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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
With "Narcissus in Chains," Laurell K. Hamilton switched her format from blood'n'suspense to sex, blood and endless superpowers for her self-insert, Anita Blake.

And sadly "Cerulean Sins" only continues that tradition, couching a meager plot in endless supernatural sex and increasingly purple prose. But even that might be tolerable if Hamilton's idtastic heroine did not waft through the book, expecting all males to put up with her mood-swings, molestation and manipulation. Think the worst fanfiction Mary Sue ever written by a twelve-year-old Hot Topic shopper.

Anita has just finished a zombie raising when Asher arrives with a message: Belle Morte's emissary Musette has arrived unexpectedly. It turns out that she's come there to toy with Jean-Claude and torment Asher -- and even worse, she intends to use the scarred vampire for her sadistic pleasure. If he isn't the sex partner of a more powerful person, she's free to do it.

However will Anita fix this? By stabbing Musette and hopping in the sack with Asher, of course!

While Anita deals with her deteriorating relationship with the police -- it's their fault rather than hers, of course -- she also must deal with a series of murders, and strange men following her. But the main problem is Belle Morte, who has taken a person interest in Anita -- and whose emissary is still able to cause trouble for Anita's "people." And possibly death for Asher.

Some lip service is paid to a serial killer and a gang of secret agents who, of course, want to enlist Anita's oh-so-impressive services. But that's not where Laurell K. Hamilton's interests lie -- it's pretty clear she is focusing on the endless parade of "who's on top?" vampire politics and all its courtly trappings, and in writing maybe/maybe not sex scenes.

Problem is, she's not very good at it. The supposedly courtly etiquette of the vampires is staggeringly dull, with much hilarious talk of "American sex" (your basic sex) versus "European sex" (just about any kind of physical contact). And the sex scenes require endless before-during-after talking and ridiculous angst. At least two pages are required to get Asher out of his underwear. And her attempts at compelling, intense scenes -- such as the were rescue squad or the long-distance prods of Belle Morte -- end up laughably melodramatic.

Worst of all, no sense of humor -- despite Anita's oh-so-witty barbs, the funniest line in the whole book is Asher announcing that he's known saints and priests who did not have the self-control of a nymphomaniacal narcissist. Add Hamilton's endless descriptions of anime-style flowing hair and brightly-colored eyes, and you have a recipe for tedious, slow-moving slogging.

It's pretty evident that Anita is self-absorbed and not very bright, as well as a glaring Mary Sue with contrived angst and unreal sex powers. Everyone (including the villain and the government) wants her, because she's so tough and special, and despite the fact that she's utterly abrasive and a raging narcissist. Hamilton tries to cover this with protestations that she "loves" all the guys around her, but it's never convincing.

But over the course of "Cerulean Sins" she becomes truly loathsome: emotionally manipulating the vulnerable, endlessly sniping at Richard, and refusing to let Asher leave unless he has sex with her. And while she admits that it's massively hypocritical to insist that Jean-Claude be faithful to her alone while she has sex with anything that will hold still, she insists on it anyway.

Poor Asher. He gets put through the wringer in this one. After being stabbed by an old flame, he has to deal with Anita lying and manipulating him so he'll have "European sex" with her, and apparently not caring how distraught it makes him. The poor guy deserves better.

"Cerulean Sins" is a long, tedious slog of painfully boring sex, painfully boring dialogue, and painfully boring vampire politics that exists just to be talked about. A ghastly experience.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2004
Having begun with Guilty Pleasures and read with constant enjoyment up through the first hundred pages of "Narcissus in Chains", I feel tricked and cheated. I had hoped with the last book that Hamilton would steer the series back on course, and that hope was hideously thwarted. Both "Narcissus in Chains" and "Cerulean Sins" are colossal disappointments for anyone who read for mystery, crime drama--or anything, really, other than sex.
Almost all of the major relationships in these books have been destroyed or relegated to the back burner, and anyone who disagrees with Anita gets pages full of badmouthing. It's tiresome, tedious, poorly plotted, and not much more than an endless and emotionless sexathon. The edge Anita's tangled love life gave the books is gone. The promise of the TRI--the metaphysical and emotional entanglement between Anita, Richard the Ulfric, and the vampire, Jean-Claude--has been destroyed by Anita's unceasing selfishness and incredible demands.
I adored Richard, and Micah, Anita's "soulmate" as introduced in "Narcissus in Chains", is a one dimensional, contrived, gutless wonder, and an absolutely pitiful substitute for the vastly fulfilling Richard and Anita dynamic. He is much more of a Stepford Wife than any kind of believable partner, with only one endowment to recommend him. Fans that look to "Cerulean Sins" for resolution of Richard and Anita's dilemma will be sorely, and bitterly, disappointed. Richard gets little page space, and most of that is spent with Anita's internal wondering of "how long it would be before she hated him." Less time than it takes for the devoted to begin to hate you, Anita.
There are no good aspects of this book. The mystery is underhand, poorly developed, and is more an afterthought than any active device of the plot. It is resolved in a slipshod manner that is to me indicative of Hamilton's poor opinion of her readers. The plot devices are contrived, the vampire villainess less than believable. It is remarkable that a villainess can consume so much page space and still manage to accomplish so little.
Most importantly, as far as being relevatory of Anita's abrupt personality transplant, is the destruction of her relationships with all of the human, or humanish, characters in these books. It is only the characters that embrace Anita no matter what that win Anita's and the author's stamp of approval; Dolph, Ronnie, and Richard in particular have been treated abominably. Dolph was throughout the series a rock, and his breakdown is poorly planned and poorly executed. Anita speaks repeatedly of getting rid of Ronnie, her long-time "best girlfriend," apparently for the dastardly crime of daring to question Anita's lifestyle choices. The characters have been reduced, almost in toto, to poor caricatures of what they once were. It makes for bland and occasionally offensive reading.
With "Narcissus in Chains", I was looking for the book I had somehow missed between pages 100-101. With "Cerulean Sins", I'm looking for the other half of the book that was somehow swallowed up by meaningless automaton sex. The ardeur, which might have had interesting possibilities, is merely a device for Anita to sleep with almost all the main and secondary characters...and the ones Anita managed not to sleep with this time are assured of getting their turn in the next book. I am disgusted with the way the promise of the TRI has been sold out, and disgusted with the author for such sloppy writing. If she can't write two series well, don't try. The readers are getting shortchanged on both ends of the spectrum.
The only way I would consider continuing with this increasingly Anita-worshipping cult of a series is if Anita were to get over her fiance in college, Richard was restored to the man we fell in love with back in "Circus of the Damned", Micah were killed, and the ardeur was relegated to the background it deserved: another need, and not one that we need to hear every detail about fulfilling. I have no problem with sex and violence, but only when they serve the plot. Largely due to the sex, there is, in "Cerulean Sins", not much plot to speak of.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 1, 2010
I was a big fan and kept reading because I kept hoping that LKH would get a good therapist to help her deal with her personal sexual frustrations and get back to writing the stories of the characters she created. Nope. Not going to happen. Each Anita book seems to sink to a new low with total lack of substance and plot. Even worse, LKH seems to be determined to destroy each beloved character piece by piece. She seems to have few tools in her writing tool box: no plot? Insert new power and new sex partner here! Shoddy editing does these books no favours. I've read interviews where the author says she doesn't care what the readers think about the direction her series has taken. It may be her right to write garbage but it's my perogative not to buy it. See you in the bargain bin, Anita. I'm done.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Laurell K. Hamilton is aging well, but her Anita Blake series is not. The eleventh volume of the fantasy-horror series is heavy on supernatural sex and light on plot. While Hamilton comes up with a handful of cool ideas for "Cerulean Sin," her book is sunk by an irritating heroine and a plot relegated to subplot status.

St. Louis is swarming with vampires, werecreatures, and who knows what else. And Anita Blake is in the thick of it, enmeshed with all of the above. Now with her personal life in an uproar, she still has to hunt down a very messy serial killer who can change his shape -- and unfortunately, she's not getting a lot of help from the more typical police authorities.

But things get even more difficult when a sadistic vampire, Musette, arrives and demands that the traumatized Asher come back with her to super-vampire Belle Morte. Since Belle Morte once tormented Asher, Anita ain't about to let him go. So now she has a mystery serial killer, and a very angry ancient vampire on her tail -- things are starting to get a lot worse.

Try reading this book while skipping over the erotica, as I did. I guarantee you'll be done in less than half an hour. Sex is the new supernatural in Hamilton's series, and the actual plot starts slipping into the shadows. Where does the plot go? It gets buried in Anita's many vaguely disturbing and very detailed sexual encounters. To thumb her nose at Belle Morte, is it necessary for Anita to bed Asher? Not really. But it still happens.

Hamilton seems to be on strong footing with some of the plot elements. Super-vampire Belle Morte is quite cool, as is the intricate vampire politics. But really, readers can only take so much of Anita's self-adoration before the narrative gets tiresome. The sex scenes -- it's impossible to miss every page -- are clinical and dull, and the climax is more of a sputter.

Anita herself is the biggest problem -- if she doesn't like someone, she offs them. And she apparently will do the wild thing with any guy who says yes. And everyone adores her, and never disagrees with her. Yeah, she's really easy to relate to -- she's more Mary Sue than Dirty Harry. Her new boyfriend Micah has big body parts but no personality. Richard is the only one of Hamilton's characters who acts like a real person. Despite Hamilton's efforts to convince us that he's crazy, it's hard not to sympathize with the poor guy.

"Cerulean Sins" is more of a sickly blue annoyance. Hamilton's eleventh Blake book is a collection of vague narcissism, riddled with weird sex and weirder characters. An exercise in mediocrity.
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With "Narcissus in Chains," Laurell K. Hamilton switched her format from blood'n'suspense to sex, blood and endless superpowers for her self-insert, Anita Blake.

And sadly "Cerulean Sins" only continues that tradition, couching a meager plot in endless supernatural sex and increasingly purple prose. But even that might be tolerable if Hamilton's idtastic heroine did not waft through the book, expecting all males to put up with her mood-swings, molestation and manipulation. Think the worst fanfiction Mary Sue ever written by a twelve-year-old Hot Topic shopper.

Anita has just finished a zombie raising when Asher arrives with a message: Belle Morte's emissary Musette has arrived unexpectedly. It turns out that she's come there to toy with Jean-Claude and torment Asher -- and even worse, she intends to use the scarred vampire for her sadistic pleasure. If he isn't the sex partner of a more powerful person, she's free to do it.

However will Anita fix this? By stabbing Musette and hopping in the sack with Asher, of course!

While Anita deals with her deteriorating relationship with the police -- it's their fault rather than hers, of course -- she also must deal with a series of murders, and strange men following her. But the main problem is Belle Morte, who has taken a person interest in Anita -- and whose emissary is still able to cause trouble for Anita's "people." And possibly death for Asher.

Some lip service is paid to a serial killer and a gang of secret agents who, of course, want to enlist Anita's oh-so-impressive services. But that's not where Laurell K. Hamilton's interests lie -- it's pretty clear she is focusing on the endless parade of "who's on top?" vampire politics and all its courtly trappings, and in writing maybe/maybe not sex scenes.

Problem is, she's not very good at it. The supposedly courtly etiquette of the vampires is staggeringly dull, with much hilarious talk of "American sex" (your basic sex) versus "European sex" (just about any kind of physical contact). And the sex scenes require endless before-during-after talking and ridiculous angst. At least two pages are required to get Asher out of his underwear. And her attempts at compelling, intense scenes -- such as the were rescue squad or the long-distance prods of Belle Morte -- end up laughably melodramatic.

Worst of all, no sense of humor -- despite Anita's oh-so-witty barbs, the funniest line in the whole book is Asher announcing that he's known saints and priests who did not have the self-control of a nymphomaniacal narcissist. Add Hamilton's endless descriptions of anime-style flowing hair and brightly-colored eyes, and you have a recipe for tedious, slow-moving slogging.

It's pretty evident that Anita is self-absorbed and not very bright, as well as a glaring Mary Sue with contrived angst and unreal sex powers. Everyone (including the villain and the government) wants her, because she's so tough and special, and despite the fact that she's utterly abrasive and a raging narcissist. Hamilton tries to cover this with protestations that she "loves" all the guys around her, but it's never convincing.

But over the course of "Cerulean Sins" she becomes truly loathsome: emotionally manipulating the vulnerable, endlessly sniping at Richard, and refusing to let Asher leave unless he has sex with her. And while she admits that it's massively hypocritical to insist that Jean-Claude be faithful to her alone while she has sex with anything that will hold still, she insists on it anyway.

Poor Asher. He gets put through the wringer in this one. After being stabbed by an old flame, he has to deal with Anita lying and manipulating him so he'll have "European sex" with her, and apparently not caring how distraught it makes him. The poor guy deserves better.

"Cerulean Sins" is a long, tedious slog of painfully boring sex, painfully boring dialogue, and painfully boring vampire politics that exists just to be talked about. A ghastly experience.
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on May 30, 2004
In the beginning we had Anita BLake Vampire Hunter. Now we have Anita Blake erotica and not any good at that. In the first few books she was human, a necromancer, had a clue, and some issues. The character was almost/relatively believable and somewhat likable. In 11 books none of the characters in the series have developed, the ones even remotely developed have been totally lobotomized in this book. Anita Blake is no longer a believable or even remotely likable protagonist that anyone can relate to at all. Just a super selfish superhuman witch who'll do anything to have what she wants and do anything or say anything to get it. The self aggrandizing prose of the protagonist(Anita) is enough to make you laugh, so there is humor in it. There is no romance to me in a book where I despise the lead and think she herself is the joke. This book is all about bedding this one and that one with a very lame excuse to do so. It's predictable to follow so there is no plot. Even though these books are listed under romance, the books in this series once had plots and were romantic. This book has neither a plot or any kind of believable or even reasonable romance to it at all. Even the sex is a joke, everybody loves Anita to the extreme. It is badly editted, tons of typos and run on sentences. This book like the last one insulted me as a former fan and as a person it insulted my inteligence. I want my money back.
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on March 9, 2004
Here we go again!
Ok, I'll try to keep this brief. Ms. Hamilton, you've managed to thoroughly destroy the character of Anita Blake. With Merry Gentry, we knew we were getting sex, amoral morons, and really ridiculous amounts of the supernatural.
Sadly, you have decided that this is the direction in which Anita Blake must travel as well. Which is a shame. Anita had conflict, Ania evolved, and Anita was a person. Now Anita, JC, Richard, et al, are simply charicatures of a once-enjoyable series. The only character experiencing any growth is Jason.
What could have been an abolutely amazing and mind-blowing plot was relegated to a few parts of the book. What bugs me is that the publisher had the audacity to state that this was a main part of the book. Please, don't insult my intelligence! <sigh> Instead we get a shot to the head in the middle of a mall food court. <Yawn>
Anita spent sooo much time griping about the lack of morals of everyone around her, she failed to notice that she doesn't have a whole lot left herself. Part of Anita's charm was the fact that things like her faith or a stuuffed penguin or her boyfriend could be her refuge, her sanctuary from the big, bad world. And the struggle to keep from becoming Edward was a huge plus. There was passion, and drama, and well, everything this book lacked.
First, enough with the ardeur and the sex. It's tedious, boring, and dull. Do we really need to read about Anit'as sex-capades? NO. This whole ardeur/incubus/succubus thing could have been handled much less graphically. And with better writing and more effort on LKH's part. Instead, we get the lazy attempt which is this book.
Second, Micah needs to be shot. So do the following characters: Nathan, the wereleopards, the werewolves (I think that's enough). Oh, and please stake Jean Claude, Damien, and Asher. Then please put Anita out of our misery. Probably the only way to save the series.
Third: What happened to Animators, Inc.? Where are the fun bunch from there? The human element of Anita's life? What happened to Ronnie? Burt? Anita's zombie-raising red-headed trainee? His wife? Their kid? C'mon, all these perfectly good characters going to utter waste.
Fourth: Resolve the Dolph sitch. Or spend more time on it. It was handled very poorly. Period.
Fifth: Enough with the "Super-Anita". Able to make all men love her, constantly develops new powers through judicious use of the sadly overused "deus ex machina", etc. I understand that Anita has to grow and evolve as a person, Animator, triumverate member, pard leader, werewolf enforcer, girlfriend to the Master of the City, Federal Marshall on all things supernatural, and I think that about covers it. Too much going on, LKH!
What this book needs is for most of te characters to be cut. There is talk that Edward will be returning, and hopefully that's with enough grenades to take out the Circus of the Damned, the Thronnos Rokke Clan, the Blooddrinker Clan, and any spare freaks left laying around. LKH, you've gone completely over-the-top, and I'm not sure how you plan to resolve this. Or are you just laughing all the way to the bank as we, your fans, spend out well-earned cash on this literary masturbation?
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on March 8, 2004
I am a big-time Anita Blake fan. Yes I am one of those who waits with anticipation for her newest novel. From my first reading of Guilty Pleasures I was hooked. I was still very happy novels 2 through 4. Novels 5 through 8 started to become whiny and melodramatic, but I hung in there, hoping the newest addition to the series would improve. I AM DONE! This is my last Anita Blake Novel! I not only spent my hard earned $22.95 plus tax to purchase this novel, but used my free time to read this smut.
Now where do I begin? First there is our hero Anita Blake. Imagine a comic superhero gone wrong. Give this superhero the attributes of Superman, throw in all the skills of the entire X-Men cast and the strength of the Incredible Hulk. Now take this overblown superhero and then try to turn it into a workable character. Well you have Anita Blake in a nutshell. She has now become a twisted cartoon character from hell. And if that is not bad enough, a miserable whinny, self-centered cartoon character from hell.
Anita Blake, who is not only the best necromancer in the world (she not only raises full cemetaries of zombies with the wave of her hand, but can raise sleeping hundred year old vampires with another wave of her hand). Take that and add the fact that she is part of a very powerful triumverate which gives her more power than most of the other powerful creatures who are working alone. On top of this, she is becoming a master vampire with her very own little vampire follower. Now throw into this mix, the fact that she is the queen of the wereleopards, and has her very own wereleopard pard that follows her around with devotion (even though she can't change into a complete wereleopard. I'm still not done! She is also the assigned enforcer for the werewolves. Now you have the new and improved Anita Blake on steroids. (Is she going to grow a penis soon I wonder or is it already there and coming about in a future novel?)
Take this overblown cartoon character and now throw in all her followers which include: (1) a pack of wereleopards who spend entire novels on their hands and knees just to rub against her and acknowledge her for being a mini cartoon god. (2) the enforcer for the werewolves (because even though the werewolves are a powerful race in their own right, there is not one other werewolf in the entire world who has the power to fill this job which of course makes the werewolves fear her. (3) Throw in her necromancer/zombie raising skills which make vampires tremble at her feet (I mean she can raise you from your coffin with the wave of her tiny little hand) and finally (4) don't forget she is also Ms. 5'3" commando unit with her own set of guns with silver bullets that she can spray and kill you with if you look at her wrong. Who could handle this much power? Only Ms. Anita Blake, sterioid super hero extraordinaire!
Now that the main chracter is set, you get to watch her interact with all the other characters in this book. Please note all characters are one-dimensional so therefore not worth naming, and there are only three types of chracters in the novels anyway: (1) Powerful Men that Anita is having sex with (this of course includes orgies but not anal sex because she is a lady); (2) Male characters who want to sleep with Anita; and (3) a couple of male characters who do not have the privilege of sleeping with Anita at the moment. Of course, these two chracters have the most problems.
Now describing these one-dimensional characters in more depth. First there are the most powerful men in the book (master vampires hundreds of years old) who follow Anita like puppets on a string, waiting for her every command because they can't make her angry or she won't have sex with them.
Then you have the characters who Anita sleeps with as one night stands who follow her around and worship her hoping they get to have sex with her more than once. Of course, there are the other male characters who want to have sex with Anita, but because she's having sex with everyone else in the book, have to worship her without the sex. Still like dutiful one dimensional characters, they follow her around like puppets and give in to her every whim. Then there are the last set of characters who are not having sex with her at the moment and do not worship her. And, in this entire Anita Blake world of course it only amounts to two people. Now because they do not worship her and are not having sex with her, of course they have to be either a suicidal depressed werewolf who wants to die because he can't have sex with Anita, and a racist psychotic cop.
So for over 400 pages you get to watch Anita have sex, have group sex, walk around naked, and then have more sex. You also get to listen to her whine about her life and her moral values and then you get to watch her have more sex. While all of the powerful vampires and weres follow her around and listen to her whine. Still, don't piss Anita off, or she'll pull out a gun and shoot you with a silver bullet. Vampire writing at its best!
Now I know this is a long shot, but do you think somewhere in this world of Anitas there is a manufacturer out there that maybe has a second gun with silver bullets that someone in the novel can buy and go on a hunting spree and kill every chracter in this series and then shoot his or herself in the head so this depressing sickening waste of paper and space series can end!!!! Good bye Anita I will miss the woman I met in Guilty Pleasures, but there are too many good authors out there for me to waste additional money and free time on you. Adieu!
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on October 29, 2003
Cerulean Sins by Laurell K. Hamilton is the last Anita Blake I will read. Very few times have I not finished a book, but all I could do with this is skim the last half. I couldn't get past all of the gratuitous sex, the "I am so...," and the whining. They have steadily become less action and more sex and sex and well, sex. The sex passages are simply absurd. Anita Blake's language is that of a 13 year old rather than a college educated professional. It is as if LKH is trying to make the books more "hip" but it just comes off as silly. Her internal whining is tedious. It appears that the only way to save her male friends is to have sex with them, which she appears to do with frightening predictibility. There are no females in the book other than psychopathic vampires or angsty female cops. Why can't there be a werewolf or vampire, or for that matter a human, that isn't a stereotypical female? The attempt to make the books more literary by quoting poetry is wasted. This is a disappointment as I enjoyed the first few books in the series, they certainly weren't great literature, but they were very entertaining.
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on July 3, 2003
I was not one of those who read Narcissus in Chains and then immediately jumped back in horror. Sure, LKH had managed to surprise me with the unexpected twists, but i thought that it was not too below her usual caliber. And so, i was willing to read Cerulean Sins.

I was glad to see Zerbrowski and the other cops, but i disliked how LKH changed Dolph into a hulking, vampire-hating pain. That just really annoyed me. And i'm not too happy about Anita's numerous bed partners.
but that wasn't the worst part. the worst part was how much paper and space LKH wasted with anita's angst. every other page was filled with, "No, i can't have sex with all these men... But i have to, the munin and JC's sex hunger forces me to do it... Oh, my goodness, i can't believe i just did that... Oh screw it, i'm gonna do what the hell i want to do... Oh wait, did i really just do that?" Halfway through the book, i honestly had a headache from the way anita battered her situation from all sides mentally. i mean, at least in the Merry Gentry series, paper isn't wasted on how internally uncertain she feels about sleeping with all the men. she accepts it as something she has to do.
Not only that, but most of the action/plot in the novel was basically present only in the last...fifty or so pages. And they were not soooo good that i was willing to forgive the not so likable parts of the book.
for me, the anita blake series ends at Obsidian Butterfly. I highly doubt that i'll be willing to venture into any new AB books again.
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