Customer Reviews


147 Reviews
5 star:
 (67)
4 star:
 (40)
3 star:
 (24)
2 star:
 (13)
1 star:
 (3)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect ending to a unique series
I see many people complain that the ending was unsatisfying, but I personally loved it. For an original and epic story such as this one, the ending was just right. It was sad, of course, as most war stories are. But there was also a large element of hope, as the characters we've grown to love throughout the series find a way to live with the immense sorrow and ordeals...
Published on Jan. 9 2012 by ldnsara

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Missing pieces but still worth a read...
It was a modest finish for the Hunger Games saga. Since the novel is written in the first person, any action that occurs while Katniss is unconscious or missing from the event is not fully told. This results in a disjointed novel with large portions of the plot experienced in waiting as Katniss experiences them. On one hand, it is true to the series as a whole. It worked...
Published on July 25 2011 by Toewser


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Missing pieces but still worth a read..., July 25 2011
It was a modest finish for the Hunger Games saga. Since the novel is written in the first person, any action that occurs while Katniss is unconscious or missing from the event is not fully told. This results in a disjointed novel with large portions of the plot experienced in waiting as Katniss experiences them. On one hand, it is true to the series as a whole. It worked well for the previous two novels because Katniss was a main participant in all that occurred. However, in this book, one cannot help but feel cheated out of important events that would have resulted in a well rounded story.

Nevertheless, as a fan of the Hunger Games saga, this book is well worth the money and time. The reader just needs an avid imagination to fill in the rest of the blanks.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Left Me Feeling Let Down, Sept. 16 2011
*** SPOILER ALERT***

I found the book to be too much like Hamlet. The author spent so much time introducing and building characters, only to kill them all off in the end. I don't mind if a character or two is killed, but 90% of the the people were wiped out. On that note, I don't like how she killed Prim. I thought it to be too drastic and as it was too close to the end of the book, there wasn't enough time to wrap your head around it. It happened, Kaniss went crazy, and the book ended; it just didn't seem to fit into the plot properly.

The first 2 books of the series were absolutely amazing! Perhaps this is why I expected so much more out of the third book and perhaps, with those expectations, that is why I was so let down. She spent so much time developing these amazing characters in The Hunger Games and Catching Fire, but then tore them apart in Mockingjay. Katniss was this strong, brave, intelligent fighter who turned into an emotional wreck. I understand that I'd probably be the same way if I were in her shoes, however, I'm not and that's not the character we grew to know and love in the first 2 books. To watch her fall apart in the 3rd was unpleasant and I found myself reading too quickly over the pages in order to get to the end faster in hopes of finding the original Katniss. As for Peeta, I really do wish that he had somehow completely overcome what Snow had done to him. To know that he doesn't and spends his life fighting it and wanting to strangle his wife, just didn't sit too well with me. And as for Gale....

I wasn't a Gale fan to begin with, but I'm also biased when there's two men fighting for the same girl. I pick my guy from the start and nothing will change my mind! I loved Peeta from the start but I loved Gale as well; I just didn't love him for Katniss, so you can imagine how upset I was with the way their relationship ended. They had an unbreakable friendship! He was in love with her, she was possibly in love with him. But in order for the author to make it work between Peeta and Katniss without the audience getting upset that it wasn't Gale, she turned him into a bad guy and dismissed him without any notice. He was the one who killed her sister, something completely unforgivable....

But before I go on, I would also like to give Katniss a good beating! No, he did not kill Prim on purpose. If it had been anyone else, it would have been fine! You went into this rebellion knowing that people would die! You went in knowing that Gale was helping design weapons and, although you weren't happy with it, you didn't stop him. I know you're not happy with the people you've killed, but you're now abandoning your best friend over an accidental kill? In the words of Katniss with the ending of her friendship, "No, instead I feel nothing but relief". This was what made me decide that the book was a let down. You just lost your sister, your home, your friends, and now you're WILLINGLY losing your BEST FRIEND!?!?!

...I would rather have seen Gale fall in love with someone else, or have him (I know it's hypocritical) die. At least then there would have been some form of closure.

There were many other small details that didn't sit too well with me, but I found this to be the most jarring. I know this book was written with political views on war and propaganda but I was hoping for a little more of a plot and a little more closure.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Rushed, and an ending that didn't feel like it fit the series., March 30 2012
I enjoy the first two books. I felt the third was rushed. It definitely took me longer to read, as it had less of my interest and attention. I didn't feel satisfied at the end. I felt upset and like I got hooked for a disappointment. The third book didn't seem to fit with the others, and I wonder if Suzanne rushed this last one. I was disappointed!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect ending to a unique series, Jan. 9 2012
I see many people complain that the ending was unsatisfying, but I personally loved it. For an original and epic story such as this one, the ending was just right. It was sad, of course, as most war stories are. But there was also a large element of hope, as the characters we've grown to love throughout the series find a way to live with the immense sorrow and ordeals they have suffered, and build a new life, with love and wisdom. This is only described briefly in the last few pages of the book, but it is enough.

In my opinion, had the ending been different (read: more optimistic and all-appealing), the series would not have had as much power, and as big an effect on the reader. These were very emotional and intense stories, so it only makes sense that the ending is as realistic as possible, without the absence of love and hope.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars too much doom and gloom, Sept. 25 2010
By 
A. Jacques (Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I'm a big fan of the first 2 books of the hunger games and was very anxious to read the last book but it was so depressing all the way through. It's one negative thing after another. It's just too much sadness. Well, even after having read the other not so good reviews I wasn't expecting much and wasn't deterred because you pretty well have to finish a trilogy but I was disappointed. My heart still aches for a better third book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


26 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. Just didn't like it., Aug. 30 2010
By 
L.Clair (New York, USA) - See all my reviews
Because I've been waiting months for this book, I'd promised myself I'd read it slowly and savour it, becuase after I'm finished there's no more. As it turns out, I read all of Mockingjay the day I received it in the mail. As expected, it was excellent. As dreaded, I didn't like it.

Suzanne seems to be one of those writers whose books get better and better with each installment. I thought Catching Fire was better than The Hunger Games, and Mockingjay is written even better than Catching Fire. After the end...you just have an unquenchable hunger for MORE that will never be satisfied, but that's okay, because it's the mark of a good series.

Despite all that, the problem with Mockingjay, (for me at least) is that it wasn't any fun to read at all.

Sure, it's intense, suspenseful, poignant, and it cuts to the action faster, but I missed Peeta; Katniss's usual spirited and brave demeanor was replaced by a "Who cares?" attitude, and while it might be completely justified, it wasn't any fun on the reader's part; the whole book hangs a downcast, depressing and overly serious tone; I hated the anticlimax.
In lieu of spoilers, I will not mention names, but a certain important character was somewhat randomly dropped off at the end. We weren't given any closure about his relationships with his fellow characters. May or may not leave you feeling cheated.

Another reviewer, on amazon.com I believe, called this book a work of "nihilistic anti-war propaganda;" in other words, Collins is biased into thinking that war is the most disgusting, horrible, and awful thing that ever existed. And while she's entitled to her opinions, especially when they are well-supported, it's untactful to try and force her readers into seeing things her way, instead of giving them the facts and allowing them to form their own opinions.
This seems to be the reason for much of the unnecessary tragic events that happen in this book, and why it's so depressing: the author is putting out propaganda to 'help' us see how very very bad war is, instead of giving us a balanced view of the reasons people go to war, and why it may or may not be the best way to solve a conflict.

Now, the end. We never expected a completely happy ending for a series like this one. We would have enjoyed a bittersweet ending thoroughly. But I think the downer ending was just overdoing it. Did the author purposely twist the ending to a level of heartwrenching sadness? Probably. Was it necessary? Hmmm.

So, the writing was intelligent and unique to its author. The plot was (excepting the anticlimax) tense, winding, and fast-paced, the action neverending. The characters, especially Katniss herself, were depthened even further. Despite that, I didn't like it, I'm sorry.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars yes it was a painful read, to see the characters you love get ..., Oct. 3 2014
I'm really surprised by all the people in the comments complaining about the way this last book went. I'm not sure what kind of ending they really expected since Katnis has been thrown from one tragedy to another until she is broken. This is war, this is trauma. And i for one really appreciated that honest tone to the book. Yes it was dark, yes it was a painful read, to see the characters you love get smashed to bits inside and out till they have trouble even constructing a sense of identity. The reader must remember this is not a TV show, its not here to -entertain- you. The story is simply that, a story, one of love, and loss, and growth and it's not up to us to really judge what Katnis is. She may be a fictional character, but shes a metaphor for many real life experiences and I think that is beyond any whimsical expectation of entertainment.

Now that I'm done chastising the readers I will comment on the book itself:
I found it riveting, realistic, very sad, and above all, honest.I have PTSD and was shocked to find a book that touched on it's realistic consequences in ones life, and appreciated Katnises pain, in a way that others may not. I felt like her journey is an important one to understand in real life. The ability to piece yourself back together when what you love is lost, and what you wanted becomes more than what you wished for, and not in a good way.

I will speak to some of the other complains in the book. The end did seem rushed, and not much closure to the loss of important characters was given. I dont know if this is just bc its a story about Katnis specifically, or if this is a real flaw in the book. But i will say I did crave a little more in that.

The twists at the end are wonderful and terrifying and live up to the first 2 books
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars My Two Cents..., July 6 2012
By 
Adam (Saskatoon, SK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Does Mockingjay = Batman?

War has erupted and the Capitol and the rogue districts are battling it out. The rebels drawn together under the banner of District 13 (once thought to be destroyed) and seek to rally all the other districts against the oppression of the Capitol and their Hunger Games.

Suzanne Collins does an awesome job walking you through another journal of Katniss Everdeen as she discovers just how messed up her world really is. Peeta is captured and insane. District 13 is a hole in the ground... but one that provides shelter from the refugees of District 12. President Coin (District 13's president) proves to be just as manipulative as President Snow.

The adventure follows Katniss as she decides whether or not she wants to be the rebellion's figurehead: the Mockingjay. She eventually agrees and dons the suit (I get picturesin my head of a Batmanesque figure) and embarks on an adventure to discover just how little she is trusted even by District 13.

The ending seems to be something of a debate whether or not it is good. I will leave that to the reader to decide, but it does tie up all the loose ends (at least the ones I was paying attention to) so that the story has come to a close.

For the sheer fact of wanting to know what happens, I recommend this book, but I don't feel that it was as well written as the previous two in the series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Civil war, or one last extreme hunger games?, June 16 2012
By 
*SPOILERS*
Do not read further if you do not wish to learn plot details from the book and it's ending.

After the first two books that built on the characters that readers come to really care about, Collins herself seems to stop caring whether we had cared about them or not, and the resulting last installment is more a sloppy, gruesome "hunger games" than a civil war. There are countless unnecessary mutilation & deaths of most of the key characters, leaving just a small handful of the original characters alive, and we don't even get to know what happens to many of them at the end, with only a vague reference to Gale's fate. The freedom fighters seem to be as bad as the Capital in some areas, especially toward the end of the book when it is probable that they are responsible for the death of a group of children and then the first responders, including the character that Katniss had been fighting to save, her sister. This is made more probable by the fact that the leader of the resistance wants to have a final hunger games to sacrifice the innocent children of the Capital as a form of revenge.

This last book of the trilogy took the series from the surreal into head-shaking ridiculousness, with unbelievable, rose-scented "mutts", "pods" of death that they have a map for, but of course there are many, many undocumented ones that result in death & maiming in ever increasing levels of gruesomeness, to the point that Collins seems to just want to outdo herself in just how gruesome she can make death appear.

The Mockingjay reads more as a movie script than a book, obviously intended to become a feature film, though with this level of gruesomeness I personally wouldn't want to see on the big screen, and I'm not ordinarily the squeamish sort. The book also seems very rushed - especially at the end - as if there was quite a bit of pressure to complete it, or that Collins herself had started to lose interest in the characters and plot.

The ending was as anti-climatic as any ending of a book or movie could possibly be, seemed hurriedly written, disappointing in the extreme, and with many loose ends. We don't know what happens to her "stylists", Gale is skimmed over, and we're unsure of how stable Peeta is. We are left instead with a permanently damaged Katniss who is now an almost empty shell of what she once was, without family & friends, and stuck with a man whose own brokenness and potential instances of out-right homicidal insanity makes their life together as mates frankly unbelievable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Will Mockingjay stay with you for always? Absolutely., April 12 2012
This review has spoilers! Read at your own discretion.

I finished reading Mockingjay within 5 days after reading the first two books in the previous two weeks. Personally, I thought it was a difficult book to read but not because it was poorly written or because it was uninteresting. On the contrary, I was completely hooked as I was with the first two novels. No, the reason this book was difficult to read was largely because of what the book's characters, specifically, Katniss and Peeta, had to go through during the story. Now, I'll admit that I was greatly impressed by The Hunger Games in the sense that it was a literal page-turner with thrilling action and edge-of-your-seat suspense. Furthermore, the events of the first Hunger Games provided the perfect setting for the developing relationship between Katniss and Peeta. In fact, I'll admit right now that my favourite part of the entire series was their relationship and how it grew from it being only Peeta who was genuinely in love while Katniss was at first distrustful and then playing the Capitol's role of star-crossed lovers, to her discovering in Catching Fire how important Peeta was to her and how she truly did care for him. Sadly, this relationship is completely shattered in Mockingjay and it is only through sheer determination that Katniss and Peeta are able to slowly and delicately rebuild the love and trust that they had steadily built throughout the first two books.

There is no denying that Katniss is a heroic figure in the first two novels and unfortunately, as many have already noted, the Katniss in Mockingjay is much more passive with her faults being on greater display. However, this is understandable to an extent as throughout the first half of the book, Katniss is reacting to Peeta's capture and is clearly struggling to carry out her responsibilities as the Mockingjay, the symbol of the rebellion that is now sweeping across Panem. Now people may feel that Mockingjay was weaker from a quality perspective but in my opinion, there were many passages in this book that were incredibly touching and well-written such as when Katniss completely breaks down after seeing a frail and injured Peeta being interviewed by Caesar and can only be comforted by Haymitch as he is the only person who can understand the pain that Katniss feels from letting Peeta fall into the Capitol's grasp. Shortly thereafter, Peeta is rescued but unfortunately, his hijacking has seemingly destroyed all traces of the Peeta that the reader had come to love and most shocking of all, he has lost his unconditional love for Katniss, a quality that defined Peeta in the previous books. Now, many have argued that Katniss displays great weakness and insensitivity during this part of the novel with respect to how she avoids Peeta and doesn't attempt to bring him back to his former self. Although I did find myself angry with Katniss at times, overall, I felt this was realistic as Katniss was never as emotionally strong as Peeta was and at this point, she is still struggling with her feelings for Peeta and Gale. Luckily however, with insight from Haymitch, Katniss does begin to take a more proactive role in helping Peeta through his recovery after Haymitch makes Katniss realize that if the situations were reversed Peeta would be doing everything in his power to bring Katniss back regardless of how difficult it may be.

Now with respect to other events in the novel, the final Capitol mission was both riveting and horrific and my only disappointment was to see beloved characters such as Finnick and Prim meet such quick and tragic ends. Personally, these two characters were far more developed than Gale ever was who I was never able to view as a fully-fledged character given his large absence in the first two books. Personally, the only reason I believe Katniss did not become aware of her feelings for Peeta sooner was because the Capitol was forcing them together and subconsciously Katniss did not wish to be forced into a relationship, especially marriage, as she wished to retain her freewill which she believed Gale represented. Overall, I did find the book to have a compelling story although I will admit it wasn't as enjoyable to read in comparison to the other two books, largely given Katniss's anguish and the loss of Peeta's dynamic personality. There were however a few light moments such as Katniss and Johanna's training regime and the scene with Finnick and Boggs (it involved underwear.) I will agree that towards the end, it did feel like the author was trying to wrap things up a bit too quickly although I did enjoy the twist with President Coin and the vote for a final Hunger Games where Katniss demonstrated her resolve to make a courageous choice that would ultimately benefit all of Panem. I do feel however, that it was a mistake to have Katniss sit out her trial as this would have given her the opportunity to explain her convictions and prove to the reader that she had returned to her heroic self. In fact, I was greatly disappointed with the epilogue as it implied that despite having two children, Katniss was never able to recover and spent the remainder of her days in the remnants of District 12, forever damaged beyond repair. On a much more satisfying note, as there was never any doubt in my mind that Katniss and Peeta would end up together, I was deeply touched by the novel's final lines before the epilogue where Katniss finally admits her love to Peeta through a touching exchange where Peeta asks "You love me. Real or not real?" and Katniss replies "Real." As was mentioned by Gale, Katniss would choose the boy she could not survive without and without a shadow of a doubt, that was always going to be Peeta given the characters' complimenting personalities and experiences in the games. In fact, I feel this would have been a better conclusion to the series as it provided hope that better days awaited the two lovers despite all the hardships and horrific nightmares that would forever burden them. As many have noted, Suzanne Collins succeeds in conveying her message that war is a terrible thing and that there can never be any victors but only survivors as demonstrated by the nonsensical and heart-breaking death of Prim.

Coming to the novel's end, I was saddened that this would be my last time reading about Katniss and Peeta whose friendship and devotion to one another allowed them to overcome the trials that were cruelly thrust upon them. Furthermore, I was greatly pleased to see that despite his unspeakable trauma, Peeta did in the end succeed in keeping his wish to remain unchanged as he had expressed in the first novel and although largely absent, Peeta is given the opportunity to demonstrate his inner strength towards the novel's end with his willingness to kill himself after realizing the danger he presents to Katniss and by ensuring that Katniss does not kill herself after shooting Coin. Now, if you asked me if Mockingjay was how I envisioned the final novel, my answer would be no. The thrill and excitement I had while reading the first two novels was largely replaced with grief and sorrow as Katniss was faced with one more crushing horror after the other and every passing page seemed to guarantee the loss of Peeta forever until the last 100 pages. As I said at the beginning of this review, I did not find this to be a bad book as it did succeed in telling a gripping story with characters who experienced very real emotions. I do feel however, that some things could have been improved upon such as the final confrontation and death of President Snow and the fates of certain characters such as Cinna, Haymitch and Gale. Now, although I can't say this book had a completely satisfying conclusion it did succeed in my opinion with respect to Katniss and Peeta's relationship although I do wish we could have seen more of the characters we had come to love in the first two novels. On the other hand, the events of Mockingjay do remind the reader of how special Katniss and Peeta's relationship is which was integral to my satisfaction from reading this book. Therefore, despite the pain I felt while reading this book, I am truly glad that I got around to reading this series and despite any reservations I may have against Mockingjay, this series did leave a strong impression on me and in the end, that is what made these books real to me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 215 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Mockingjay: The Final Book of the Hunger Games
Mockingjay: The Final Book of the Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (Paperback - March 26 2012)
CDN$ 15.99 CDN$ 11.54
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews