Customer Reviews


237 Reviews
5 star:
 (126)
4 star:
 (48)
3 star:
 (28)
2 star:
 (12)
1 star:
 (23)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it.
I loved this book. Grammar is hardly something the normal person would think to be interesting, especially in book form. This is truely one of a kind. Lynne Truss has such a great way with witty and intelligent humor. I would recommend it to anyone! Besides, I've just about had it with seeing grammar mistakes all over the place.
Published on June 2 2004 by Jenny

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misleading and not funny
For Americans, _Eats, Shoots and Leaves_ has a serious, fundamental flaw: it models the English style of punctuation, which differs in a number of ways from the American style as exemplified in the Chicago Manual of Style. Those who follow Ms. Truss's teaching will, perhaps unknowingly, violate American rules of grammar, punctuation, and style. In addition, the book is...
Published on May 31 2004


‹ Previous | 1 224 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it., June 2 2004
By 
Jenny (Providence, RI, USA) - See all my reviews
I loved this book. Grammar is hardly something the normal person would think to be interesting, especially in book form. This is truely one of a kind. Lynne Truss has such a great way with witty and intelligent humor. I would recommend it to anyone! Besides, I've just about had it with seeing grammar mistakes all over the place.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stickler's Unite!, May 7 2004
By 
Lynne Truss has written a marvelously entertaining book in "Eats, Shoots & Leaves-The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation." She tells us that punctuation marks are the traffic
signals of language.
Lynne Truss believes that she was born with a seventh-sense. She is a "stickler" for proper punctuation. Most of us are happily equipped to live in a world of plummeting punctutation standards. We would be the ones to whisper to ourselves, "Oh, get a life!" Lynne Truss believes it is her right, and,indeed, her duty to inform one when their punctution is not correct. She cannot live in a world of constant shock. She lives a tough life, and at times cannot bear to get up in the mornings. Everywhere there are signs of indifference and ignorance. At every point Lynne Truss gives us examples of her everyday shock, and how she tries to right it.
Lynne Truss started out as a literary editor. She is the author of three novels and many radio comedy dramas. She spent six years as the television critic of the "The Times" (London) followed by four years as the sports columnist. She now reviews books for "The Sunday Times" (London), and is heard regularly on
BBC radio 4.
Lynne Truss relates how she came to title her book.
A panda walks into a cafe. he orders a sandwich, eats it, then draws a gun and fires two shots in the air. "Why" asks the confused waiter, as the panda makes toward the exit. The panda produces a badly punctuated wildlife manual and tosses it over his shoulder. "I'm a panda, he says at the door. "Look it up." The waiter turns to the relevant entry and, sure enough, finds an explanation.
"Panda. Large black-and-white bear-like mammal, native to China. Eats, shoots and leaves."
So, punctuation really does matter, even if it is only occasionally a matter of life and death.
I am a little afraid to continue the review, in fear that I may unintentionally "shock" the author. Lynne Truss has a reverence for the apostrophe. Several chapters of this small, highly charged, book are dedicated to the apostrophe. And, later on, the comma makes its appearance in a chapter titled, "That'll Do,Comma." The comma has seventeen rules for its use. Didn't know that, did you? In the chapter, Airs and Graces, she reviews the colon and the semi colon, and how they have come to be looked at as pretentious punctuation. The author believes that one of the most profound thigns ever said about punctuation came from the Oxford University Press. "If you take hypens seriously, you will surely go mad." People have argued for its aboliton for many years. In the fianl chapter, Lynne Truss discusses the Internet, God Help Us! Will the end of the book be in sight? Will emoticons change punctuation forever? Read this book, so highly recommended and find out! Prisrob
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Punctuation with Humour, Feb. 6 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Eats, Shoots and Leaves (Paperback)
Too many of us have forgotten how to use punctuation correctly and may not appreciate how it impacts on meaning.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining romp through English grammer, uh, grammar, June 23 2004
I remember a long time ago seeing a headline in a paper that read "Milk Drinkers Turning to Powder." This is the kind of English that really sets off Lynne Truss. I saw an interview with her on television, and while she had a sense of humor, and that is apparent from the book, she also had a very serious side, and I was sure that for certain grammatical errors she would not hesitate to shoot and leave!
The title of this book comes from the kind of problem that people can encounter in the difference between spoken language and written language. Being a fan of poetry, I am very aware of the difference between spoken words and written words on the page, and what a difference simple intonations and voice changes can make. Punctuation and spelling can make a big difference, too. Is it here, or hear? Here here! or Hear! Hear! There are lots of arguments for the need for correct grammar and punctuation, and there are lots of pieces in here that talk about the history and misuse in the past of punctuation in key times.
This is a very British book in many senses, and some of the American rules of grammar are different, but it is still fun to read and see what happens with the differences. Truss has a dry wit and this comes through most of the time fairly well. There were times I did laugh quite a bit, and times I copied things down to email to friends.
This is a fun book. You won't want to leave it behind, eating or shooting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Read it first in London, June 20 2004
By 
Kelly Theodor (Slinger, WI United States) - See all my reviews
I read the British version of this book first, and I have to say, it's funnier in its "original language." I never thought a book on punctuation would be funny, but after reading an excerpt in a British newspaper, I made a special trip out to buy it. I was laughing out loud the whole way home while reading it on the plane.
I suppose the book is not funny if you don't think there's anything wrong with misplaced punctuation, but if you do, this book is a treat!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Nice to see a book on punctuation at the top of Amazon, June 2 2004
As a book publisher, it is wonderful to see a book on punctuation at the top of Amazon'a list. Must be more writers out there than we thought.
Eric Bollinger
McKenna Publishing Group
Publisher of Jim Woods' "Two Dozen Lessons From an Editor"
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Let's hear it for grammar snobs!, May 26 2004
As one who was taught grammar the old-fashioned way by diagramming sentences in the fifth grade, I cringe every time I see such gems as "Every dog has it's day", signs advertising "apple's" and "orange's", the interminable misuse of their, there and they're, people acting like they never heard of past participles (a sign in a community center near my office exhorts the kids to "Stay strong, stay focus"), and the confusion of words that sound alike but mean totally different things, such as residents and residence. Do residence live in the residents? Believe it or not, I've actually seen this written.
One wonders if they actually teach grammar in the schools any more. Given some of the notes I've read written by teachers to parents, it's doubtful. I've seen teachers whose own grammar skills were so poor they wouldn't recognize the most flagrant grammatical errors if they were written in letters four inches high. So Lynne Truss's book is long overdue for the hordes (not hoards) of the grammar-impaired. (Yes, simply moving or omitting a comma can totally change the meaning of a sentence. Try these three: "Eats, shoots and leaves"; "Eats shoots and leaves", and "Eats shoots, and leaves".)
The book is short, concise and very much to the point. Unfortunately, it will probably be read and enjoyed only by those who already get the joke in the title.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Enjoyable Conversation with Ms Truss, April 15 2004
This was an absolutely delightful read. I felt as tho' Ms Truss had popped in for a visit, and we were having a totally enjoyable discussion about those minor (and not so minor) annoyances one encounters when reading newspapers, signs, etc., or when one has to read more than once to make sense of a particular phrase. It is not a nitty-picky book, just an "oh! yes! - and did you see such-and-such?" type of chat.
Neither Ms Truss nor I are obsessed with punctuation, but every once in a while, one does become upset and wonders if some editor was asleep at the wheel.
I am really glad this book has just been launched in Canada, and I would say that her examples are equally applicable to the UK, the USofA, Canada, and probably wherever English is written.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Friendly Read, June 21 2005
I picked this book up after seeing the book shoot up the best seller list. I figured if a book on punctuation could be a number one best seller, then I should probably give it a read; and I am happy to report that I was not disappointed.
The author does a great job of writing about punctuation and explaining why certain things (like the missing comma in Two Weeks Notice) drive her batty. Batty to the point of advocating those legions of punctuation devotees get themselves sets of commas and apostrophes, and enter into the world to rid it of all the bad grammar that is taking place out there.
For anyone who has been annoyed to see things spelt incorrectly or witnessed first hand the poor use of grammar that gets put on street signs and advertisement, this book is definitely up your alley. And for those of us, like me, who just want a good comical read this book is definitely a must have too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Entertaining, July 10 2004
By 
Westley (Stuck in my head) - See all my reviews
"Eats, Shoots & Leaves" is not a grammar guide per se, as it doesn't really teach the basics of punctuation. Instead, it's a grammarians dream come true - an enjoyable and illuminating discussion of the history and importance of punctuation (Hmmmm, did I use that dash correctly?). Lovers of punctuation have been decrying the use of "netspeak" with no or minimal punctuation. Accordingly, Truss wrote this engaging book with the rallying cry: "Sticklers unite!" However, Truss does not simply attack the web; indeed, she asserts that text messaging and email have made reading more important than it has been of late. However, to paraphrase Bill Clinton, "It's the punctuation stupid!"
Truss's dry British wit (e.g., talking about wanting to marry the inventor of the colon) is used to great effect in her writing. And amusing vignettes are peppered through the text, including the introduction of the "interrobang" as well as the spread of the "Strukenwhite" virus. She even manages to make punctuation seem, well, sexy. If you've ever found yourself in a spirited debate about the Oxford comma (i.e., the second comma in the phrase "red, white, and blue"), then you'll likely enjoy this book.
Some reviewers have asserted that American readers may be a bit lost; however, Truss is careful about pointing out American versus British punctuation uses. I was never confused. Overall, this book is delightful - most highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 224 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Eats, Shoots and Leaves
Eats, Shoots and Leaves by Lynne Truss (Paperback - April 11 2006)
CDN$ 17.00 CDN$ 12.27
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews