die broke.

The book is filled with statistical information about the habits, professions, and lifestyles of millionaires. At times, the reader will feel somewhat bored as a point is driven into the ground. Overall, though, the book is worth reading. We can all benefit by adopting some of the implied suggestions of this book. Work hard, plan for your retirement, live within your means. Just don't get carried away. Stop and smell the roses from time to time; strive to be rich in experience. When you're on your death-bed, I seriously doubt that you will say, "Gee, I sure wish I'd spent more time at the office." Ask a dying person what they would give for another year or two of life. The answer: everything they have. The sunset on Maui is beautiful. Life is short and precious; enjoy it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Show boys the money!, Feb. 9 2000
By 
Luis Casuso (Lima, Peru) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you belive in using role models to acomplish your goals this will become an excellent tool. The book is packed with detective-detailed facts that are almost emabarrasing to read. But the best starts when the authors chunk these data at the second half of the book. There you will start wondering how to change your live towards making a fortune.
But not everything is a bed of roses. The book can be misleading for young women. The authors don't minimize the millionaires maleism in several chapters of the book. This parts aren't too long but are very strongly stated.
My Advice: take advantage of Amazon's great price, don't even read the cars chapter, and change your lifes! And don't give this book as gift to any young women.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great insight!, Jan. 25 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
A great look at how people with money acquired it. People with money don't waste it trying to impress their neighbours or friends. Wealth is acquired over time through self-control and smart (common-sense) decisions with money.
Don't buy a house with the maximum morgage you can get. Buy modestly.
Never (almost never) buy a vehicle from a car dealer. Buy a second-hand, highly rated vehicle from a motivated seller.

If you're no good with money now, it doesn't matter how big your pay check is - you will still struggle pay cheque to pay cheque. The book has a great example of this.

There is no need to chase riches. If your are smart with your spending, wealth will find you.

I can't recommend this book enough!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Same message repeated ad nauseum, Feb. 13 2004
By 
obediah (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
"The Millionaire Next Door" is basically an outline of the consumption habits of millionaires. The main message of the book is that millionaires are frugal. They don't drive flashy cars, they don't take expensive holidays and they aren't brainwashed by the message to consume, consume, consume.
It's a little ironic that millionaires get that way by not enjoying the trappings of their wealth. There are number of other simple yet powerful messages that the book covers. However, after awhile the book becomes repetitive and boring. The writing style is pedestrian and some of the tables are difficult to decipher.
In a sentence the book says that to become a millionaire, live well below your means. Nothing profound, hardly exciting but absolutely true. I wouldn't recommend this book there are better ones available.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars How to be a millionaire after reading this book, May 8 2003
By 
June (Santa Monica, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This is a novel in which one can learn how to be successful and hopefully one day be their own millionaire. It's a quick read and a very informative book. It's full of typical millionaire stereotypes and how to spot a millionaire in your own neighborhood.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Katie's Review, April 25 2003
By A Customer
I thought the book had a lot of though put into it. There was a lot of interesting facts, but it was all information I already knew. I know that if you want to become wealthy you must get assets and save your money instead of spending it all on material possesions. For some people this is very hard to do. For me it is a very cncept for me to accept: frugality. In my opinion, if you make enough money to buy nice things why not buy them. Why work so hard all your life to save money and hand it all over to your heirs. Now some people don't do that and just make a lot of money so that they may retire early and spend the rest of their life relaxing. Maybe traveling the world. But my whole point is, at least spend what your earn doing what you want as long as you have all of your other financial affairs in order.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Statistical Methodolgy "Questionable" but good Anecdotes, March 4 2003
By A Customer
I like the book in general, but hated the ending. On the VERY LAST PAGE, (the 3rd to last sentence) the authors state ALL their statistical evidence is based on the results from surveys of only 385 "Millionaire families". 385! Do you have any idea of the statistical inaccuracies that can result from such a small sample group? No wonder they buried this piece of information. It would be like a political pollster asking people of conservative area a question, then stating that's how all Americans felt. Plus the way they use the statistics only help to confuse the reader, not make their point.
Their anecdotal evidence is much better. There is a lot to learn from the stories they tell. As a whole, I liked the book. But I never like it when authors try to slip one past me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars This book is not worth buying., Dec 24 2002
By A Customer
I thought this book could have been done in one chapter.
I own this book. The main things this book points out to you are:
1. The average millionaire get rich by owning a business
2. They are very frugal and save every penny.
3. They want their children to be a doctor, lawyer or other high paying professions because they know how hard it is to survive in the business they are in.
Throw in a bunch of statistics and you have the book called "The Milionaire Next Door"
Now that you have already read everything the book has to offer, don't buy it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not really impressed!, April 4 2002
By A Customer
This book was written years ago and although it was ground breaking information then it basically gives statistics and generalities on the rich. Its message about being frugal and investing is repeated in a number of wealth building books. Not worth the hype!
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The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy
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