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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What an Adventure
The book starts out with Tom Sawyer, a mischievous boy, just trying to have fun. He plays hooky on a Friday and then has to work on Saturday because his Aunt Polly finds out. Tom doesn't want to work so he convinces other kids to take the privilege of doing his work for him. He even persuades the kids to give him something so they can work for him.

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Published on Oct. 22 2006 by man

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3.0 out of 5 stars The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
In the novel The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer, is about a boy who is adventurous and does not care what people think about him. Tom Sawyer is 12/13 years old who lives in Mississippi in pre-civil war times. Tom and his best friend Huck go to a graveyard t bury a dead cat and see Injun Joe with Muff Potter stabs Doc.Robinson then Injun Joe sees Tom and Huck in the graveyard,...
Published on June 10 2003


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What an Adventure, Oct. 22 2006
The book starts out with Tom Sawyer, a mischievous boy, just trying to have fun. He plays hooky on a Friday and then has to work on Saturday because his Aunt Polly finds out. Tom doesn't want to work so he convinces other kids to take the privilege of doing his work for him. He even persuades the kids to give him something so they can work for him.

As the book continues, Tom becomes interested in Becky Thatcher, the daughter of Judge Thatcher. Their relationship doesn't work out so Tom becomes friends with Huckleberry Finn. They decide to go to the graveyard one night to find a cure for warts, instead the witness the murder of Dr. Robinson by the Native American Injun Joe. Tom and Huck are so scared that they run away and exchange blood to make an oath that they will never tell anybody about the murder. The murderer Injun Joe blames the murder on Muff Potter, an unlucky drunk. Tom now feels guilty that Potter is arrested instead of the real killer, but doesn't do anything about it.

Tom, Huck, and Joe, another friend, decide to run to an island and be pirates. They are just boys that want to try new adventures and have fun. However, when they are gone, all of their loved ones think they are dead so they have a funeral. The boys noticed how much their relatives missed them that they come to their funeral. The community is very happy to see them back, and all their friends think that they are heroes. When the murder trial comes around, Tom decides to testify about what he saw, and Injun Joe runs out of the courtroom. During the summer, Tom and Huck go looking for buried treasure and see Injun Joe hiding treasure in a house. Injun Joe sees Tom and Huck's shovels and decides not to bury the treasure there. Huck watches Injun Joe every night to try and get the treasure. He then over hears Injun Joe's plan to attack the Widow Douglas. Huck then runs for help to stop any violence.

Tom becomes better friends with Betty, and they both go into a cave and get lost. They are lost for a couple of days and are out of food. They run into Injun Joe who is using the cave as a hideout. Tom finally finds a way out and Betty's dad, Judge Thatcher, locks the cave so Injun Joe starves to death. After about a week, Tom and Huck go back into the cave and get the treasure. Huck is adopted by the Widow Douglas who he saved earlier.

The author kept me interested by keeping the plot going and going. Once you thought that Injun Joe was caught, he escaped. I like the story that the author tells. It is an adventure of an imaginative boy who is not afraid to do anything. I don't think this book is very unique because it ends with a happy ending.

Tom's family is pretty normal for that time period. His family consists of a mischievous boy, a caring but discipline guardian, a mean half-brother, and a close to perfect cousin. The author tries to make this book as realistic as possible so the characters are believable. For example, Huckleberry Finn is a believable character because he has a drunk as a father and has a lot of freedom. I think that Injun Joe is a very memorable character because he is a murderer. The author made me care about the characters by putting them in bad situations. For example, I cared about Tom when he was stuck in the cave and couldn't get out.

The theme in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer has to deal with Tom maturing throughout the book. In the beginning, Tom was an imaginative boy that made childish pranks and got him and others in trouble. However, by the end of the book Tom was putting other peoples concerns above his. For instance, Tom took the blame for the book that Becky ripped. He also testified in court for Injun Joe's trial. Tom changed from a little boy to a growing man in his maturity level. I think that the author did a good job of achieving this message by setting Tom up to change drastically.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A return to childhood., June 18 2004
By 
Atheen M. Wilson "Atheen" (Mpls, MN United States) - See all my reviews
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Although I have always enjoyed Mark Twain's work--his Diary of Adam and Eve is one of my favorites--I've never read Tom Sawyer. Recently I found a small book from the Barnes-Nobel collector's library and decided to read it. That particular issue is probably not the best to use, especially for a first introduction because it is badly edited and exhibits an inordinant number of spelling errors and misplaced words. Certainly for a volume one will use for quotations in any paper one writes a better copy, like the one above, would be more desireable.

Despite his depression in later years, Mark Twain captures the sly sense of humor and dry wit that is a characteristic of American humorous writers: O'Henry and Will Rogers, among them. This is well illlustrated in Tom Sawyer, a novel about being a kid, not just in the 1880s but any time. Twain gets right into the heart and mind of childhood, it's myths, superstitions, trials and victories, even it's great philosophies: "He had discovered a great law of human action, without knowing it, namely, that in order to make a man or a boy covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain (p. 25)." (The latter a gloss on the whitewashing of Aunt Polly's fence.)
Truly a Twain and truly a joy.
For THOSE WRITING PAPERS: in English literature. How might Twain stack up against a modern humorist? What types of things make this a "dated" work? Why does that datedness appeal to many readers. How is Tom like modern children? Mark Twain was an adult when he wrote the book. Do you think that that fact makes the story less about a child and how he views the world and more about how an adult remembers being a child? Watch a film about Tom Sawyer. How has Hollywood reworked the story? Does seeing some of Tom's adventures help one enjoy them more? Or does getting "inside his head" through the book make it more enjoyable?
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5.0 out of 5 stars For Boys and Girls Aged Eight to Ninety, June 14 2004
By 
Paul McGrath (Sacramento, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
If you're reading this review and expect to find some new insight or original thought as it has to do with this great book, don't. Because there is no way I'm going to be able to add anything to the thousands of things already written about it. What I instead aim to do is to get you to read the thing, if in case you already haven't. (There, see, here I go imitating the darn thing, and an awful job of it too, no doubt.)
The first thing I would tell you is that the book is an "adventure," which, well, you've probably already figured out, that word being in the title and everything. The point is, the plot just rollicks along, with Tom and Huck witnessing a murder, running away from home, and finding a buried treasure. So if that's all you're interested in--a good plot--well, here you go. Okay, okay, it's maybe just a tiny little bit improbable, especially the treasure part, but again, it's an adventure and it'll keep you on the edge of your seat and don't let this stop you.
The next thing that's real good about this novel is that it almost perfectly captures boyhood: the wild swings between joy and despair; the bravado of confrontation; the excitement of sneaking out at night; the pretending to be cowboys and pirates; the fascination with bugs and dead cats; the monotony of school and church; and the constant, never-ending, daily conflict between doing the right thing and the wrong thing. All of this is familiar to anyone--boy or girl but particularly boy--who has had the happy experience of being a young human-being in America.
What's also great is the way the book captures time and place, giving us a rare glimpse into a rural America that existed a hundred and sixty years ago. A rural America in which an apple--or for that matter an apple CORE--was a real treat. Tom has two sets of clothes: the ones he wears every day of his life, and the "other" ones, those he wears on Sundays. Nobody, and I mean NOBODY, wears shoes during the summer. Here is a description of the village "pariah," Huck Finn, the first time we meet him: "Huckleberry was always dressed in the cast-off clothes of full-grown men, and they were in perennial bloom and fluttering with rags. His hat was a vast ruin with a wide crescent lopped out of its brim; his coat, when he wore one, hung nearly to his heels . . . ; but one suspender supported his trousers; the seat of his trousers bagged low and contained nothing . . ." You get the idea. The wayward son of the town drunk was "idle," "lawless," "vulgar" and "bad." Naturally, all the boys looked up to him.
The book is also ridiculously funny, but I guess I'm not going to go into that. Look. There's nothing more for me to say. If you haven't read this book, then do it. Not because some teacher told you to, or because you've been told it's grand literature or some other such nonsense, or, God forbid, you think you might learn something. Hang it, you need to read this for no other reason than that the book is just plain old fun. Why, I've read it about ten times over the years and I still think it's fun. In fact, more so maybe than the first time I read it. So there. Nothing more, nothing less, and let's just leave it at that.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Twain's use of satire in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, May 16 2004
By 
Ben (Colorado USA) - See all my reviews
In this book, the author, Mark Twain shows his insights into humanity by portraying them through the eyes of a naive young boy. Twain shows the flaws in humans by nature and also the good side of humans. The flaws are more of a focus in this book in my opinion, flaws that are poked at by satire. Many things, everyday things, are turned into a satire in this book. Although some things are blatantly made fun of, the literary device of satire is one used most often to do so. Things that are part of everyday peoples' lives, such as religion, are portrayed in a comical spoof way. The feeling that Twain had a bad experience with organized religion is one that every reader should get from the text. Or, perhaps it is his belief that organized religion is for those superficial and shallow. The kind of people that are insecure about what other people think of them, so since others are going to church and getting involved they will too. I feel the same way that Twain does about this such thing. All in all, his use of this literary device strengthens the book, giving it not only substance but entertainment value. Twain is able to take a random and normal setting and make it special to the reader. Set in early southern 1900's America, a place where not very much went on, he took the life of a young boy and made it entertaining, good literature. Tom Sawyer, a typical misbehaved young boy growing up through grade school, is the protagonist of this book. Twain makes him a literary character that one can never forget, a simple character, yet one that will always parallel someone that one may encounter. This book is filled with many unforgettable characters, such as Tom, Aunt Polly, and Huck. Twain is undoubtedly one of the best American writers that has yet to write, many of his writing styles and techniques have been the basis of many other stories. He wrote at a time where fantasy was almost not appropriate. The status quo of literature was one that showed the real truths of life, this most likely because of the aftermath of the Civil War. This period of American literature is called Realism, because there was no fantasy, there was no romanticism and there was no outrageous fiction. People wanted to see the cold hard truth in that grim time. A country always has to grieve after such a thing as a war, and it is a process. From this process of grieving we were given the period of realism. Twain was, and is, the most popular author of this period, because his writing was simple, yet so entertaining. In this particular book, he used many literary devices to strengthen his text. All throughout the book Tom is portrayed vividly in the reader's imagination, reminding us all of simpler times. Twain's satire of this period is humorous and enjoying to read. Twain pokes fun at the popular things of his time such as, convention and proper etiquette. The literary device of satire backs Twain's text and enhances the reading experience of the book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Tom Sawyer, March 29 2004
By A Customer
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain is a wonderful book about a young mischievous boy growing up in Missouri in the late 1800's. It is a fun novel to read. You will never be bored and you will never grow tired of the adventures Tom has. He plays hooky, imitates Robin Hood and learns to have fun with what he has. He has adventure after adventure. He tricks kids to whitewash a fence that he was supposed to be whitewashing. He lives on his own for a while on an island pretending to be pirates. He witnesses a murder and releases the truth about the killer at the trail. The killer is shut in a cave and dies of starvation. Tom and Huck find his treasure, that they seen him hide one night, and claim it as their own.
Mark Twain is an excellent author. He makes all of the characters believable and seem as if that was you in your early childhood. Tom is a well-built character; he is fun and sees everything through a child point of view, which is what the reader sees because Tom is telling the story. Huck is the boy that everybody looks up to and that the boy that everybody wants to be. Overall this book was a great book that kept me reading it and wanting to read more.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, March 18 2004
By A Customer
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is a very tricky book. It portrays the image of a child's novel, when in fact it is an equally great read for adults. Yes, it is a story of childhood, but it inspires adventure for the young, and revives it for the old. Something that everyone needs to do.
Murder. It's a serious thing no matter what age you are. Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn both knew this when they witnessed the homicide of Dr. Robinson while they were attempting to rid themselves of warts at the town graveyard. Injun Joe committed the murder, but he took advantage of Muff Potter's drunkenness and Muff gets blamed for the crime. Tom and Huck decide to swear by an oath of blood that they will never tell a soul, but when it finally comes down to it, Tom breaks the oath in order to testify that Muff is innocent and that Injun Joe was the real culprit.
Unfortunately, Joe escapes from the courthouse in the nick of time and Tom and Huck begin to fear for their lives. In this fright, they run away for quite a long time, and the townsfolk start believing that they're dead. One night, Tom sneaks back to his house. As he's peaking through the window, and finds his Aunt Polly weeping over him with sorrow. He realizes that he should come back home, and he happens to return on the day of his funeral, surprising everyone. Now that he's become the envy of the town, his former love, Becky Thatcher, takes a liking to him again, and they get lost in a cave together. While the two children's families' search for them, Tom and Becky stumble across Injun Joe hiding out in the cave. With a lot of luck, they make it out of the cave as fast as they can, escaping Injun Joe once again. The town closes the cave up when they find out that Joe is stashing himself inside and he dies of starvation.
Mark Twain disguised this book as a simple story, but its crafty slang and emotionally stirring power tells me otherwise. Reading about a serious, horrific event such as murder, through the eyes of a young trouble-making boy, is a perspective that will bring out the child in everyone, no matter what age they are and no matter what they're expecting the book to be like.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Complete and unabridged, March 4 2004
I recently learned that there are some "sanitized" versions of "Tom Sawyer" out there and almost blew a gasket. YOO-HOO, SOMEBODY!! ONE DOES NOT "SANITIZE" MARK TWAIN! Putting out a bowdlerized version of Tom Sawyer is an abomination on the level of "colorizing" vintage films. "Tom Sawyer" is a classic that should be read uncut and uncontaminated. Twain is an American legend, who created in his eponymous hero an American icon, and as if Tom himself were not enough, Twain went even further and introduced us in these pages to the incomparable Huckleberry Finn. Is there anyone who has read "Tom Sawyer" who hasn't on some level identified with its hero? Tom is a lovable rogue, an incurable romantic who has to deal with his loving and nagging Aunt Polly, chafes under the constraints of school and its tyrannical headmaster, cons his friends into whitewashing Aunt Polly's fence (probably the best loved chapter in the book), runs away with Huck and turns up safe and sound at his own funeral, saves a condemned man's life, and like every other red-blooded American boy, searches for buried treasure (and unlike any other red-blooded American boy, actually finds it.) Twain created some unforgettable secondary characters; Tom's Aunt Polly, his smarmy little cousin Sid, Becky Thatcher who loves/loathes Tom by turns, and the wicked Injun Joe all stand out, but in Tom and Huck, Twain created two of the best loved figures in American literature, of their own time, our time and all time. The book deserves to be appreciated in all its unsanitized glory; this is the version to read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer", March 3 2004
By A Customer
"The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" is a story about a young boy named Tom Sawyer and his friend Huckleberry Finn, who both manage to find adventure and often get themselves into mischief while doing so, as is the case when one night while at the town grave yard, hoping to clear some warts Tom and Huck witness the murder of one Dr. Robinson. The murder is mainly carried out by Injun Joe, but he will later blame his drunken partner Muff Potter for the crime. Upon witnessing the crime, Tom and Huck quickly decide to run away and live in the woods near the Mississippi river. While there both Tom and Huck agree by oath of blood to never breath a word to anyone about what they saw that night; tom will later brake this promise but only to save Potter.
Soon Tom hears that Muff Potter will be tried for the murder of Mr. Robinson; although Potter did not do it Injun Joe will set up incriminating evidence at the seen of the crime to make Potter look guilty. Potter being hung-over and having little recollection of what happened the previous night also makes him look guilty. Tom soon comes to aid of Potter and testifies that Injun Joe killed Robinson; Injun Joe barely escapes the court house. Fearing for their life Tom, Huck and Tom's friend Joe Harper escape to the woods of the Mississippi river, and for some time "become pirates" through imagination. Being gone for so long, the villagers of St. Petersburg come to the conclusion that while rafting on the river, Tom, Huck, and Joe all drowned.
Tome then make a visit to Aunt Polly's house late at night, seeing that there is still a light on in the wee hours of dusk Tom investigates to find Aunt Polly, Sid Mary and Joe Harpers mom; toms sneaks into the room and manages to get under the bed. There Tom hears and realizes what sorrow has be-fallen Aunt Polly and Mrs. Harper; along with the rest of the village "He warn't bad, so to say-only mischievous. Only just giddy, and harum-scarum, you know. He warn't any more responsible than a colt. He never meant any harm, and he was the best-hearted boy that ever was...and she began to cry." Tom then travels back to camp where Huck Finn and Joe Harper reside, he then convinces them to return home; both boys agree hesitantly.
Tom, Huck, and Joe return just as their funeral is in the midst; soon the three boys become the envy and sole focus of the town. Becky a former fling of Toms reconciles with him and they are one once more, they sneak to the cave together become lost. Tom searches feverishly for an escape route, he doing so he comes upon Injun Joe who is hiding out. After much searching Tom and Becky find an escape route, return home where upon Tom tells the entire town where Injun Joe is. Judge Thatcher closes the Caves, and slowly but surly Injun Joe starves to death never to pose a threat to any other living thing.
This book is amazing, Mark Twain is able to deliver a powerful, emotional story to his readers; a story filled with adventure, mystery, suspense, and intrigue. After reading it I felt like going out and searching for my own adventures. "The Adventures of Tom sawyer" is an adventure in itself, but not in a bad way. When you read it, your emotions get going, it makes you think and speculate what's going to happen next; if a book can do that and more just in the case of this book, then I believe it should be red by everyone, children and grownups.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Tom for all Ages, Feb. 25 2004
By 
jamey watkins (New Hampton,NH,USA) - See all my reviews
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a book that looks to capture the innocence of childhood. From collecting dead cats and brass door knobs, to trying to impress his crush in Sunday school, Tom Sawyer is always good for an adventure. He lives with his aunt Polly and his half brother Sid, but his orphanhood doesn't stop him from causing trouble.
Whether it be faking his own death or being the only witness to a murder along the course of this book, Tom finds his way into different sorts of adventurous mishaps. Throughout the novel Tom matures and experiences many rites of passage. It is fitting that his final step to being a man would have him looking death straight in the eye.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a very smooth read. With every turn of the page there is mystery, suspense, and humor. Twain does a marvelous job of keeping the reader interested in the story. His biggest accomplishment in writing this book is to create an appeal to all audiences, and he did it beautifully. This novel should be recommended to anyone who has never experienced The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
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4.0 out of 5 stars instant childhood, Feb. 24 2004
By 
SeanPaul Jones (New Hampton School) - See all my reviews
In Mark Twain's, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, the reader encounters something so precious, so wonderful that it takes 256 pages to explain--youth. The innocence and jovial spirit that defines this novel bubbles through the bindings. The main character, Tom Sawyer's love for mischief and games like "playing pirates" reminds every one of what it was like to be young.
In this adventure one also encounters adult like conflict, even dealing with mortal danger, such as Tom being chased by the dangerous Injun Joe. We identify with this danger and we are inspired by Tom's courage; he truly acts without fear, with youthful confidence. This puts more emphasis on the carefree mentality of childhood.
Finally we see the values that were once instilled upon us when we were children. The image of Tom Sawyer's legendary "white fence" is something in the mind of every parent when it comes time to punish their own children, the decision of Huck Finn to accept cultivation and civility, and the ethical integrity of Tom to testify against Injun Joe. These events and decisions truly speak louder than words. Reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a time warp to instant childhood, truly something to sit down and enjoy on a serene afternoon of happiness.
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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Barnes & Noble Classics Series) by Mark J. Twain (Mass Market Paperback - Aug. 1 2005)
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